The NSA Reportedly Has Total Access To The Apple iPhone

Discussion in 'The Guru's Pub' started by volors, Dec 31, 2013.

  1. volors

    volors Member Guru

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    The NSA Reportedly Has Total Access To The Apple iPhone

    JEEP

    As with most good stories, revelations of the NSA spy program will almost certainly keep getting worse before anything gets better.

    Yesterday we reported on claims—based on leaked NSA documents—that the spy agency was rerouting laptops ordered online to install spyware and malicious hardware on the machines.

    Laptops are just one device the agency is targeting, however.

    Der Spiegel reported on the NSA’s access to smartphones and, in particular, the iPhone back in September. Today, these reports expand to the NSA’s apparent ability to access just about all your iPhone data through a program called DROPOUTJEEP, according to security researcher Jacob Applebaum.

    During a speech at the 30th Chaos Communication Congress in Germany, Applebaum revealed some startling information about the program.

    From the NSA document in question:

    ““DROPOUT JEEP is a software implant for the Apple iPhone that utilizes modular mission applications to provide specific SIGINT functionality. This functionality includes the ability to remotely push/pull files from the device. SMS retrieval, contact list retrieval, voicemail, geolocation, hot mic, camera capture, cell tower location, etc. Command, control and data exfiltration can occur over SMS messaging or a GPRS data connection. All communications with the implant will be covert and encrypted.”


    S3222_DROPOUTJEEP

    The NSA apparently claims a 100% success rate in installing the malware on iPhones.

    Report: NSA Intercepting Laptops Ordered Online, Installing Spyware

    Erik KainErik Kain
    Contributor

    While many tech companies have spoken out publicly against the PRISM program since it was revealed earlier this year, Applebaum sounds a cautionary note on corporate involvement.

    “Do you think Apple helped them build that?” Appelbaum asks at one point in his talk. “I don’t know. I hope Apple will clarify that… Here’s a problem: I don’t really believe that Apple didn’t help them. I can’t really prove it, but they [the NSA] literally claim that anytime they target an iOS device, that it will succeed for implantation. Either they have a huge collection of exploits that work against Apple products, meaning that they are hoarding information about critical systems that American companies produce and sabotaging them, or Apple sabotaged it themselves. Not sure which one it is. I’d like to believe that since Apple didn’t join the PRISM program until after Steve Jobs died, that maybe it’s just that they write ****ty software.”

    Of course, Apple is hardly the only smartphone maker targeted by the NSA. According to Der Spiegel, Android and even Blackberry have been cracked by the agency, though perhaps not so thoroughly.

    Taken as a whole, each of these revelations and reports paint a grim portrait of government overreach.

    Since the Patriot Act was first made into law, and during the intervening years between then and revelations of the NSA PRISM program, one question has been paramount for privacy advocates: How do we, as a society, balance the need for security against the rights to privacy and freedom? At what point does the cost to our freedom begin to outweigh the perceived benefit of an ever more encroaching security apparatus?

    That’s two questions, I suppose, but they’re part and parcel. So far, the elected officials we’ve placed in power have been unwilling to answer them, and the only reason we have any glimpse into these programs at all is thanks to whistleblowers like Edward Snowden. The only other question that remains is this: Will the American public ever make this a big enough issue to determine the outcome of elections?

    Because until that happens, I sincerely doubt we’ll see a change in policy. I’ll sound off on a dour note. Economic and culture-war politics will almost certainly remain at the top of most voters’ priorities lists. While this story makes a splash, it will be a long time before it influences the ballot in any significant way. NSA privacy violations make a big, short-lived splash in the news and then fade in favor of bread and butter issues like jobs.

    Which is understandable, but problematic.

    It’s important to also note that these are claims and reports that offer just a glimpse at the full picture. We are dealing with a great deal of murkiness in that regard, so take everything with a grain of salt and the knowledge that, for better or worse, there is much more to this story.
     
  2. Clouseau

    Clouseau Ancient Guru

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    The article that surfaced that all this recent hoopla is based on was from January of 2007. If the NSA went ahead with this, it has been in place for years.
     
  3. nhlkoho

    nhlkoho Ancient Guru

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    I believe it. Why do you think Apple continues to get away with the nonsense lawsuits they file?
     
  4. Neo Cyrus

    Neo Cyrus Ancient Guru

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    Let's be honest here, we all knew from the beginning that they're working together.
     

  5. volors

    volors Member Guru

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    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/10545720/Apple-denies-backdoor-NSA-access.html



    Apple denies 'backdoor' NSA access

    Apple says it has no 'backdoor' in its products after a security researcher and a leaked document suggested the US National Security Agency had unfettered access to the iPhone.

    Apple said in an email to AFP that it "has never worked with the NSA to create a backdoor in any of our products, including iPhone."


    The statement added that " we have been unaware of this alleged NSA program targeting our products."


    Security researcher Jacob Applebaum described the NSA program based on a purportedly leaked document about NSA access to the iPhone, in comments made in Germany.


    Apple said it "is continuously working to make our products even more secure, and we make it easy for customers to keep their software up to date with the latest advancements... and will continue to use our resources to stay ahead of malicious hackers and defend our customers from security attacks, regardless of who's behind them."


    Applebaum told a security conference in Germany that the program called DROPOUTJEEP allowed the NSA to intercept SMS messages, access contact lists, locate a phone using cell tower data, access voice mail or activate an iPhone's microphone and camera.
    He described it as "an iPhone backdoor" that allowed the NSA to access any iPhone.

    The documents were also described in the German newspaper Der Spiegel.

    Security researcher Graham Cluley said in a blog post that Applebaum's presentation and the documents show a "broader range of tools that the NSA apparently deploys against other technology companies and products, including HP (Hewlett-Packard) servers, Cisco firewalls, Huawei routers, and so on."

    But Cluley said the document "does not mean that the NSA has complete control of your iPhone" because physical access to the device would be needed.

    "It may be that they have since found unpatched vulnerabilities in iOS to install the spyware onto targeted devices remotely... but that's not what the leaked documents say," Cluley said.

    Cluley also noted that the document dates from 2008.

    "Let's hope that Apple has improved its software's security since 2008. And if it's not true, we've all got a huge problem," he said.
     
  6. Clouseau

    Clouseau Ancient Guru

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    The document itself carries an October 2008 date but the source from which that document was derrived:

    Derrived from: NSA/CSSM 1-52
    Dated: 20070108
    Delcassify on: 20320108
     
  7. Corrupt^

    Corrupt^ Ancient Guru

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    Good thing I format laptops I buy for myself and my family with a clean OS disk these days. To many bloatware anyways...

    Unless the backdoor is incorperated into the drivers of the hardware, then there's no real easy way around it.
     
  8. V@IO

    V@IO Master Guru

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    Damn, guess I'll have to get rid of my iPhone then.
     
  9. Leafblower

    Leafblower Ancient Guru

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    Always assume everything has a backdoor.
     
  10. Brasky

    Brasky Ancient Guru

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    they all do, but only the kinky ones are into it...:banana:
     

  11. TekkMarine

    TekkMarine Maha Guru

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    This.
     
  12. Xendance

    Xendance Ancient Guru

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    Unless you can inspect and compile the source code. And then you just have to hope that the compiler doesn't inject a back door :p
     

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