Some questions about OCing Q6700

Discussion in 'Die-hard Overclocking & Case Modifications' started by Ov3rbyte, May 7, 2011.

  1. Ov3rbyte

    Ov3rbyte Member

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    GPU:
    GB GTX 560 Ti - 1010/2020
    I've read this link about how to OC on my motherboard. But I have a few questions, mostly if I have anything that is limiting me to only 3.0GHz (9x333) which is the only stable speed i can get.

    Here's my exact specs
    Intel Q6700 @ 3.0GHz (9x333Mhz)
    GTX 560 Ti - 1000/2000
    CORSAIR XMS2 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model TWIN2X4096-6400C5
    CoolerMaster 750W
    Antec 900 Case
    Zalman
    CNPS7500-Cu LED Universal CPU Cooler

    Any time I set my multiplier to 10x320 (3.2GHz) it messes up and won't post at all. Not sure if I'm doing something wrong but I've done the following
    • Turned off Smart Fan control
    • Turned off CPU EIST Function (Speedstep)
    • Disabled CPU Enhanced Halt
    • Locked my PCIe bus at 100Mhz
    • Set my memory multiplier to 2.00
    • Turned off all "performance enhancers" off of turbo/etc to standard
    • Messed with voltages but not FSB voltages

    Anyone know what my problem could be? My goal is really 3.4 or 3.6ghz if possible but I'm not sure if that's possible with the stability that I'm having. I'm going to try to set my FSB over-voltages to +.2 or +.3 or so to see if that does the trick. Any thoughts on what I should try setting my Vcore to? I've tried default and it won't boot past windows or wont post at all sometimes.
     
  2. TheHunter

    TheHunter Banned

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    GPU:
    MSi N570GTX TFIII [OC|PE]
    did you try Mch + 0.200v; fsb +0.100v (or even +0.200v)


    and maybe its your advanced mem timings set to tight or static tRead (performance level) to low..
     
  3. shimyns

    shimyns Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    SAPPHIRE r9 290x Tri-X OC
    Like TheHunter said concerning memory, but also make sure you set the SPD so your memory speed is way lower than the stock speed for your RAM.
    If it is set much lower, you can surely rule out the chance that it is your memory that is failing.

    I had a p35-ds3l and I OCed my old E6700 with it to 420x8 --> 3.36 Ghz. What you have to do is decide which multiplier you want to use and then start raising your FSB speed (taking into mind what your final goal speed is.).

    Besides your FSB voltage you definately want to pay attention to your MCH voltage which is the Northbridge voltage. When using a higher FSB clock, you're gonna want to add some juice to your MCH.

    There is a good and very logical way to step by step reach your goal:

    1. Lower SPD. Lower CPU multiplier. Start raising your FSB clock (and stress-test with prime95 for 5 min after each increment). Add only FSB voltage and MCH voltage until reaching stability at your goal FSB clock. Because of your low CPU multiplier, you know that your CPU is far from reaching its limit and therefore vcore should not be raised at this point. At the end of the step, try a longer stress-test before continuing.

    2. Keep low SPD. Lower your FSB clock back down. Keep the voltage settings for FSB and MCH from setp (1). Set your CPU mutiplier to the predecided goal multiplier. Now start raising your FSB like before until reaching your final goal CPU speed (test every increment for 5 min like before. This time, you should only need to add vcore, as you have taken care of your MCH and FSB voltages during the previous step and can logically raise your FSB clock to what you reached in step (1) without needing to add any FSB or MCH voltage. At the end of the step, try a longer stress-test before continuing.

    3. Keep MCH, FSB, and vcore voltage from steps (1) and (2). Lower FSB again. Set SPD to goal SPD. Set DRAM voltage to specified voltage for your RAM. Start raising FSB again while stress-testing between increments until you reach your goal FSB clock (from previous steps) and also your desired memory speed. Add DRAM voltage if you need to (that's the point of this step).


    The whole logic here is to isolate the components in order to know which one needs juice. Step 1: mobo. Step 2: CPU. Step 3: RAM.



    Good luck.
     
  4. gampamu

    gampamu Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    MSI 8800GTS 320
    ^+1. Sectionalizing is the very best approach to overclocking.

    If you have the system stable at 333x9, 320x10 should be pretty easy. You just need to give the cpu the vcore it needs. How much depends on your chip. Start experimenting with VID+.05 and go up or down as needed. Good luck.
     

  5. Ov3rbyte

    Ov3rbyte Member

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    GPU:
    GB GTX 560 Ti - 1010/2020
    This is where I seem to be having the most problem (besides understanding what anyone is talking about ram, I'm pretty sure ram confuses me atm)

    I try raising my vcore to like 1.375 or so and in CPUid it only shows it at 1.28 or so. Any reason why? I have most of my settings changed for it not to adjust my voltages back to safe settings or anything.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2011
  6. Ov3rbyte

    Ov3rbyte Member

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    GPU:
    GB GTX 560 Ti - 1010/2020
    Ok I flashed my BIOS to F6 and it seems to be saving the voltages that I'm changing now. Wouldn't work in F4. Letting me into windows to finally do some prime95 tests now. Runnin 9x378(3.4ghz) idle at 34c. :D Doing load tests soon.
     

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