Toshiba Will Not Release New 15K RPM HDDs

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Mar 21, 2017.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

    Messages:
    42,495
    Likes Received:
    10,288
    GPU:
    AMD | NVIDIA
    It seems that production of the fastest 15k rpm HDDs are on the decline, Toshiba sees no reason to release news HDDs with that rotational. In a news-item website Golem reports about this news, there i...

    Toshiba Will Not Release New 15K RPM HDDs
     
  2. vbetts

    vbetts Don Vincenzo Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,128
    Likes Received:
    1,703
    GPU:
    GTX 1080 Ti
    I am almost not surprised, 15k drives are not cheap and with SSD reliability on the rise well....The choice is simple.
     
  3. Silva

    Silva Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    806
    GPU:
    Asus RX560 4G
    I understand why they existed before SSD's become price reachable.
    Now there's no point, anyone wanting performance will get an SSD and for storage an HDD.
     
  4. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    6,203
    Likes Received:
    2,516
    GPU:
    HIS R9 290
    Makes sense. Faster HDDs are more power hungry, noisy, hot, expensive, and failure-prone than their slower counterparts. Meanwhile, you could buy an SSD for a similar price and get something more efficient, quieter, cooler, smaller, and reliable than the slower HDDs. Seems like a no-brainer.

    Nowadays, you buy an HDD when you just need oodles of terabytes for a low price. Most things that need so much space don't care much about seek times. With RAID1, sequential read times are pretty fast on high-capacity drives.
     

  5. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    8,116
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    GPU:
    2070 Super
    Enterprise machines running RAID1 - does that even exist?
     
  6. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    6,203
    Likes Received:
    2,516
    GPU:
    HIS R9 290
    Why wouldn't they? RAID1 is mirroring - redundancy is crucial in servers.

    Are you sure you're not confusing RAID0 or JBOD? Because those are pretty stupid to use in servers.
     
  7. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    8,116
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    GPU:
    2070 Super
    :thumbup: Oh yeah, I thought stripping, RAID0.

    Is been a while since I've ran RAID...
     
  8. skypx

    skypx Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    GTX 780 SLI
    I'm sorry but I'm still stuck on who wrote the the article. "news HHDs" Wow!
     
  9. yasamoka

    yasamoka Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    4,857
    Likes Received:
    246
    GPU:
    EVGA GTX 1080Ti SC
    Get out of here.
     
  10. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    6,643
    Likes Received:
    99
    GPU:
    XFX RX 480 RS 4 GB
    Hard drives might be available in 8 TB and 10 TB etc sizes now, but the cost of the sizes that most people would be interesting in, 3 TB and 4 TB, haven't really dropped in the last couple of years.
     

  11. flashmozzg

    flashmozzg Member Guru

    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    12
    GPU:
    R9 290 4GB @ 947/1250
    RAID1 is a pure choice for due to to bad resource usage (to much wasted space, not much benefit). Enterprise usually uses RAID 5 or 6 (sometimes in combination with 0).
     
  12. waltc3

    waltc3 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    464
    GPU:
    AMD 50th Ann 5700XT
    Yes,, SSDs are the future. Right now, the only thing going for platter drives is cost, making hard drives the optimum choice for storage needs that don't require top speed access--1TB 7200 rpm WD blues are $50 in most places; put two together in RAID 0 for $100 for 2 TB's (which I have installed at home right now, along with an SSD and a 2TB AHCI single drive). I was never a fan of the old 10k rotational platters, either. An interesting factoid: I've been running RAID 0 in a variety of platforms over the last 15 years (as varied you may imagine) and never had a single drive failure in a RAID 0 setup. In fact, the only drive failures I've *ever* had came with drives configured to run as IDE...;) But the drive doesn't care how you run it; it runs the same in RAID 0 as it does in IDE/AHCI mode. Probability failure for a RAID 0 drive is exactly the same as for any IDE/AHCI drive (of course.) Weird, how much superstition still revolves around RAID 0, in this day and age.
     

Share This Page