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Superfetch.....

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by Killian38, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. Killian38

    Killian38 Master Guru

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    I'm upgrading all my old PC's in my home to SSD's. 3 PC's are getting SSD's. In the past I have heard superfetch may harm SSDs. My research tells me Superfetch does not write or erase data from the drive. If that is the case I should be ok? I know of a few other services I may want to disable but from what i'm reading superfetch isn't one of them? I'm not sure. The folks on this forum are hands down the best to ask.

    OS on all the machines is Windows 10 latest updates.
     
  2. Undying

    Undying Ancient Guru

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    Dont overthink this. Its just indexing service.

    Improving longevity of the drive and the performance difference will be unnoticeable.
     
  3. LocoDiceGR

    LocoDiceGR Ancient Guru

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  4. lucidus

    lucidus Ancient Guru

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    I'm reasonably sure superfetch is auto disabled for SSD's. TBH I'd just ignore those guides at this point unless you're using a very tiny SSD.
     

  5. WareTernal

    WareTernal Master Guru

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    Intel recommends Superfetch ON for Windows 8-10.
    'In Microsoft Windows Vista* and Windows 7*, Superfetch* tracks and copies your most frequently used applications to system memory to reduce load times. Superfetch is based on the similar Prefetch feature available in Windows XP. Superfetch/Prefetch is not needed on an Intel SSD under Windows 7 or Windows Vista, and should be disabled for optimal performance.

    In Microsoft Windows 8*, Superfetch functions differently than in previous versions of Windows, and should not be disabled for an Intel SSD
    .'
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  6. Astyanax

    Astyanax Ancient Guru

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    All testing has proven otherwise, microsoft disables it because early ssd's had limited writes and no trim capability.

    Recent SSD's are fine and superfetch improves performance as RAM is still faster than disk access.
     
  7. EdKiefer

    EdKiefer Ancient Guru

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    Win10 has superfetch service on but it deleted the reg key. "Enable SuperFetch"
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\
    Session Manager\Memory Management\PrefetchParameters
    "Enable Prefetch" =3
    "Enable SuperFetch" =3

    So you can try 3 for on and 0 or remove for off.
    For more detail info of settings 0, 1, 2, 3
    https://www.thewindowsclub.com/disable-superfetch-prefetch-ssd

    PS superfetch service was renamed to Sysmain in later builds
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  8. JonasBeckman

    JonasBeckman Ancient Guru

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    Only real advantage from testing it for a few months has been that the OS gets ready a little bit faster after a boot cycle as it doesn't jump into fetching the commonly run software but in turn these programs then get cached into RAM now for Windows 10 (Albeit not always perfectly depending on how the OS unloads said cache but it can be forced though it will then immediately begin caching again requiring a few minutes if it's a regular HDD.) although for super-fetch I could not find too big of a difference between boot and programs (Or 3 which is boot + programs.) and it all kinda worked the same, probably due to said caching mechanic now loading programs into RAM as well as it can.

    SSD and DDR4 probably helps with speed too allowing for faster more efficient caching and then once in RAM it loads said data faster too though depending on program I guess it varies how well this helps.
    Trim and newer firmware and other SSD improvements probably have no issues with lifetime either including the newer tri-cell layers (TLC) and beyond still giving better robustness and overall lifetime over a standard HDD short of being completely powered off for a longer period of time which from what I'm hearing is still a bit sensitive to data loss or damage.

    I'd leave it at default, all in all it's a performance increase and on newer hardware the data speed should be fast enough to be less of a bottleneck on other running programs (The OS will try to pause for anything currently running though until that's done.) and it'll also take less time to fetch and cache said data. :)


    EDIT: It's a interesting topic though but there's a lot of old info on prefetching (XP) the newer superfetch (Vista) and then the recent way Windows 10 now caches to RAM too.
    (Which well unused RAM is not put to best use so it's a good feature to have.)

    Still not too sure on it all myself but from my own testing it's doing a good job even if the initial boot time can be a bit slower until it's done and everything is snappy and fast again but I'd imagine a SSD resolves that and then TRIM and the other improvements still gives well over a decade of life-time for the hardware itself and the cells and other parts and components would fail before those are "spent" even if it's a very active drive with a lot of data being written or read. :)
     
  9. EdKiefer

    EdKiefer Ancient Guru

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    Yes, with SSD I would tend to think to leave it at default settings but on a say SSD boot and HDD data, it might pay to have it on.
    I just enabled it for applications to see if I notice anything as I just installed BFV on my HDD instead of boot OS SSD as I thought it might get close to being filled too much.
     
  10. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    I don`t get why people say about SSD lifespan in context of superfetch. Sure it creates database on disk, but it is very small and it is updated not that frequently.
     

  11. JonasBeckman

    JonasBeckman Ancient Guru

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    Perceived notion of just how many reads or writes or total data that can be written I suppose. Although with the cache function now used in the later builds of Windows 10 say you have 16 GB RAM then you would be sending 10 - 12 GB of data from the drive to the ram as that gets loaded but ultimately that's still not that much. :)
    (And if you don't switch over to another RAM heavy program it would be retained once cached instead of unloaded to make room for other data getting cached.)

    Smaller programs and such aren't going to use much though, it's mostly heavier software or gaming and for gaming well if you were to monitor some modern games and you can see just how much data it actually is loading and unloading via streaming for example. It's not that bad even if were to be daily.


    EDIT: And then Windows 8 was it that made TRIM a standard function for SSD's with Windows and having support for that it's not going to wear out the drive anytime soon. Probably lasting longer than a HDD short of mechanical defects really.
    (No moving parts so no risk of wear and tear or issues such as head impacts or aging affecting the spindle and such things.)

    EDIT: Might have been Windows 7 or perhaps Win7 SP1 actually, it's been supported for some time now. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  12. EdKiefer

    EdKiefer Ancient Guru

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    I agree the folder is only holding MB worth (mine as of now is 5Mb), your web browser will write more than that in a days use.
     

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