Watercooling - whats the best of the best?

Discussion in 'Die-hard Overclocking & Case Modifications' started by Kenshai, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. vexed_uk

    vexed_uk Master Guru

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    GPU:
    Gigabyte 7800GT 510/1200
    which do u think would be the best soloution:
    a huge res in a fridge at -20 abment
    or a petler?

    me and kensai are thinking about the fridge idea,but ifs its gonna create more problems than just using a petler and spending some time sorting condenstaion out. then its abit of a waste of time.
     
  2. PrinceGaz

    PrinceGaz Maha Guru

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    Any part of the cooling system at below the dew-point of the environment it is in will result in condensation, it doesn't have to be below 0 degC for that to happen. The dew-point can easily be 10 degC or higher depending on the temperature and relative humidity of the room. Any air entering the case from that room will have the same dew-point which is why you must insulate all cooling methods that involve below ambient temperatures, even if they are above 0 degC.

    This page has a dew-point calculator where you can enter the room temperature and relative-humidity, to find what the dew-point is. Anything below that temperature in the air from that room (even if it has been heated by the case) will cause condensation. You'll see that the default it provides of 20 degC room-temp and 50% relative humidity gives a dew-point of just under 10 degC. That means if you had tubing in your computer at 5 degC, it would have condensation forming on it and water dripping if not properly insulated. Lower humidity lowers the dew-point, but anything below about 30% is bad for your health so that isn't an option. It is quite likely your room has a relative humidity of 60% or more in summer, and with a temperature of 25 degC that would make for a dew-point of nearly 17 degC -- even tubing at 15 degC would become wet then.

    Basically, if you are aiming for below ambient temperatures by any means, you must insulate all parts of the cooling system at below ambient temperature or condensation will form on it. And if you are prepared to go to the trouble of insulating the whole cooling system, you may as well explore the possibilities of peltiers for much lower temperatures. At least then you could use room-temp water and only the peltier and water-block assembly would be at below ambient temperatures and need insulating. But don't actually go down that route until you totally understand everything about installing and using them, and the requirements to prevent problems.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2005
  3. G L

    G L Don Juan

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    Yeah, I'd say just go with basic watercooling, then research your options. With TECs you can realistically shove the whole thing in a case, but it involves some estra costs for the TECs and an extra power supply.

    I have a feeling a resevoir just sitting in a refrigerator wouldn't be cooled sufficiently to make that big a difference, because you're depending on air to be the transmission medium... what you really want is for the cooling element to be submersed in the water. I could be wrong though, might still be a significant drop...
     
  4. PrinceGaz

    PrinceGaz Maha Guru

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    It would have to be the radiator that was placed in the below ambient temperature, after all that is the heat-exchanger which transfers all the heat from the water to the environemnt. Cooling the reservoir would have little effect if warm water was constantly being fed into it.

    It's worth noting that must fridges and freezers couldn't cope with the amount of constant heat given off by the average computer and would be basically useless, only air-conditioners provide the high-volume continuing cooling required (and also do so without any risk of condensation in the room, as all the condensation is disposed of by the air-conditioner itself).

    Water-cooling should either just be standard water-cooling without any sort of additional chilling, or a properly researched below-ambient temperature solution utilising peltiers and the like. Even running cold water from a tap over the radiator of a water-cooled system could cause condensation to form on the tubing if it takes it below the dew-point.
     

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