Third party Graphics Card hardware database

Discussion in 'MSI AfterBurner Overclock Application Discussion' started by Unwinder, May 30, 2015.

  1. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    Please follow this guide if you want to add custom design non-MSI graphics card to third party hardware database. If you're simply searching for the most recent version of the database, grab it in post #2.

    Hardware database format reference v1.2

    1. Hardware database concepts

    MSI Afterburner uses hardware databases concepts to implement voltage control support on a wide range of graphics cards and at the same time keep extremely fast and efficient application startup performance. Database concepts mean that each voltage control capable graphics card supported by MSI Afterburner is being uniquely identified inside the application by personal entry in hardware database. The database entry specific to each card define exact model of voltage controller, define controller’s unique hardware location address and provide full set of additional calibration information specific to the voltage controller model. So MSI Afterburner doesn’t need to perform full hardware scanning, it doesn’t need to perform heuristic detection of all possible controllers to select proper voltage control codepath. Such approach gives software voltage control layer the maximum safety, reduces the risk of incorrect detection of voltage controller model to zero and gives MSI Afterburner huge advantage in application startup performance comparing to tools performing full hardware scan at each startup. However, database approach doesn’t allow the application to control voltage on unknown cards with non-reference voltage control circuit.
    We ship MSI Afterburner with hardware databases providing voltage control support on 100% reference design AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards and on custom design MSI cards labeled with “Voltage control” logo. However, rich set of voltage controllers supported by MSI Afterburner core allows implementing voltage control support on many custom design cards from third party hardware vendors. For example, custom design ASUS GTX 980 STRIX or EGVA GTX 780 Classified series cards use the same voltage controllers as MSI Lightning series graphics cards, so it is possible to add such custom design ASUS and EVGA to the database and unlock voltage control for it. We don’t include such cards into official databases distributed with application, however we introduce original concepts of third party hardware database, which can be downloaded separately and attached to our application to extend voltage control functionality on third party custom design graphics cards. Third party hardware database format is open, so enthusiasts can add new cards to it and share the result with the community. Please follow this guide if you are going to edit third party hardware database.

    2. Hardware database format

    Third party hardware database is ASCII text file defining independent voltage control scenarios for different models of graphics cards. The database must have “;OEM” signature in the very beginning, otherwise the application won’t start and display error telling you that some components are missing or corrupted. The database format is derived from standard INI file format, so it is composed of multiple sections containing different fields. Each section inside the database identifies unique graphics card model or the set of similar models, if wildcards are used in the section name. Graphics card section names have the following format:

    [VEN_XXXX&DEV_XXXX&SUBSYS_XXXXXXXX&REV_XX]

    where VEN_XXXX part is graphics card vendor ID, DEV_XXXX part is graphics card device ID, SUBSYS_XXXXXXXX part is graphics card subsystem ID and REV_XX part is graphics card revision number.
    Vendor ID includes 4 hexadecimal digits, e.g. VEN_10DE for NVIDIA graphics card. Device ID includes 4 hexadecimal digits, e.g. DEV_1004 for NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780. Subsystem ID includes 8 hexadecimal digits and defines vendor specific sub-model name, e.g. SUBSYS_17883842 for EVGA GTX 780 Classified. Revision number includes 2 hexadecimal digits, however different revisions of the same model normally use the same voltage controller, so it is recommended to avoid specifying revision directly in the section name and use wildcard symbol “?” instead to define one section for all possible revisions, e.g. REV_??. Wildcard symbol can be also used to define one section for a set of graphics cards models if necessary, for example [VEN_10DE&DEV_1004&SUBSYS_????3842&REV_??] section define settings for all possible sub-models of EVGA GTX 780 series graphics cards. Use wildcards with caution and only when it is really necessary, for example [VEN_10DE&DEV_1004&SUBSYS_????????&REV_??] section define settings for all NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 series cards, so specifying such section inside third party database will effectively redefine MSI Afterburner’s internal database settings for reference design NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 series graphics cards.
    You may easily extract section name for your graphics card by clicking <i> button in MSI Afterburner, each GPU GUID displayed in MSI Afterburner information window is exactly what you are searching for.

    2.1. [VEN_XXXX&DEV_XXXX&SUBSYS_XXXXXXXX&REV_XX] section format

    This section defines settings for the graphics card model uniquely identified by section name or the set of graphics card models if the section name includes wildcard symbols. The settings include optional graphics card model name, voltage controller model, controller hardware location address and other helper settings specific to voltage controller model. For example:

    [VEN_1002&DEV_6798&SUBSYS_99991043&REV_??]

    Desc = ASUS ARES II
    VDDC_CHL8228_Detection = 6:30h
    VDDC_CHL8228_Defaults = C6 9F
    VDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback = 1
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Detection = 6:30h
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Defaults = CD BF
    MVDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback = 1

    Desc field is optional and it can be specified to display custom name for a graphics card in MSI Afterburner GUI, e.g. ASUS ARES II in this example. If this field is not specified, MSI Afterburner will display graphics card name as it is reported by Windows. Please keep in mind that graphics card name is displayed in limited space in some MSI Afterburner skins, so try to keep it as compact as it is possible and always test the result.
    VDDC_CHL8228_Detection field defines the first voltage controller detection information. Controller detection information includes voltage controller target, model and hardware location address. Voltage controller target in this example is VDDC, which means that we’re defining settings for core voltage controller. Voltage controller model is CHL8228, and voltage controller location is I2C bus 6, device address 30h.
    VDDC_CHL8228_Defaults field defines CHL8228 controller specific settings for core voltage controller, in this example we’re telling MSI Afterburner that core voltage is adjusted by CHL8228 voltage control loop 1 VID LUT register C6 and default VID for this register is equal to 9F.
    VDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback field defines additional CHL8228 controller specific settings for core voltage controller, we’re telling MSI Afterburner that we want to see VID readback (i.e. programmed target voltage) on core voltage monitoring graph instead of real voltage readback.
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Detection field defines the second voltage controller detection information. Controller detection information includes voltage controller target, model and hardware location address. Voltage controller target in this example is MVDDC, which means that we’re defining settings for memory voltage controller. Voltage controller model is CHL8228, and voltage controller location is I2C bus 6, device address 30h.
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Defaults field defines CHL8228 controller specific settings for memory voltage controller, in this example we’re telling MSI Afterburner that memory voltage is adjusted by CHL8228 voltage control loop 2 VID LUT register CD and default VID for this register is equal to BF.
    MVDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback field defines additional CHL8228 controller specific settings for core voltage controller, we’re telling MSI Afterburner that we want to see VID readback (i.e. programmed target voltage) on memory voltage monitoring graph instead of real voltage readback.

    Voltage controller detection fields are the only unified fields for all models of controllers. Detection fields have the following format:

    <target>_<model>_Detection = [<i2c_bus_filter>:]<i2c_device_filter>

    where <target> is voltage controller target, which can be set to VDDC (for core voltage controller detection), MVDDC (for memory voltage controller detection), VDDCI or PEXVDD (for auxiliary voltage controller detection). VDDCI and PEXVDD target definitions are functionally equal and both map the voltage controller to Aux voltage slider in MSI Afterburner user interface, different target names are used just to improve internal database readability (VDDCI on AMD cards, PEXVDD on NVIDIA graphics cards). <model> is a model of voltage controller, which can be set to CHL8214, CHL8228, CHL8266, CHL8318, IR3567B, IR3595A, L6788A, NCP4206, NCP81022, UP1637, UP6204, UP6208, UP6218, UP6262, UP6266, VT1165, VT1556 or Generic. <i2c_bus_filter> specify the range of I2C buses where the controller can reside, for example it can be set to “3” if the controller can be located on I2C bus 3 only, “3-5” if it can be in bus 3 to 5 range or “3,5” if it can be on bus 3 or 5. <i2c_device_filter> specify the range of 7-bit I2C device addresses where the controller can reside. Similar to bus filter, you can specify exact device address, range of addresses or a few comma separated addresses. If you don’t specify bus filter and use device filter only, MSI Afterburner will search for the controller on all I2C buses available on this graphics card until matching I2C device is found. In most cases it is safe to specify device filter only, however, some controllers (e.g. UP6262) have no internal identification register and reside in the same address space as monitor DDC. So in this case it is absolutely necessary to specify both bus and device filters in order to detect the controller properly.
    It is allowed to specify a few voltage controller detection fields for the same voltage controller target (e.g. for VDDC) with different voltage controller models inside one section if some graphics card model can use different models of voltage controllers. For example reference design ATI RADEON 4870 series cards can use either VT1165 or L6788A to control core voltage. So database section for this graphics card contains both VDDC_VT1165_Detection and VDDC_L6788A_Defaults fields.
    The rest voltage controller related fields, such as VDDC_CHL8228_Defaults or VDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback mentioned in this example are specific to model of voltage controller and will be discussed further in controller model specific chapters.

    2.1.1. CHL8214 voltage controller

    CHL8214 is a dual-loop controller, which can control up to two voltage outputs independently. CHL8214 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. CHL8214 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in full 7-bit I2C device address range. The controller is identified by register 9Ch (must be equal to 43h) and register 8Ch (must be equal to 16h). Model specific settings for CHL8214 include the following:

    <target>_CHL8214_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in 43h - 4Ah range for the first voltage loop and in 4Bh - 4Eh range for the second voltage loop.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    Implementation note: This controller can be invisible in standard I2C dump, if it is located in upper I2C address space. In this case upper I2C address space need to be scanned additionally. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.2. CHL8228 voltage controller

    CHL8228 is dual-loop controller, which can control up to two voltage outputs independently. CHL8228 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. CHL8228 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback and real monitoring forms, which means that it can report both target programmed and real monitored voltages. CHL8228 codepath can be also use for compatible CHL8225A and CHL8225B controllers.
    This controller can reside in full 7-bit I2C device address range. The controller is identified by register 8Ch (can be equal to 03h for CHL8225A, 04h for CHL8225B or 0Eh for CHL8228). Model specific settings for CHL8228 include the following:

    <target>_CHL8228_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in C6h - C9h range for the first voltage loop and in CAh - CDh range for the second voltage loop.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    <target>_CHL8228_VIDReadback = <readback_mode>

    where <readback_mode> is controlling VID readback mode. When it is set to 1 VID readback mode is enabled and the voltage monitored by this controller is a target voltage programmed by VID. When it is set to 0 VID readback mode is disabled and real voltage is being monitored by this controller.

    Implementation note: This controller can be invisible in standard I2C dump, if it is located in upper I2C address space. In this case upper I2C address space need to be scanned additionally. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.3. CHL8266 voltage controller

    CHL8266 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. CHL8266 supports voltage control in output voltage override form only. CHL8266 supports output voltage monitoring in real form, which means that it can report real monitored voltage only.
    This controller can reside in fixed 46h device address only. The controller has no identification registers and no model specific settings.

    2.1.4. CHL8318 voltage controller

    CHL8318 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. CHL8318 supports voltage control in output voltage override and offset forms. CHL8318 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in fixed 42h, 44h, 46h, 70h, 72h, 74h or 76h device addresses only. The controller has no identification registers. Model specific settings for CHL8318 include the following:

    <target>_CHL8318_Type = <control_type>

    where <control_type> can be set to 0 for fixed output voltage override or 1 for applying offset to output voltage.

    Implementation note: This controller can be invisible in standard I2C dump, if it is located in upper I2C address space. In this case upper I2C address space need to be scanned additionally. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.5. IR3567B voltage controller

    IR3567B is dual-loop controller, which can control up to two voltage outputs independently. IR3567B supports voltage control in output voltage override and offset forms. IR3567B supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only. IR3567B codepath can be also used for compatible IR356x and IR3570 family controllers.
    This controller can reside in 28h - 46h device address range only. The controller is identified by register 92h (must be equal to 43h). Model specific settings for IR3567B include the following:

    <target>_IR3567B_Type = <control_type>

    where <control_type> can be set to 0 for fixed output voltage override or 1 for applying offset to output voltage.

    <target>_IR3567B_Output = <output_index>

    where <output_index> can be set to 0 to control the first voltage loop or 1 to control the second voltage loop. This setting is optional, MSI Afterburner defaults to the first loop if output index is not specified.

    2.1.6. IR3595A voltage controller

    IR3595A is dual-loop controller, which can control up to two voltage outputs independently. IR3595A supports voltage control in output voltage override form only. IR3595A supports output voltage monitoring in real form, which means that it can report real monitored voltage only. This controller can reside in full 7-bit I2C device address range. The controller is identified by registers FCh (must be equal to 49h), FDh (must be equal to 52h) and FBh (must be equal to 27h, 28h, 29h or 2Ah). Model specific settings for IR3595A include the following:

    <target>_IR3595A_Output = <output_index>

    where <output_index> can be set to 0 to control the first voltage loop or 1 to control the second voltage loop. This setting is optional, MSI Afterburner defaults to the first loop if output index is not specified.

    2.1.7. L6788A voltage controller

    L6788A is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. L6788A supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states.
    This controller can reside in fixed 40h device address only. The controller is identified by register D0h (must be equal to 53h). Model specific settings for L6788A include the following:

    <target>_L6788A_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in D4h – D7h range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    2.1.8. NCP4206 voltage controller

    NCP4206 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. NCP4206 supports voltage control in output voltage override form only. NCP4206 supports output voltage monitoring in real form, which means that it can report real monitored voltage only.
    This controller can reside in fixed 20h device address only. The controller is identified by register 99h (must be equal to 41h). The controller has no model specific settings.

    Implementation note: This controller is invisible in standard I2C dump tool due to its architecture specific and it needs to be dumped using special parameters of polled directly. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.9. NCP81022 voltage controller

    NCP81022 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. NCP81022 supports voltage control in offset form only. NCP81022 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 20h - 27h device address range only. The controller is identified by 2-byte register 99h (must be equal to 001Ah) and 2-byte register 9Ah (must be equal to 1022h). The controller has no model specific settings.

    2.1.10. UP1637 voltage controller

    UP1637 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. UP1637 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. UP1637 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 46h - 47h device address range only. The controller is identified by register D0h (must be equal to 1Eh). Model specific settings for UP1637 include the following:

    <target>_UP1637_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in D4h – D7h range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    2.1.11. UP6204 voltage controller

    UP6204 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. UP6204 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. UP6204 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in fixed 40h device address only. The controller is identified by register D0h (must be equal to 11h). Model specific settings for UP6204 include the following:

    <target>_UP6204_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in D4h – D7h range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    2.1.12. UP6208 voltage controller

    UP6208 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. UP6208 supports voltage control in offset form only. UP6208 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 45h - 47h device address range only. The controller is identified by register B2h (must be equal to 01h) and register 0Fh (must be equal to 11h). The controller has no model specific settings.

    2.1.13. UP6218 voltage controller

    UP6218 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage. UP6218 supports voltage control in offset form only. UP6218 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 45h - 47h device address range only. The controller is identified by register B2h (must be equal to 0Eh) and register 1Dh (lower 6 bits must be equal to 02h or 03h depending on the controller revision). The controller has no model specific settings.

    2.1.14. UP6262 voltage controller

    UP6262 is triple-loop controller, which can control up to three voltage outputs independently. UP6262 supports voltage control in offset form only. UP6262 doesn’t support output voltage monitoring in any form.
    This controller can reside in fixed 30h device address only. The controller has no identification registers. Model specific settings for UP6262 include the following:

    <target>_UP6262_Output = <output_index>

    where <output_index> can be set to 0 to control the first voltage loop, 1 to control the second voltage loop or 2 to control the third voltage loop. This setting is optional, MSI Afterburner defaults to the first loop if output index is not specified.

    <target>_UP6262_R1 = <r1_resistance>

    where <r1_resistance> specify R1 resistor resistance (in Ohm) for voltage control loop. This value is set to zero by default and must be set to non-zero value in the database.

    2.1.15. UP6266 voltage controller

    UP6266 is single loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. UP6266 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. UP6266 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 51h - 53h device address range only. The controller is identified by register D0h (must be equal to 12h). Model specific settings for UP6266 include the following:

    <target>_UP6266_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in D4h – D7h range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    2.1.16. VT1165 voltage controller

    VT1165 is single-loop voltage controller, which can control only one voltage output. VT1165 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. VT1165 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 70h - 71h device address range only. The controller is identified by register 1Ah (must be equal to 0Ah). Model specific settings for VT1165 include the following:

    <target>_VT1165_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in 15h – 18h range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    Implementation note: This controller is invisible in standard I2C dump, because it is located in upper I2C address space. Its’ I2C address space needs to be scanned directly. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.17. VT1556 voltage controller

    VT1556 is single-loop controller, which can control only one voltage output. VT1556 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. VT1556 supports output voltage monitoring in VID readback form, which means that it can report target programmed voltage only.
    This controller can reside in 70h - 73h device address range only. The controller is identified by register 1Ah (must be equal to 02h). Model specific settings for VT1556 include the following:

    <target>_VT1556_Defaults = <vid_lut_register_address> <default_vid>

    where <vid_lut_register_address> is the address of VID register controlling voltage for 3D performance state, the address can be in 94h – 9Bh range.
    <default_vid> specify default value for previously defined VID register.

    Implementation note: This controller is invisible in standard I2C dump, because it is located in upper I2C address space. Its’ I2C address space needs to be scanned directly. Refer to chapter 4 to get more detailed info.

    2.1.18. Generic voltage controller

    Generic is a special fake controller name allowing MSI Afterburner to use display driver’s VID based voltage control API instead of direct access to specific external I2C voltage controller. In this case voltage control range can be seriously limited by display driver, but this mode is the only case for many reference design cards with cost down voltage controllers without I2C programming support. Additionally, some modern graphics processors are equipped with integrated on-die programmable voltage controllers (e.g. SMC microcontroller on AMD Fiji) and direct access to such integrated controllers is mapped to Generic controller as well. Voltage controller detection field for this controller supports only VDDC as the target and uses simple boolean variable to enable/disable it instead of I2C bus and device location info, e.g.

    VDDC_Generic_Detection = 1

    enables voltage control via display driver and

    VDDC_Generic_Detection = 2

    enables voltage control via integrated on-die voltage controller. Generic voltage control has the lowest priority, so when you specify generic and some other controller models for the same card MSI Afterburner first try to use direct access to other external controllers and fall back to generic controller only if no other external controllers found onboard.

    3. Helper tools

    MSI Afterburner contains built-in helper tools aimed to simplify the process of hardware database creation and allowing you to detect and diagnose the voltage controller before adding it to hardware database. The next chapters discuss helper tools in details.

    3.1. I2C dump tool

    I2C dump tool is intended for automated scanning of all devices residing on all I2C buses of each GPU installed in the system. The first register of each scanned I2C device is being polled, if the device reply to polling then dump of 256 byte registers is saved into the dump. I2C dump tool is activated via the command line with the following switch:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd[[<i2c_bus>],[<i2c_device>],[<register>]]

    where <i2c_bus> is I2C bus number, <i2c_device> is 7-bit I2C device address and <register> is address of I2C device register to be polled when checking I2C device availability. Optional <i2c_bus> and <i2c_device> parameters allow scanning required device address on all I2C buses or desired I2C bus only. When I2C bus and device address are not specified I2C dump tool is scanning all available I2C buses and 7-bit I2C address range starting from 00h up to 4Fh inclusive. Optional <register> parameter allows dumping state of some sophisticated I2C devices with unreadable register 0 (e.g. NCP4206).

    3.2. I2C read/write console

    I2C read / write console is intended for reading registers from or writing registers to a specific I2C device. You can read data from a register of specific I2C device using the following command line switch:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /ri<i2c_bus>,<i2c_device>,<register>

    where <i2c_bus> is I2C bus number, <i2c_device> is 7-bit I2C device address and <register> is register address
    In addition to read operations you may also write data to a register of specific I2C device using the following command line switch:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /wi<i2c_bus>,<i2c_device>,<register>,<data>

    where <i2c_bus> is I2C bus number, <i2c_device> is 7-bit I2C device address, <register> is register address and <data> is a data to be written to the register
    Besides direct data write there a few additional operations, allowing you to read data from I2C device register, apply simple logical operations (AND, OR or XOR) to it and write it back to the register. The following command line switch read register form specific I2C device, apply bitwise AND operation to it using data you specify then write it back to the register:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /ai<i2c_bus>,<i2c_device>,<register>,<data>

    Similar to the previous command, the following commands do almost the same but use bitwise OR and XOR operations instead or AND operation:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /oi<i2c_bus>,<i2c_device>,<register>,<data>
    MSIAfterburner.exe /xi<i2c_bus>,<i2c_device>,<register>,<data>

    The commands in I2C read / write console can be queued, which mean that you can perform series of read / write operations in one command. Please take a note that all commands apply to GPU selected as a master GPU in MSI Afterburner properties, however you can use GPU selection command /sg<gpu_index> before I2C read and write commands to redirect them to desired GPU. <gpu_index> is zero based and it affects all read and write commands in the line until the next GPU selection command is met.
    Also take a note that all I2C read and write commands work with 1-byte I2C device registers by default. However, you may use access mode forcing command /fm2 to force 2-byte register access mode and /fm1 command to force 1-byte register access mode back if necessary. Similar to GPU selection commands, access mode forcing command also affects all read and write commands in the line until the next access mode forcing command is met.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  2. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    4. Hardware database creation steps, hints and tricks

    • The very first thing you have to do before trying to add new card to third party hardware database is to determine exact model of voltage controller chip. Some graphics card reviewers pay attention to it, for example you may find info about voltage controller model in detailed TechPowerUp graphics card reviews, e.g. this review is telling you that custom design EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified card uses CHL8318 controller.

    • If you cannot find info about voltage controller model in any online reviews, try to examine PCB and visually identify model of controller chip.

    • If you identified voltage controller model and it is listed as supported by MSI afterburner in chapter 2.1, proceed with the next steps. If you identified voltage controller model but it is not listed as supported by MSI afterburner in chapter 2.1, then sadly you cannot proceed further with unlocking support for it in MSI Afterburner. Some voltage controller models (e.g. RT8802A or NCP81174) are cost down controller models with no I2C support, so there are absolutely no chances to see support for such controllers in future versions of MSI Afterburner. Support for other unsupported programmable controllers can be added to MSI Afterburner in future versions, but only if MSI start using it on some custom design MSI graphics cards.

    • Use I2C dump tool to scan I2C devices installed on your graphics card. If you already know voltage controller model, you may use the dump to find the controller location address and it is rather easy task. Otherwise you’ll need to analyze all devices found inside the dump and compare each device with each possible voltage controller model identification info. For example, let’s assume that you know that your controller is CHL8228. Let’s peek into the chapter about this controller. You’ll see there that CHL8228 controller may reside in any address and that it can be identified by values 03h, 04h or 0Eh in register 8Ch. Now examine all I2C devices in the dump and select device matching with our address selection (can be any in our case) and identification criteria. In our example there is only one device inside the dump located on bus 6 device 30h and it is our victim, because register 8Ch is indeed equal to 0Eh (row 9 contain registers 80h – 8Fh, column 13 in this row in register 8Ch):

    Scanning GPU VEN_1002&DEV_6798&SUBSYS_99991043&REV_00&BUS_3&DEV _0&FN_0...
    ...
    Scanning I2C bus 6...
    Probing device 00...
    Invalid device
    ...
    Probing device 30...
    25 CA 78 61 DB 5B 01 30 A0 08 80 00 87 7F CF 96
    A0 03 AA 06 A0 00 00 00 00 A4 89 9A 28 00 E8 A1
    28 4B DB DD 30 55 00 00 B9 B9 99 05 05 11 AA 22
    44 33 C5 00 AA 38 39 90 53 2D 00 00 00 3A 01 80
    9F CF 00 00 4B 3E 3F 3F 3F 3E 3E 3F 71 F0 F1 80
    D9 7F D9 81 D9 8B 02 1E D8 00 D0 97 BA 03 B8 20
    F0 30 F0 29 19 00 00 00 00 00 00 F8 7B 00 00 00
    00 03 00 03 51 00 CF FF 00 00 A0 EA FF 00 00 68
    D9 00 D0 4B D9 04 D0 D7 B9 FF BB 56 0E 00 01 FF
    02 07 00 00 C0 00 00 BB 00 00 12 1F 1F AD 50 00
    00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 03 00 00 03 FF 9F 00
    00 00 0F 00 00 00 00 FF FF 88 88 01 0A 0A FF 88
    01 01 01 00 00 C0 9F 9F 9F 9F BF BF BF BF 01 80
    00 00 00 00 80 33 00 00 08 00 01 00 00 00 00 00
    00 00 00 15 15 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00 01 00 00
    00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00


    Keep in mind that in some cases default I2C dump may contain no data required for voltage controller identification. It can be the case if voltage controller reside in upper I2C addresses (5Fh and higher), which are not scanned by default I2C dump scanner. For example if we’re searching for CHL8318 controller and know that it can reside in fixed 70h, 72h, 74h and 76h addresses, we can scan those addresses directly with the following commands:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd,70
    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd,72
    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd,74
    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd,76

    In some cases I2C device can be completely invisible to I2C dump tool because the first register of device polled by the scanner of I2C dump tool can be unreadable due to device architecture specifics. For example it applies to NCP4206 voltage controllers. So if we’re searching for NCP4206 and it is not found inside the dump, we can specify additional parameters in I2C dump command line to force it to poll different register when checking I2C device availability, e.g. NCP4206 identification register 99h:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /i2cd,,99

    Alternately, we can poll the controller directly via I2C read / write console. For example the following commands poll identification register 99h of NCP4206 device address 20h. We’re expecting to see 41h for NCP4206 according to info from the chapter about NCP4206 voltage controller. So, let’s assume that we poll this register and address on 2 neighbor I2C buses:

    MSIAfterburner.exe /ri3,20,99 /ri4,20,99

    And the output result is:

    I2C 03 20 99 : 41
    I2C 04 20 99 : invalid

    which means that our NCP4206 is indeed located on I2C bus 3, device address 20h

    • Once you determine model and location of your voltage controller (i.e. I2C bus number and I2C device address), you can try to add it to third party hardware database and test changes in MSI Afterburner. To simplify the process, you may create new empty database file and perform all changes inside it instead of working with massive existing database file. So start from creating ASCII text file called MSIAfterburner.oem2 inside the root application folder and paste the following text inside it:

    ;OEM

    [VEN_XXXX&DEV_XXXX&SUBSYS_XXXXXXXX&REV_??]

    Desc = My card

    Don’t forget the “;OEM” signature in the very beginning, otherwise application will not recognize it as valid database file, and use correct section name uniquely identifying your graphics card, i.e. specify the real vendor, device and subsystem IDs of your graphics card instead of XXXX. Restart MSI Afterburner and if you did everything properly, it will unlock new item in the list of voltage control modes available in “General” tab in application properties: “third party” mode should become available for selection. Once you select it, MSI Afterburner will offer you to restart application and if you did everything properly, you’ll see your card detected as “My card” in MSI Afterburner after restart. As you probably noticed, “My card” is a text description, which we specify in Desc field of newly created database entry, it is the easiest way to ensure that we added new database entry properly.
    Now you can change Desc field to the real name of your card try to add voltage control detection field to new database entry. For example, if we’re creating database entry for a card, which control core voltage via CHL8228 on I2C bus 6 device address 30h, we add the following:

    VDDC_CHL8228_Detection = 6:30h

    For VDDC voltage control on NVIDIA graphics cards it is also recommended to forcibly disable generic voltage control via display
    driver. Otherwise MSI Afterburner may fall back to generic voltage control mode if you specify VDDC controller detection field
    improperly, so it will be harder for you to notice typos in the database if you make any. Generic voltage control mode can be
    disabled by adding the following line to new database entry:

    VDDC_Generic_Detection = 0

    Database creation ends at this step for many voltage controllers having no controller specific settings. However, some models of voltage controllers require some more calibration information to be specified inside the database. Additional model specific settings are documented in controller specific chapters of this document, so carefully examine the chapter related to your voltage controller model.
    In out example with CHL8228, such model specific setting is VDDC_CHL8228_Defaults field, which is selecting proper voltage control loop and LUT register for it. According to the chapter 2.1.2, dual-loop CHL8228 supports internal lookup table (LUT) of voltages for all possible GPU power states, which means that it allows controlling 3D performance state voltage independently of the rest performance states. This means that in order to provide independent voltage control for 3D performance state, we must add to the database exact address of LUT register, storing voltage for 3D performance state in CHL8228 on this card. The database should also specify default value of this LUT register to allow MSI Afterburner to restore defaults properly, when necessary.
    Finding address of LUT register with voltage for 3D performance state is rather simple task. For example, according to the chapter 2.1.2, LUT registers for the first CHL8228 voltage control loop are C6h - C9h. So we can simply try the database with each of 4 possible LUT registers to find one mapped to 3D performance state. Alternately, you can select LUT register for 3D performance state via VID decoding, but it requires deeper understanding of voltage controller functioning principles.
    Finding default value of LUT register is also rather simple task. Once you determine address of LUT register, you may disable all voltage control tools in the system, perform cold system boot then use I2C read / write console to read default value of this register.

    • Finally, share all data you’ve collected (full model name of your custom design graphics card, voltage controller mode, database section name for your graphics card, I2C dumps, results of direct polling of I2C devices, or even complete new database entry for it) with us in Guru3D forums. We’ll verify it and add it to public version of third party hardware database, if possible.

    Third party hardware database v1.5, last modified on 15.12.2015.

    Supported cards:

    - ASUS ARES II
    - ASUS GTX 780 DirectCU II OC
    - ASUS 970 STRIX
    - ASUS 980 STRIX
    - EVGA GTX 780 Classified
    - EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified KPE
    - EVGA GTX 980 Ti Classified
    - KFA2 GTX 980 Ti HOF (XOC BIOS)
    - Gigabyte R9 270 (GV-R927OC-2GD)
    - PowerColor HD6870 (AX6870 1GBD5-2DH)
    - Sapphire Dual-X R9 280X

    Instructions:

    - Create empty ASCII text file called MSIAfterburner.oem2 in the root folder of MSI Afterburner and paste text database contents in this file.
    - Restart MSI Afterburner, open <General> tab in properties and set <Voltage control mode> to <third party>.

    Disclaimer:

    Third party hardware database and third party voltage control mode in MSI Afterburner are supplied "as-is", with no official support from MSI or Guru3D side. MSI and Guru3D assume no liability for damages, direct or consequential, which may result from the use of it.

    Code:
    ;OEM
    
    ; Version 1.5, last edited on 15.12.2015
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design ASUS ATI series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6798&SUBSYS_99991043&REV_??]
    
    ; ASUS ARES II
    
    Desc                                    = ASUS ARES II
    VDDC_CHL8228_Detection			= 6:30h
    VDDC_CHL8228_Defaults			= C6 9F
    VDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback		= 1
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Detection			= 6:30h
    MVDDC_CHL8228_Defaults			= CD BF
    MVDDC_CHL8228_VIDReadback		= 1
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design ASUS NVIDIA series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_1004&SUBSYS_84691043&REV_??]
    
    ; ASUS GTX 780 DirectCU II OC
    
    Desc 					= ASUS GTX 780 DirectCU II OC
    VDDC_Generic_Detection 			= 0
    VDDC_CHL8318_Detection			= 44h
    VDDC_CHL8318_Type			= 1
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_13C2&SUBSYS_85091043&REV_??]
    
    ; ASUS GTX 970 STRIX
    
    Desc                                    = ASUS GTX 970 STRIX
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_CHL8318_Detection			= 74h
    VDDC_CHL8318_Type			= 1
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_13C0&SUBSYS_85061043&REV_??]
    
    ; ASUS GTX 980 STRIX
    
    Desc                                    = ASUS GTX 980 STRIX
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_CHL8318_Detection			= 74h
    VDDC_CHL8318_Type			= 1
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design EVGA NVIDIA series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_1004&SUBSYS_17883842&REV_??]
    
    ; EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Classified
    
    Desc                                    = EVGA GTX 780 Classified
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_CHL8318_Detection			= 46h
    VDDC_CHL8318_Type			= 1
                                               
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_100A&SUBSYS_38883842&REV_??]
    
    ; EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti Classified K|NGP|N Edition
    
    Desc                                    = EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified KPE
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_CHL8318_Detection			= 46h
    VDDC_CHL8318_Type			= 1
    
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_17C8&SUBSYS_49983842&REV_??]
    
    ; EVGA GTX 980 Ti Classified
    
    Desc                                    = EVGA GTX 980 Ti Classified
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_IR3595A_Detection			= 08h
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design GALAX / KFA2 NVIDIA series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_10DE&DEV_17C8&SUBSYS_11511B4C&REV_??]
    
    ; KFA2 GTX 980 Ti HOF with XOC BIOS
    
    Desc                                    = KFA2 GTX 980 Ti HOF
    VDDC_Generic_Detection                  = 0
    VDDC_IR3595A_Detection			= 08h
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design Gigabyte ATI series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6811&SUBSYS_226C1458&REV_??]
    
    ; Gigabyte GV-R927OC-2GD 
    
    Desc					= Gigabyte R9 270
    VDDC_IR3567B_Detection			= 6:30h
    VDDC_IR3567B_Output			= 0 
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design PowerColor ATI series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6738&SUBSYS_23051787&REV_??]
    
    ; PowerColor AX6870 1GBD5-2DH
    
    Desc					= PowerColor HD6870
    VDDC_uP6266_Detection                   = 51h
    VDDC_uP6266_Defaults			= D7 77
    
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    ; Custom design Sapphire ATI series
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6798&SUBSYS_3001174B&REV_??]
    
    ; Sapphire Radeon Dual-X R9 280X
    
    Desc 					= Sapphire Dual-X R9 280X
    VDDC_NCP4206_Detection 			= 20h
    VDDC_NCP4206_Type 			= 1
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  3. cowie

    cowie Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    12,801
    Likes Received:
    3
    GPU:
    GTX
    holy ....this thread kicks ass
     
  4. scorpscarx

    scorpscarx Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    1
    Good information, I really like how you can control the vrm chip to change to fixed or offset voltage on the CHL 8318 strix.

    Just a quick, slightly dumb question, controlling the voltage with the afterburner slider is ONLY changing the core voltage right, it's not upping the the memory and pcie voltages as well?
     

  5. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,952
    Likes Received:
    40
    There are independent sliders for core, memory and auxiliary voltages available in MSI Afterburner GUI if database enrty for a card configure VDDC, MVDDC and PEXVDD/VDDCI controllers. Core voltage slider is never upping anything but a core voltage on any card.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  6. scorpscarx

    scorpscarx Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    1
    Thank you for confirming, and If I read your documentation on the controller right, only the core can be controlled on 8318, adding in MVDDC and PEXVDD won't work. I had asked because I was getting memory artifacting earlier and my first thought was that it was generically adding mem voltage as well, but it was just instable.
     
  7. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    Here is my i2c dump, is there any supported voltage controller in it?
    Code:
    Scanning GPU VEN_1002&DEV_6811&SUBSYS_226C1458&REV_00&BUS_1&DEV_0&FN_0...
    Scanning I2C bus 0...
    Probing device 00...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 01...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 02...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 03...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 04...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 05...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 06...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 07...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 08...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 09...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 10...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 11...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 12...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 13...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 14...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 15...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 16...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 17...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 18...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 19...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 20...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 21...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 22...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 23...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 24...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 25...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 26...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 27...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 28...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 29...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 30...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 31...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 32...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 33...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 34...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 35...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 36...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 37...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 38...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 39...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 40...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 41...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 42...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 43...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 44...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 45...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 46...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 47...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 48...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 49...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4f...
    Invalid device
    Scanning I2C bus 1...
    Probing device 00...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 01...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 02...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 03...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 04...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 05...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 06...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 07...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 08...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 09...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 10...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 11...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 12...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 13...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 14...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 15...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 16...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 17...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 18...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 19...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 20...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 21...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 22...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 23...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 24...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 25...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 26...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 27...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 28...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 29...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 30...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 31...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 32...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 33...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 34...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 35...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 36...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 37...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 38...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 39...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 40...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 41...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 42...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 43...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 44...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 45...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 46...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 47...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 48...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 49...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4f...
    Invalid device
    Scanning I2C bus 2...
    Probing device 00...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 01...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 02...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 03...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 04...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 05...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 06...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 07...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 08...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 09...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 0f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 10...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 11...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 12...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 13...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 14...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 15...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 16...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 17...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 18...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 19...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 1f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 20...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 21...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 22...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 23...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 24...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 25...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 26...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 27...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 28...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 29...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 2f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 30...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 31...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 32...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 33...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 34...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 35...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 36...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 37...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 38...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 39...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 3f...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 40...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 41...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 42...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 43...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 44...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 45...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 46...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 47...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 48...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 49...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4a...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4b...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4c...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4d...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4e...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 4f...
    Invalid device
    Scanning I2C bus 3...
    Probing device 00...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 01...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 02...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 03...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 04...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 05...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 06...
    Invalid device
    Probing device 07...
    Invalid device
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    29 15 19 00 0E 1A 84 64 41 7D 11 66 66 20 FF FF 
    A2 22 B0 10 2B FF FF A4 80 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
    00 00 96 C0 19 18 FF 80 00 E3 1E 2B 84 63 1E 30 
    86 2A A4 1B 72 88 05 1C A4 E0 00 00 00 FF 00 00 
    A8 90 38 6C 60 3F 00 00 14 14 80 40 00 A0 A0 FF 
    FF 00 22 78 56 DD 89 3F 52 52 42 00 6F 03 00 4B 
    60 61 F4 01 05 0A 00 97 42 00 00 00 00 FF 06 FF 
    FF 20 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 15 15 00 00 
    00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 88 88 01 C2 20 00 0C 1F 
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    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 CF 00 00 68 6D 31 16 00 00 
    00 00 00 77 C0 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 01 20 00 00 
    00 00 AD 50 0C 00 10 00 3F 00 00 00 23 C0 F0 00 
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    00 00 00 10 20 33 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
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  8. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,952
    Likes Received:
    40
    Guys, if you ignore guide in the very first post, then at least specify exact model of your graphics card please. Naked I2C dump makes it harder to detect voltage controller model.

    The card in this dump seem to be Gigabyte R9 270X OC. According to reviews it uses IR3567A to control voltage and suspected chip is indeed located on bus 6 device 30h. MSI Afterburner supports IR3567B. They can be register compatible, however I cannot say for sure because I have no IR3567A specs. If I treat it as IR3567B, then quick looks on diagnostic registers of this device in your dump is telling me that the voltage loop 1 output is 0.867mV and voltage loop 2 output is 1.625mV, which seem to match expected idle VDDC and MVDDC perfectly.
    So you may try to force AB to detect it as IR3567B, but at your own risk only. To do it add create the following third party database. And once again, at your own risk only, as I'm not sure that IR3567A and IR3567B are compatible from programming POV. If you decide to try it, start with monitoring part, enable core voltage graph and ensure that it is reporting some trustworthy voltages in idle and under load. And if it is OK - proceed with attempt to boost voltage a bit.

    Code:
    ;OEM
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6811&SUBSYS_226C1458&REV_??]
    
    ; Gigabyte R9 270X OC
    
    Desc					= Gigabyte R9 270X OC
    VDDC_IR3567B_Detection			= 6:30h
    VDDC_IR3567B_Output			= 0
    
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  9. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    In your case with single CHL8318 installed - yes. But on a different abstract card vendor can install two CHL8318 on different I2C addresses to control two independent voltages. Or even control core voltage via some different controller and use secondary CHL8318 to control memory voltage for example. But in reality CHL8318 is powerful 8-phase and rather expensive controller, so it doesn't make too much sense to install as a helper for controlling secondary voltages.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  10. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    Sorry, I read it but didn't understand what I needed to do and saw in the prev thread people just posted their dumps.

    The card is a GIGABYTE GV-R927OC-2GD Radeon R9 270 2GB

    I'll try monitoring and see if it works.

    Thanks!

     

  11. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    Looks like the voltage monitoring is working, and have the slider for adjusting, but haven't tested that yet.
     
  12. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Nice.
     
  13. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    40
    I've received settings for Sapphire Radeon Dual-X R9 280X from my friends in a different forum. Can anyone with Sapphire Radeon Dual-X R9 280X confirm that it is working?

    Code:
    ;OEM
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6798&SUBSYS_3001174B&REV_??]
    
    ; Sapphire Radeon Dual-X R9 280X
    
    Desc 					= Sapphire Dual-X R9 280X
    VDDC_NCP4206_Detection 			= 20h
    VDDC_NCP4206_Type 			= 1
    
     
  14. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    Not sure if this is an issue or not, but afterburner is reporting different voltage than other software like hwinfo and gpuz at stock voltages it is about .08v off

    But I am able to hit 1200core and 1500ram now an staying at 60c
     
  15. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Youre' confusing confuse driver readings vs VRM output reading.
     

  16. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    Ok, so afterburner is reporting the VRM output and the others are recording driver readings?

    Also, what I have achieved so far: http://imgur.com/a/Nx5PJ

     
  17. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Seem to be working fine according to screenshot. BTW, IR3567B is dual-loop controller, which is controlling 2 voltages. So after getting the first one working, we can unlock the second slider. Change DB to the following and it will unlock Aux voltage slider and Aux voltage graph. Should be around 1.6V by default.

    Code:
    ;OEM
    
    [VEN_1002&DEV_6811&SUBSYS_226C1458&REV_??]
    
    ; Gigabyte R9 270X OC
    
    Desc					= Gigabyte R9 270X OC
    VDDC_IR3567B_Detection			= 6:30h
    VDDC_IR3567B_Output			= 0
    VDDCI_IR3567B_Detection			= 6:30h
    VDDCI_IR3567B_Output			= 1
    
     
  18. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
  19. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
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    40
    Either VDDCI or MVDDC.
     
  20. ludespeedny

    ludespeedny Member

    Messages:
    11
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    0
    GPU:
    R9 270
    are both of those memory voltage?
     

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