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Upscaling (1080p) DVD player running DVDs at half resolution

Discussion in 'The HTPC, HDTV & Ultra High Definition section' started by King Mustard, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. King Mustard

    King Mustard Member

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    GPU:
    GeForce GTX 1080 OC
    I have a Xenta VT-S205 1080p upscaling DVD player.

    It was purchased in December 2013 for £15 from Ebuyer.

    It hasn't been used in many years.

    I plugged it in today (via. several different HDMI cables) into a Samsung UE46ES5500 TV (a 2012 model). I've also tried two other HD TVs.

    All DVDs appear extremely pixelated. As in, below the standard DVD-Video resolution of 576p. They appear to be playing in half resolution.

    There aren't many settings to change but those that do exist are all set correctly:
    • Aspect Radio: 16:9
    • View Mode: Original (not Pan & Scan or Zoom)
    • TV System: PAL (I tried NTSC, just in case)
    • Video Out: HDMI
    • HD Resolution: 1080p (I've tried 1080i also)
    Anyone heard of anything like this happening before and what could be causing it?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2018
  2. Tree Dude

    Tree Dude Master Guru

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    GPU:
    Radeon R9 270X 2GB
    Do you have another player that looks better? What if you set it to not scale the image and simply send the 480p/576p resolution instead?

    "Upscaling" DVD players are mostly marketing. Your TV is 1080p, that is the only resolution is displays. So the image is always being scaled, the question is what device is doing the scaling. You could argue scaling at the point the video is read from the disc would yield a better result, but you can have a really crappy scaler in a DVD player and a really good one in your TV and then that wouldn't be the case. The best thing about upscaling DVD players is you get HDMI out and the image is never converted to analog, which is what really sets the player apart.
     

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