Windows 11 is up to 15 percent slower with AMD CPUs, fixes coming in October

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Oct 7, 2021.

  1. Nicked_Wicked

    Nicked_Wicked Master Guru

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    Hopefully gets fixed soon, I’m pretty content with W11 so far. Took a bit of adjusting but it feels smooth and snappy. Looks nicer than W10 and performance feels great too despite the temporary regression. For my main build W11 is a keeper. :p
     
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  2. Mannerheim

    Mannerheim Ancient Guru

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    New windows is waste of resources. more heavy more shitty. Not even single reason to downgrade to win 11
     
  3. Timur Born

    Timur Born Active Member

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    No error, no warning and afaiks not even an information message in the logs after disabling TPM. On the contrary, 2 warning about certificates were fixed by disabling TPM.
     
  4. Timur Born

    Timur Born Active Member

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    Overall I can confirm that various things feel more snappy, especially login and logoff (the latter at the cost of having no timeout to display an error window that pops up). Explorer has some GUI performance oddities, which partly can be worked around by using the old W10 explorer.

    I don't like that taskbar icons are forced to be stacked, so I used StartAllBack to get back W10 Taskbar, Explorer and context-menus for the time being.

    Something I despise in modern UI/UX "design" is having my screen estate wasted by empty space while I have to scroll and navigate to sub-menus. It's worst with most antivirus software, because they even use fixed window sizes, but what use in resizing if the space just stays empty?

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Exodite

    Exodite Ancient Guru

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    I'd argue there's plenty there that's dramatically different.

    Ignoring the technical issues, TPM-related concerns etc. for the moment I see the biggest issue with the UI.

    Not talking about the centered task bar buttons, though inconsistent placing of UI elements (they move depending on the number of open applications and screen real estate) is poor design in general.
    No, I'm talking about the no-label, icon only, auto-merged task bar and incredibly inconsistent start menu design. It looks like someone vomited up a large amount of half-digested skittles all over the screen, incidentally a feeling last trigged by the Metro design.

    I'm one of the people who're incredibly visual in my information intake, though I can't "see" icons. They're meaningless to me, not scannable at all. I need text, preferably alphabetically sorted, single-scroll lists of items to give me any sense of orientation.

    Not taking that kind of thing into account is even worse design.

    Generally speaking the worst possible point of differentiation between Windows, or any software, versions is UI design. Ideally UI design should never change, as that comes with the greatest possible cost for the end user. Obviously the possibility of change and redesign must be left open to allow for genuine improvements to filter through but in general UI design should be extremely conservative.

    With Widows we get the opposite though, actual changes between versions are surface deep only but those changes are usually substantive - merely to be able to "show" a difference between version I suspect.

    There are plenty of reasons to skip Windows 11, at least for now, but for me the one rising to the top would be the inconsistent and painful-to-navigate UI.

    Obviously not everyone is going to feel the same way about it, and I'm by no means asking for you to defend Microsoft on this Stormyandcold - I'm sorry if the post feel too targeted at you, but these are basic UI design issues and it's frankly an embarrassment that a company like Microsoft can't get this right.

    I'm hardly in their focus group but if Microsoft wanted me to get excited over a new version of Windows they'd commit to reducing the footprint by 90% (memory, storage, services running), adopt a long-term, system-wide UI style guide or promise some significant technical changes.
    As opposed to redesigning the UI, again, and promising slightly better support for a single CPU architecture from a single vendor.

    But that's just me. :p
     
  6. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    I don't see an issue with using W11 in a review of AL....but no honest reviewer is going to compare AL to Ryzen on W11 until they know the AMD performance regression is fixed. An honest review is only going to compare AL performance difference between W10 and W11.

    There are no benchmarks for "snappiness" or "responsiveness". If I click on a taskbar icon in W11 and it opens faster than in W10, why would I need benchmarks? Some of you rely far too heavily on benchmarks, for things benchmarks are a poor representation of.

    There's plenty of rational reasons to upgrade. For me, having everything centered on the taskbar without the need for 3rd party software is a perfectly rational reason to upgrade, as is the "new" start menu. What's deemed "rational" to one user, may not be to another.

    I ran plenty of benchmarks before migrating to W11 so, theoretically, I could compare benchmark results between them. I just don't see a need to spend hours re-running benchmarks that will ultimately prove useless to me. Personally, I'm not noticing any performance loss.
     
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  7. pegasus1

    pegasus1 Maha Guru

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    Had it on several machines since day 1, no issues, just moved the taskbar back to the left side and now its like W10 (with Start 10) only slicker.
     
  8. geogan

    geogan Master Guru

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    Because "snappiness" or "responsiveness" is highly subjective and usually not true. I'm not sure if there are benchmarks that measure it... doesn't that PCMark open and close things lots of times to try and measure this? Anyway all I am saying is someone's personal opinion that something "feels faster" is not usually worth the paper its written on.
     
  9. pegasus1

    pegasus1 Maha Guru

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    Just because you disagree, it doesn't make you right. If anybody does something enough they get to notice if that thing is suddenly different, it called absence of the normal, presence of the abnormal, or in some circles 'a change to the pattern of life'.
     
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  10. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    It's literally impossible to develop a benchmark to measure "responsiveness" or "snappiness"..... PCMark measures application load time. It can't measure how fast the system actually responds to user input. There is no software that can and it's impossible to develop software capable of such.

    "snappiness" and "responsiveness" are objective observations based on experience.
     

  11. Kool64

    Kool64 Maha Guru

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    I've had it on my main rig for over 2 months and I've not noticed anything with my 3700x.
     

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