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What should normal/safe operating temperature be for a M.2 NVMe drive?

Discussion in 'SSD and HDD storage' started by tibo1010, Dec 10, 2017.

  1. tibo1010

    tibo1010 New Member

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    GPU:
    GeForce GTX 1080Ti
    I have a Samsung 960 Pro 512MB M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe drive. Does anyone know what the normal/safe operating temperature should be for this drive or any M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe based drive? My 960 Pro has an average operating temperature of 44 degrees Celsius. This is during web browsing, having multiple MS Office documents open and running several Virtual Machines.

    I have this drive installed on a Gigabyte X299 Aorus Gaming 9 motherboard in the bottom-most M.2 slot (directly below the PCH) which I believe would offer the best thermals.

    I'd be grateful for your comments
     
  2. joey79

    joey79 Member

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    Hey tibo,
    according to the 960 PRO datasheet, is supports operating temperatures (measured through SMART) from 0 - 70°C (32 - 185°F). (http://www.samsung.com/semiconducto...nt/Samsung_SSD_960_PRO_Data_Sheet_Rev_1_1.pdf)
    Every (decent) M.2 NVMe SSD has an over-temperature protection, so it will throttle it's speed if running too hot.
    From my experience a normal working temp is around 35-40°C and around 60-70°C in heavy workload. M.2 SSDs are getting a little hoter than SATA, but no worries. Best thing is to have a case fan in the area of the M.2 which provides a bit of air flow to the SSD surface. I have a 950 PRO cased in an alphacool M.2 SSD cooler, that lowered my working temps by around 3-4°C.
    If you want to google around a bit, there are statements from hardcore techs, that suggest, that a higher temperature is better for working/powered flash cells (less wear). Since for unused storage (unpowered) a lower temperature can hold the data longer, but all that is nothing to worry about for average users.
     
  3. tibo1010

    tibo1010 New Member

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    Hi Joey,

    Many thanks for your reply which I found very useful and informative. I really appreciate it.
     
  4. Guru01

    Guru01 Master Guru

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    ASUS ROG STRIX 1070
    If you do run into issue with your M.2. like blue screens in the os, or odd issues, try purchasing a heatsink for it. Make sure it fits and is compatible with your board and everything though, which shouldn't be an issue. Something like this...

    https://www.amazon.com/EKWB-3830046991737-EK-M-2-NVMe-Heatsink/dp/B073RHHYCM
     

  5. tibo1010

    tibo1010 New Member

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    Thanks for the heads up. I'll definetley look into the EKWB heatsink
     
  6. blurp33

    blurp33 Member Guru

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    Heat will throttle your SSD it will not crash it.
     
  7. A2Razor

    A2Razor Master Guru

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    Just adding in here -- never had problems with M2's getting up to around ~55c, such as when covered by a videocard. (in motherboards that do this design wise)

    Installing a side chasis fan blowing over the PCI-E slots actually dropped the temps by almost 10c (at first reaching around 64c). Any small amount of airflow is pretty much all that they need.
     

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