What is "Framerate Smoothing"? (Batman Arkham Knight for example)

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by EerieEgg, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. EerieEgg

    EerieEgg Member Guru

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    Hi there guys,

    I recently was replaying Batman Arkham Knight and was trying out Kaldaien's Batman Tweaker and noticed the Framerate Smoothing option in both the Arkham Knight menu as well as in the tweaker.

    1) What exactly does "Framerate Smoothing" do?
    2) What's the "Con" / drawback? Does it just limit fps dynamically to what it believes your PC can consistently achieve?
    3) Does it do anything if G-Sync is Enabled/On?
    4) Does FRS do anything if you're already capping your fps? Should it be used in conjunction with an fps cap or does it work best with fps unlocked?

    My intent with this title is to bring down the hitching and stuttering that frequently occurs for me (and this is on an SSD w/ a 1080 Ti + 8700K +G-Sync w/ V-Sync ON in the control panel). I find I'm very sensitive to micro stutter so I'm capping the framerate to 63.333 via Rivatuner as a reasonable target @1440p with the Normal game settings (no Nvidia Gameworks presently).

    Anyway, am wondering if I should enable FRS or turn it off -- perhaps notably it is enabled by default in this title.

    Thank you for your help and time, I tried Googling this, but didn't see a clear reputable answer around.

    EDIT:

    I did find this reply in the UE4 threads, but after re-reading it, I don't think I really understand: https://answers.unrealengine.com/questions/90743/what-exactly-does-smooth-frame-rate-do.html From link:

    > "With Frame Rate Smoothing, the application is determining what range is acceptable for frame rate wandering, so you can cap your frame rate to between Min and Max allowable frame rates. Since this is application based, it will make these changes before any hardware vsync changes. (<-- TL;DR answer)"

    So is it shorthand for Adaptive V-Sync in conjunction with V-Sync ON in-game? This answer doesn't make much of any sense to me and I expect I'm misinterpreting what they're saying. Another comment there states the following:

    > "The smoothing helps to smooth out the stuttering that can happen when your system either climbs really far above the target frame rate or too far below it which helps to avoid screen tearing (above) and stuttering (below)."

    So the effect is to reduce discernible hitching/stutter then? That sounds like a very good thing so what exactly is the drawback/trade-off/negative to having this feature ON? Does the feature do nothing unless you're using the in-game V-Sync option then?
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  2. EerieEgg

    EerieEgg Member Guru

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    @RealNC Sorry to bother you, but historically you've been a real wealth of knowledge for this sorta thing. If you get the chance and happen to know, I'd appreciate it. Thanks,
     
  3. Astyanax

    Astyanax Ancient Guru

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    I believe this is an adaptive triplebuffering implementation specific to unreal engine, between the min and max smoothing values triplebuffering is used, anything lower than the min is double.
     
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  4. RealNC

    RealNC Ancient Guru

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    @EerieEgg

    I don't know what it does, really. It seems to prevent sudden upward jumps in frame rate, but other than that, no idea.
     
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  5. droopy_ro

    droopy_ro Active Member

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    I have this option in War40k Inquisitor Martyr. With it on it seems to double the frame rate, but i don't know why, so i just leave it on :)
     
  6. EerieEgg

    EerieEgg Member Guru

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    @RealNC Thanks anyhow, I appreciate it.

    @Astyanax Thanks, that's helpful -- huh, that's actually a really interesting technique if that's what it's doing -- if that's what it actually is, then it's sorta similar to Adaptive V-Sync except it goes between double/triple buffering instead of double/off.
     

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