So I been running my 10850K at 5200Mhz for weeks,Am I going to degrade CPU

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by bobnewels, Jan 1, 2021.

  1. bobnewels

    bobnewels Member Guru

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    So I been running my 10850K at 5200Mhz for weeks,Am I going to degrade CPU .I have run at 5400Mhz but I was afraid it was too high .

    What if I lost 20 points in Cinebench after a year I would be devastated. Anyway 4800Mhz gives the same FPS as 5200Mhz and 5400Mhz what would you run at .I like the big numbers though.

    OMG I can not even stomach I wrote that LOL.I see these stupid things about AMD CPUs all the time.


    5200 10850K.jpg
     
  2. Kevin Mauro

    Kevin Mauro Member Guru

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    I don't believe it works like that but okay...
     
  3. bobnewels

    bobnewels Member Guru

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    OMG how does it work then,I am interested in your opinion.
     
  4. INSTG8R

    INSTG8R Ancient Guru

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    Well I mean I’m sure eventually. The question is why would when it’s just unnecessary be it Intel or AMD there’s just no reason to. We’re not running P4s anymore that just have a single speed...
     

  5. bobnewels

    bobnewels Member Guru

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  6. CPC_RedDawn

    CPC_RedDawn Ancient Guru

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    You are answering your own question.

    You said you are worried about degrading your CPU at 5.2-5.4GHz

    But it performs the same at 4.8GHz and by the looks of your video runs 10C cooler.....

    Run it at 4.8GHz then, that way you still get the same fps and it will last longer. Just make a profile in the BIOS for 5.2 and 5.4GHz and just use them for benchmarking those high numbers ;) and make a profile for 4.8GHz and use that on a day to day basis for general use such as gaming.
     
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  7. Zooke

    Zooke Master Guru

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    After a year, new faster cpu's will be available making your scores very second rate.
    Imagine how you would feel then.
     
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  8. chinobino

    chinobino Maha Guru

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    Yes, better buy a spare so you're prepared for when it can only hit 5.1 GHz
     
  9. bobnewels

    bobnewels Member Guru

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    Ok smart guy second time I asked you,how does it work I am interested in your opinion
     
  10. DannyD

    DannyD Maha Guru

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    It's not voltage that kills a cpu it's heat, sustained high temps aren't good for cpu health.
     

  11. Astyanax

    Astyanax Ancient Guru

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    its voltage and heat.
     
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  12. emperorsfist

    emperorsfist Maha Guru

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    Higher voltage will also degrade the CPU. High heat as well, ofc, but you make it sound as if voltage has no effect whatsoever.
     
  13. Kevin Mauro

    Kevin Mauro Member Guru

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    I only see an alert when it does the quote thing ".... "


    At stock, everything has been tested and "rated" in a highly controlled environment that goes through a very long and lengthy QA process. Now my knowledge is limited to an extent but from what I understand you develop baselines, standards, and other means of "definition" via units of measurement among other things that aid in defining a given component be it a CPU, etc during development, QA, process, production workflows. This much I've gleaned from what I do, where I work, and the people that I work with. This aids us to give a stable, consistent product at the end of a given cycle - use whichever one for your use-case. To complement that, we have teams that test motherboards, memory, and other supplementary hardware in conjunction with brand partners and the other main OEMs to ensure a variety of things - too many to name here in fact but among them QA.

    Where this is going is when you overclock, you throw all of the above out the window. I'm not saying there is no methodology or "science" to "manual overclocks" but when you perform them anything we test for in the lab environment is not "technically" applicable nor accounted for as you are "exceeding" the constraints of those conditions if that makes sense? What that means is, no one can tell you what Cinebench will essentially "do" in how many years (or at all for that matter but that's another topic) and if Cinebench were to provide lower marks it wouldn't be to say it was your CPU degrading, that's presumptive. It is commonplace that your motherboard or CPU (or both) would need more power to maintain previously established "clocks" after some time depending on how "in-efficient" your OC is or the structural quality of that particular unit you received. Still, CPU deterioration is rare and generally takes several years. Theoretically overclocking would accelerate the process and I can't estimate how much. For example, some people run overclocks full speed 24/7 which is like a "compounded-stressor".

    Generally, good thermals are one of the best courses of action to counteract what people might refer to as "silicon deterioration". Still, don't assume low temps are the only/primary counter-measure. If you can find a stable OC that *uses firmware/OS power-saving features I recommend it, my two cents is, balance energy efficiency settings/features with your overclocking (it will add more time and finesse). Some people do not care about the lifecycle of their product though, they feel they'll be replacing it within the next 2 or 3 years anyway - if that's you I reiterate I feel it is still a gamble to push a 24/7 max OC but yes many do it all the time, I don't know that's the best reasoning for smart decision making in life though...but that's just me. Either way - regarding the benchmarking software question, Cinebench won't just "give out lower scores over time" it will report the same provided your machine can continue to boot & operate at the same clocks over that same period of time assuming it (its components & that previously established OC) remain stable. If you're like "Well how do I know that?" The general answer I'd give is a known-good "stress test" (like AIDA) if you have reason to suspect a problem.

    *There's good information here Intel has made available for the general public: White Papers (intel.com)
    *I'm not a representative of my workplace(s). My views are my own & are expressed as personal viewpoints and not related nor pertaining to any aspect of representing my company or clients as an official spokesperson(s).
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
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  14. jura11

    jura11 Ancient Guru

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    As guys above said there, what kills or degrade your CPU is combination of voltage and temperatures, personally I keep my temperatures on CPU below 80°C on Intel or AMD

    My old 5960x once stopped recognising one side of the RAM, most likely Asus Rampage V Extreme on Auto pumped excessive voltage to SA, after that I always set everything manually, every voltage

    Due this I recommend set all voltages manually and for OC, keep voltage and temperatures always in sight or have opened in background HWiNFO or something like that

    Hope this helps and good luck there

    Thanks, Jura
     
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  15. jura11

    jura11 Ancient Guru

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    I would add I wouldn't go beyond 1.4v on newer Intel CPU if I run them as daily, for benchmarks off course I run high or higher voltage like 1.45v but not as dail

    On my old 5960x I run max 4.7GHz with 1.35v and at that voltage I already been scared hahaha, built for friend 10900k loop and there he is running I think 1.35v for 5.2GHz,5.3GHz literally needs like 1.39v and 5.4GHz needs 1.45v
    Hope this helps

    Thanks, Jura
     
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  16. bobnewels

    bobnewels Member Guru

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    LOL I can not believe people can not read or understand what what said. AWESOME thanks for the lol.
     
  17. rflair

    rflair Don Commisso Staff Member

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    I got it from the start, a troll post to amuse yourself.
     
  18. Valken

    Valken Ancient Guru

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    @bobnewels I wanted to ask how is the heat output? Was it good enough so you can turn off the heater if it is cold in your area?

    Was 6 C this morning so had a thought about your post. Could really use it to warm our feet while gaming. LOL!
     
  19. chinobino

    chinobino Maha Guru

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    The only way to get those 20 cinebench points back is replace the CPU. Sorry for your loss.
     
  20. Kevin Mauro

    Kevin Mauro Member Guru

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    Alright, kid.

    You got more information than you deserved you condescending nincompoop. Take it easy, no need to be like "no one understands me" just be cool about it. I think we're all nice here; there is a contrast between joking and being obnoxious.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021

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