Super High Resolutions: Diminishing returns ?

Discussion in 'Videocards - NVIDIA GeForce' started by Turdhat, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. Turdhat

    Turdhat Master Guru

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    Since getting a 1070 I have been experimenting with extreme levels of super sampling. For instance I might load up something light on the GPU like Sonic all Star Racing or something old and set it to 4k. Using Nspector I will apply super sampling or the like as high as I can set it and keep 60fps.

    It does look even more crisp somehow even though there are no addition pixels and all types of aliasing eliminated. Will resolution make AA obsolete in the next few years ?

    Edit: That nice feeling when you need to update the hardware in your sig.:banana:
     
  2. Assnfiks

    Assnfiks New Member

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    Yup, with 5k + dsr smoothness 33% you need no AA at all. Just gotta wait for gpus that can maintain a minimum of 60 fps on 5k.
     
  3. Bloodred217

    Bloodred217 Master Guru

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    High DPI is the "natural" solution to aliasing, once high DPI displays are standard for PCs like they are for mobile devices I expect AA will be much less useful. I can personally attest that 3840x2160 at 27" is much sharper and suffers from much less aliasing than 2560x1440 at the same screen size. 4K with no AA at all pretty much always looks better than 1440p with any sort of AA applied. As for actual aliasing, in some games AA is legitimately useless, while in others some sort of post-process AA like SMAA can provide a slight IQ improvement.
     
  4. Thalyn

    Thalyn Member Guru

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    Aliasing occurs when you can see the offset between pixels. As soon as those variations become small enough to be "invisible" (they're obviously still there - just at normal viewing distances you can't see them) you've effectively eliminated aliasing. At that point, anything aiming to remove aliasing becomes superfluous.

    This is why Apple made their Retina line of devices. They're supposed to have a fine enough resolution that you simply cannot make out individual pixels, thus visible aliasing won't ever occur in normal usage situations.

    Of course, the exact resolution required for this will vary for the individual, based on their viewing arrangement, screen size and eyes. Mathematically, my less-than-perfect vision (even with corrective lenses) should only require a 27" 1600p widescreen at 2½' viewing distance before I can no longer perceive aliasing; though it's generally accepted that the centre 5° of vision is significantly more sensitive so I may still want some PPAA.
     

  5. 0blivious

    0blivious Ancient Guru

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    I have a 43" 4k TV as my second monitor. AA is indeed less necessary at super high resolutions. With high enough resolution on a small enough monitor, AA won't really be needed at all.
     

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