Windows power plan settings explorer utility

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by mbk1969, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    I can see in my dumpfile.xml that each event
    Code:
    <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
        <System>...</System>
        <EventData>
            <Data Name="Group">0</Data>
            <Data Name="Affinity">0xFFF</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrentCores">4</Data>
            <Data Name="HistogramSize">      13</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">103107315848</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">35738210067</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">10386967355</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">4570896171</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">2273847747</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">1283011509</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">1004873916</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">417894504</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">393221673</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">222198035</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">140758082</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">110017092</Data>
            <Data Name="ConcurrencyHistogram">478109021</Data>
            <Data Name="DistributeCores">2</Data>
        </EventData>
        <RenderingInfo Culture="ru-RU">
            <Level>Verbose </Level>
            <Opcode>Info </Opcode>
            <Keywords>
                <Keyword>Diag</Keyword>
            </Keywords>
            <Task>ParkNodeRecordedStats</Task>
            <Provider>Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Processor-Power </Provider>
        </RenderingInfo>
    </Event>
    
    corresponds to each line in WPA and
    <Data Name="ConcurrentCores">4</Data>
    shows the number of concurrent cores.
     
  2. jbone1313

    jbone1313 New Member

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    I am really grateful for this awesome tool. Some questions please:

    1. When my CPU is in C1, how can I know it is in C1 and not in C1E? I.e., if Performance Monitor or HWInfo is showing my CPU in C1, can I be sure it is not in C1E?
    2. With Throttlestop, I can get my CPU clock locked to its maximum turbo setting by disabling C1E and setting EPP to 0, but I would like to able to do that without using Throttlestop. While I think I have EPP set to 0 in my power plan, I cannot seem to get my CPU clock locked to its maximum without disabling C1E. Is there a way to get my CPU clock locked to its maximum by setting power plan settings? I tried disabling idle, but that raises up my temperatures and cranks up the fans, while that does not happen with those two settings in Throttlestop.

    My CPU is an Intel 13900HX, and my laptop's BIOS does not give me the ability to disable C1E.

    Here are my current power plan settings:

    Processor performance core parking min cores: 100%
    Processor energy performance preference policy: 0%
    Processor performance boost policy: 100%
    Processor idle demote threshold: 100%
    Processor performance time check interval: 5000 Milliseconds
    Processor idle promote threshold: 100%
    Minimum processor state: 100%
    Maximum processor state: 100%
    Processor performance boost mode: enabled
    Link state power management: Off
    USB selective suspend setting: Off

    Many thanks!
     
  3. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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  4. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    Interesting stuff concerning C-states and Intel 12th generation of Core processors:
    https://edc.intel.com/content/www/u...e-1-of-2/005/processor-ia-core-c-state-rules/
     
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  5. jbone1313

    jbone1313 New Member

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    Thanks for the tool link. I have been playing with it. The results I get are consistent with some other tests I ran after my post yesterday. To wit:

    With C1E DISABLED and core parking ENABLED, I CAN hit my turbo clock speeds.
    With C1E ENABLED and core parking DISABLED, I CANNOT hit my turbo clock speeds.
    With C1E ENABLED and core parking ENABLED, I CANNOT hit my turbo clock speeds.

    Open questions:
    1. I doubt it, but is there any way to disable C1E without a third party tool, given that it is not available in my BIOS?
    2. Is there any way to hit my turbo clock speeds with core parking DISABLED?
    3. Is there any way to hit my turbo clock speeds with C1E ENABLED?
    4. When my CPU is in C1, how can I know it is in C1 and not in C1E? I.e., if Performance Monitor or HWInfo is showing my CPU in C1, can I be sure it is not in C1E?
    5. In Quick CPU, the "Package c-state limit" setting is locked. Is that due to the limitations of my machine, or is there some way to unlock it? It does not seem like it is locked due to any power plan settings I changed, since it remains locked on default plans.
    My goals:
    1. Lock turbo clock speeds with core parking DISABLED.
    2. Minimize use of third party tools.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2024
  6. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    I suspect when you see "C1" in a report about C-state residency you see just ACPI name for the lightest of C-states. ACPI names are "C0, C1, C2, C3". When it comes to certain CPU it can support "C1E", "C6", etc - those are actual HW supported C-states (each is mapped to one ACPI C-state).

    Wait for Donduck to reply, he has laptop too, and he dived into all that deeper than any of us here.
     
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  7. Donduck

    Donduck Master Guru

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    @jbone1313
    I don't get why you don't want to use a 3rd-party tool, ThrottleStop can add this configuration to the .ini file so that it exits automatically after 1 second:
    Code:
    ExitTime=1
    Keep ThrottleStop running in background so that it can resume settings after waking up from sleep/hibernate.
    The report generated by HWiNFO tells whether C1E is enabled or not.
    Decrease core parking min core count and concurrency threshold (not concurrency distribution threshold), or increase headroom threshold. These general approaches are mean to hit highest clock rate, but core parking always comes with side effects, tune them wisely. I wasn't a fan of core parking long ago, until I saw it decrease core current by 15% in my video playback power consumption test.
    Windows doesn't handle hardware C-states, it only knows ACPI C0~C3.

    To be honest, I don't think there exists a concrete method to lock clock rate at max on a laptop, laptops' CPU need to have power balancing with dGPU, max CPU performance ≠ best performance. In the high performance range, power limit is more significant than power settings.

    You can try to use P-cores only and park E-cores to save more thermal budget. Windows 11 can also set SMT unpark policy=round robin to not use SMT, which is also good for increasing clock rate. Disabling autonomous mode and let Windows handle frequency might work, but I am not a fan of doing that.

    QoS levels might also affect clock rate because background threads can run at less performant frequency/EPP and decrease the average, overlays can also override your EPP setting.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2024
  8. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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  9. jbone1313

    jbone1313 New Member

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    @Donduck
    Throttlestop is great. I am just one of those people who enjoys rolling my own stuff. I like getting my hands dirty, and I like the deeper understanding that brings me. As a general best practice, I try to avoid 3rd party tools where possible, but I am not absolute about it.

    I get your point. I was inspired by and curious about a video I saw which showed how, using Throttlestop, we can lock the clock to its maximum turbo value by setting EPP to 0 and disabling C1E. While that does work for me, it is probably unnecessary, as I don't game, my workload is low latency audio, and I am not really CPU bound.

    I originally went down this rabbit hole trying to solve some Nvidia DPC latency spikes, which I have sorted. After comparing LatencyMon with and without C1E enabled, I think I am giving up on wanting to disable C1E, since it did not make a difference in my tests, and I am giving up on trying to lock my clock speed.

    Really appreciate your reply.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2024
  10. jbone1313

    jbone1313 New Member

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    Thanks for that. I have seen some ways people are enabling advanced BIOS settings with Lenovo laptops. If I decide to mess with that, then I will check that out.
     

  11. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    @Donduck

    When you talk "EPP" you mean "Processor energy performance preference policy", right?
    Code:
    Setting:
      Processor energy performance preference policy
    
    Description:
      Specify how much processors should favour energy savings over performance when operating in autonomous mode.
    
    Subgroup:
      Processor power management
    
    Range, Units:
      0 .. 100 %
    
    Subgroup / Setting GUIDs:
      54533251-82be-4824-96c1-47b60b740d00 / 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863
    
    (It is "EPPP" so I got lost for a moment there...)
     
  12. Donduck

    Donduck Master Guru

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    EPP (energy performance preference) are UEFI registers to write in, not exactly a policy calculated by OS.
     
  13. Tom O'Bedlam

    Tom O'Bedlam New Member

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    Hello and thank you for making this app available. Unfortunately when I launch it the options and checkboxes are all there, but I am unable to make any changes, the options all stay checked and aren't editable. I started it as Admin too, but still no dice. I'm on Windows II, latest update blah blah. What am I missing? T
    Thanks,
    Tom




     
  14. EdKiefer

    EdKiefer Ancient Guru

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    How are you editing and saving edit's?
    You must click on apply button in lower right corner.

    If your doing that maybe post pic of the window so we can see it.
     
  15. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    Checkboxes are used only in column "hidden" in main grid and in column "active" in lower grid (do not require to click "Apply" button). You can ignore them.

    To edit power plan settings you have to use "AC value" and "DC value" columns (DC one is visible only on laptops)
    upload_2024-5-7_15-49-3.png
    upload_2024-5-7_15-50-38.png
     

  16. Donduck

    Donduck Master Guru

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    I did see DC column on a desktop......
     
  17. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    Probably with UPS recognised in Windows...
     
  18. Guru3Dmember

    Guru3Dmember Active Member

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    Is there a W11 gaming, low latency power plan? I've been using "Amit's Low Latency Power Plan" but I'm assuming it was created on a W10 platform and it appears W11 has more settings.
     
  19. Donduck

    Donduck Master Guru

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    The only one that matters a lot on Windows 11 is SMT unpark policy, and some untested new settings will roll out in 24H2.
     
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  20. Guru3Dmember

    Guru3Dmember Active Member

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    What is that best set to? "Use cores policy to unpark all logical processors in a core as a group" ?
     

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