What are the optimal setting to use in Nvidia control panel for RTX 3080

Discussion in 'Videocards - NVIDIA GeForce Drivers Section' started by ern88, Apr 4, 2021.

  1. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    AF is more a preference rather than requirement.
    You can look at it like you look at a camera depth of field and aperture (sort of).
    The higher the value the less blurred texture at a distance.

    You need vsync on with gsync for less tearing around the edges of the screen.
    It works differently in combination with gsync and only applies frame time compensation to reduce (eliminate) tearing at edges.
    What you don't want is to reach the max Hz/framerate where vsync kicks in full introducing more input lag etc.

    Also gsync in windowed mode cause stuttering and problems with software like photoshop etc so rather keep it for full screen only.
     
  2. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    AF is nothing like a camera aperture. Aperture (amongst other things, like the focal length and distance from the focusing point) determines how wide the depth of field is. And you can focus on something in the distance, leaving the foreground blurred out. AF simply makes textures crisper further into the distance.

    I've never seen any tearing with GSYNC on / VSYNC off.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
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  3. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    Technically speaking, aperture controls the light that goes into a lens and it also controls the depth of field.
    Mine was a generic example hence I added "sort of" making common folk to understand that the higher AF you set in nvcp the clearer the texture rendering at distance. Sort of setting an aperture from f1.8 to say f8 makes the entire image clearer.

    Tearing is visible towards the edges on my gsync (hardware) and freesync monitors unless I enable vsync.
    When I enable vsync the edges tearing is gone.
     
  4. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    With aperture, the depth of field width will also depend on other criteria, like I mentioned above, focal length and and distance to the object you're shooting. Shooting macro for example, even at f/11 you just about get a fly fully in focus, side on, with everything in front and behind completely blurred. What's wrong with wanting sharper textures btw? There's literally no performance hit using 16xAF anyway.

    Maybe I haven't noticed any tearing as I am on an Odyssey G9 and the edges are in my peripheral. Maybe I'll look into this VSYNC + GSYNC thing. The G9 is a 240hz monitor so I shouldn't really worry about going over 240fps in games anyway.
     

  5. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    There is nothing wrong setting AF 16x, like I said, it's a matter of preference rather than requirement.

    There is no point getting in photography technical details, I can see you understand what I mean. Of course it depends on distance and other factors, mine was a general example, think more of when you are shooting a wider scene like an image from a game (landscape).

    Regarding vsync I bumped into it while flying in warcraft for example, toward the edges (mostly top/bottom) there was tearing, at least to my trained eye. Also in racing games when image is constantly moving.
    From what I understood vsync activates a frame time compensation feature when used with gsync, specifically to eliminate these un-synced area of the screen.
     
  6. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    Like I've said before, I have not noticed any tearing with VSYNC off, ever. Maybe that's due to the fact that even if it happened, at 240hz refresh rate it would be a lot less noticeable. I'll keep an eye out. I usually notice these things.
     
  7. RealNC

    RealNC Ancient Guru

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    The only ones I ever came across are some of the Codemasters games (Grid, F1 and Dirt series games.) In some of them, forced AF would result in horizontal lines being visible on textures.

    In general however, I come across more games that do need forced AF compared to games that have issues with it.
     
  8. Mineria

    Mineria Ancient Guru

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    Almost all newer games handle AFx16 as well as driver forced AF, hence why there is no point in forcing it via driver unless: A. It is used up against old games B. It is used for a game that does not have it build in but supports it when forced via NVCPL.
    For the few games that fall into the category I just force it via their profile instead, which are around 4-5 games out of 700 or so, if I installed all...
    Currently I only got one game installed that benefits from forcing it, also got Negative LOD Bias set to Clamp and AF sample optimization disabled for that particular game, else it won't work.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
  9. Mineria

    Mineria Ancient Guru

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    It does not depend on game but on FPS, so if your not hitting 240+ FPS it doesn't really matter, you will only notice it once FPS goes above your monitors/set refresh rate.
    G-Sync handles everything within dynamic ranges below the set max, V-Sync takes care of the scanout frames when going above.
     
  10. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    Frame time compensation actually kicks in while gsync is active at less than max framerate, if vsync is enabled.
    What you don't want is to reach that max framerate so then full vsync is active.

    What he meant was because of his high framerate the minor tearing at edges might be hard to notice, which is a valid point.
    I only notice it on my games (100-140fps) probably is a lot less at 200fps +
     

  11. Mineria

    Mineria Ancient Guru

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    It does no harm hitting exactly max. only when going above introduces input latency which creates tearing.
    You want to use a cap in addition to both syncs in such case since v-sync isn't flawless either.

    Source: G-SYNC 101: Closing FAQ | Blur Busters
     
  12. cucaulay malkin

    cucaulay malkin Ancient Guru

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    it happens mafia 3 definitive had it
     
  13. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    Ok, so one game? And was this at 240hz?
     
  14. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    Yeah, that's what I thought. I mean I only have a measly 2080 and I run my games at 5120x1440 so going over 240fps is almost never a thing.

    By all means, if I played some indie games that want to run at over 240fps at that resolution on my hardware, I would most definitely notice it. But it's not a thing on my setup.

    But thanks for clearing that up, explains why I've never come across this issue.
     
  15. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    I don't think that was explained right.

    The top/bottom screen tearing is visible with gsync only active even if you don't hit max fps/Hz.
    If you look at that blurbuster link :

    Alright, I now understand why the V-SYNC option and a framerate limiter is recommended with G-SYNC enabled, but why use both?
    (ADDED: 05/02/2019)


    Because, with G-SYNC enabled, each performs a role the other cannot:

    • Enabling the V-SYNC option is recommended to 100% prevent tearing in both the very upper (frametime variances) and very lower (frametime spikes) G-SYNC range. However, unlike framerate limiters, enabling the V-SYNC option will not keep the framerate within the G-SYNC range at all time.

    To put it simple, it's better to have vsync and gsync on at the same time, as long as you limit your max framerate a few fps lower than your resolution Hz.

    The tearing is not noticeable if you focus mainly on center of the image, but if you look for it at the top and bottom edge you can see it in flying animations or racing or even when running with a character.
     

  16. metagamer

    metagamer Ancient Guru

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    Like I've said, I've never seen any tearing on my monitor with VSYNC off. Give me a sec, I'll edit this in a minute.

    EDIT: Ok so... Seeing as I have a high res 240hz monitor and based on my hardware and how I use it, I think I haven't seen any tearing because...

    1. I will always cap games bellow my monitor's refresh rate, if the game is less demanding and likely to hit over 240fps.
    2. I have honestly not come across games that have insane frametime spikes and could potentially cause tearing. Maybe I don't play games that have these performance issues, I don't know. But I'm very sensitive to tearing and I have not seen it. So I have VSYNC off always and I can honestly say, tearing is a non issue here.

    EDIT2: Also, according to your link, GSYNC on/VSYNC off will cause screen wide tearing if framerate spikes over the monitor's refresh rate, which will also disengage GSYNC at the same time. NEVER ever have I seen that happen, ever. Also contradicts everything about screen edge only tearing mentioned above. Also, that article is 4 years old, kinda irrelevant by today's standards, that's my guess, at least, because that is not how my monitor behaves at all.

    In fact, my other monitor, which is a 27" 1440p, 165hz GSYNC monitor never exhibited this issue either.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
  17. RealNC

    RealNC Ancient Guru

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    The articles you link to clearly show that there is a big latency increase if you hit max. So it's recommended to cap to -3 to be safe, at least when using higher than 60Hz displays. In fact, the nvidia driver will automatically cap to at least -2 at 60Hz (so 58FPS) and -6 at 144Hz (so 138FPS) if you enable ultra low latency mode.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
  18. Mineria

    Mineria Ancient Guru

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    Assuming that max 144fps and slightly below is put out at all time:
    How so when it states when just one of those 144 frames renders in, say, 6.8ms (146 FPS average) instead of 6.9ms (144 FPS average) at 144Hz?
    Theoretical you will never have any scanout frames, but we all know it will be virtual impossible.
    I did mention/recommend to use a framecap with G+V, which should be prioritized in the order ingame, RTSS and NVCP.
    Low Latency mode only works for specific cases, and should be set to ULTRA or ON accordingly.

    Personally I just settle for a stable max framerate, adjust my max refresh to align with that, enable G-Sync and V-Sync and cap within games.

    @tty8k
    I have never noticed V-Sync do anything for games with fps that doesn't hit the ceiling while G-Sync is enabled, if there should be any tearing it will be there regardless since V-Sync is not a foolproof way to prevent it within G-Sync range.
    I guess it depends on how spikey a given games fps acts.
    Anyway, there is really no point in not enabling V-SYNC together with G-SYNC unless the users is a competitive player on professional level and experiences less "lag" by doing so.
     
  19. tty8k

    tty8k Master Guru

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    I just made a quick test on GTA V with vsync ON and OFF on nvcp, fps capped at 142.
    The very top/bottom of the screen shows some tearing with vsync OFF even with a stable 142 fps in game.

    I've seen it in pretty much every game I play and it confirms to me what blurbusters says:

    Enabling the V-SYNC option is recommended to 100% prevent tearing in both the very upper (frametime variances) and very lower (frametime spikes) G-SYNC range.

    I noticed this issue ever since my first gsync monitor 5 years ago. I'm on my 4th now.
    Maybe I'll record a video of this when I have some time, one of my cameras can shoot 180fps FHD.
     
  20. RealNC

    RealNC Ancient Guru

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    I've seen some games tear in g-sync mode without vsync, even when capped to 120FPS at 144Hz. Usually it's hard to notice because the tearing happens at the very bottom of the screen. Like around line 1400 at 1440p. Just 40 pixels above the bottom. Because of this, it can very well be that I had tearing more often than I realize, but just didn't notice it because of its position on the screen.

    One game where I can reproduce this 100% of the time is Prey 2017. This game will tear heavily with g-sync if vsync is off. I had it in some other games as well, but not constantly. Sometimes it appeared to then just disappear again a bit later.

    After I upgraded my system (going from Sandy Bridge to Zen 2+) these became more rare though. Not sure why the CPU would affect this.

    Anyway, the TL;DR of all this is, if you use vsync OFF and see tearing with g-sync in some specific game, just turn on vsync. It's gonna fix it 100% and it won't increase input lag if you cap your FPS below the current refresh rate.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2021
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