RX Vega Owners Thread, Tests, Mods, BIOS & Tweaks !

Discussion in 'Videocards - AMD Radeon' started by OnnA, Aug 15, 2017.

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  1. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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  2. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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  3. sneida

    sneida Member

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    upgraded from a r9 290 to a sapphire rx vega 64 liquid.
    [​IMG]

    quite happy so far, what a beauty - and its way faster than the 290.;)

    time spy, stock clock rates, balanced profile: 7518
    [​IMG]

    timespy, stock clock rates, custom profile (power +50%): 7767
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2017
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  4. NvidiaFreak650

    NvidiaFreak650 Master Guru

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    @ Sneida
    Wow, sexy card, too bad they didn't had none where I got RX Vega 64, even the reference model look sexy.

    Also DOOM with OpenGL 4.5 at Ultra/Nightmare settings @ 21:9 (2560x1080@75hz) with Freesync on runs DOOM perfect lock 75fps. I don't even need to use Vulkan that how good RX Vega 64 is with OpenGL 4.5.
     

  5. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    :) ... Vulcan is better iMO
     
  6. sneida

    sneida Member

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    crimson 17.8.1 (final), core 1752mhz (stock) / 1100mv (undervolted from 1200mv), memory 1000mhz (overclocked from 945) stock voltage 950mv, power limit +50%:

    firestrike score (grahics score): 23541

    [​IMG]

    crimson 17.8.1 (final), ALL stock with power limit +50%

    firestrike score (grahics score): 23703

    [​IMG]

    kind of strange.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  7. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    ^^ No, it's not, run tests 2x always.
    Last one is tricky, sometimes i have 30FPS average and sometimes 28FPS and then you will have lower score/FPS -> IMO perfect underVolted score.

    Now run 3Dmark with FPS Cap 61 and Balanced profile + undervolt and tell us the difference.
    check with HWinfo64

    I bet we will see ~200tW not 300tW ;)
     
  8. sneida

    sneida Member

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    updated benchmarks:

    crimson 17.8.1 (final), core 1752mhz (stock) / 1100mv (undervolted from 1200mv), memory 1000mhz (overclocked from 945) stock voltage 950mv, power limit +50%:
    firestrike score (grahics score): 23541

    crimson 17.8.1 (final), core 1667mhz (lowered from 1752) / 1050mv (undervolted from 1200mv), memory 1050mhz (overclocked from 945) stock voltage 950mv, default power limit (+/- 0):
    firestrike score (graphics score): 23991

    crimson 17.8.1 (final), core 1667mhz (lowered from 1752) / 1050mv (undervolted from 1200mv), memory 1100mhz (overclocked from 945) stock voltage 950mv, default power limit (+/- 0):
    firestrike score (graphics score): 24348

    comparison:

    crimson 17.8.1 (final), ALL stock with power limit +50%
    firestrike score (grahics score): 23703

    saw it @ overclock.net forums - lower core mhz enables higher memory overclock -> combined with undervolting it seems to be faster and more efficient.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  9. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    Told you :D
    Explanation of these fenomenon:

    AMD & ATI uses now Infinity Fabric (it's also called Hyper Transport 5.0) to connect Int_Devices together.
    Faster the Fabric (memory) faster the Chip will get....
    THX to HBM we can go up with performance without uping the tW !

    That's why i will get myself a 3800 CL14 32GB soon :D for ZEN
    Now i have 16GB 2940MHz CL14 1T -> and it's fast...
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  10. sneida

    sneida Member

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    i'm currently running it like this (3466 CL15):

    [​IMG]
     

  11. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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  12. haste

    haste Maha Guru

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  13. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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  14. BAZOKA1942

    BAZOKA1942 Member Guru

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  15. Fox2232

    Fox2232 Ancient Guru

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    That's a lot of money for moving from one memory set to another. And you can expect much higher performance bump (in similar price) by buying Zen+ once it is out.
    + selling CPU is likely easier and at smaller loss than selling memory.
    I am still thinking about Ryzen 7 1700 + 4x 8GB 3600MHz. But knowing that AMD realizes main weaknesses of Zen since 1st ES, I expect Zen+ to deal with quite a few of them.
    So I wait, and wait, and wait, ... and wait.

    @sneida: Those clock comparisons are nice to see. They do confirm my expectations. If you are interested in knowing exactly where is your optimal point, make a grid (excel sheet).
    Horizontally memory clock changes by 50 MHz. Vertically GPU Clock changes by 50MHz.
    You can make same table few cells to side and record Wattage or any other values you are interested in and then you can do math on multi-dimensional matrices.
     

  16. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    Still Beta :D

    -> https://www.hardwareluxx.de/index.p...vega-56-und-vega-64-im-undervolting-test.html

    Assessment of Undervolting
    It is quite astonishing how much the gain by the undervoltings for the two cards fails. The Radeon RX Vega 64 and Vega 56 benefit greatly in terms of performance and savings in power requirements. It can be clearly seen that the Radeon RX Vega 64 is already quite close to the limit and there is little potential. In the Radeon RX Vega 56, on the other hand, we see a large scope, which should also be used by anyone who loves the building.

    The results for the Radeon RX Vega 64 are as follows: In terms of performance, the GeForce GTX 1080 Founders Edition is quite clear. We have no values for an undervolting of the competition cards here, but take these values only as reference points. It would be unfair to compare a low-voltage card with one in the delivery state. At the same time, the undervolting of the Radeon RX Vega 64 means a significant reduction in power consumption, even if it is still part of the current single-GPU cards.

    The Radeon RX Vega 56 is a little better. Here we see a significant reduction in the power requirement, which makes the GeForce GTX 1070 (again without undervolting) closer. The biggest jump, however, is at the same time as the performance, because despite a reduction in the voltage, we were able to significantly increase the cycle, or hold more stable at a high level. In the benchmarks, therefore, she moves the larger Radeon RX Vega 64 quite close to the Pelle and can also leave the GeForce GTX 1080 behind.

    Currently, however, an undervolting is still quite complicated, since the software can not be trusted. Indicators for the clock do not have to be correct and if the voltage has been accepted, is only ensured by a glance at the consumption. A simple setting of the values in the software is not enough at the moment - everything has to be validated.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Vega Bench, look at Min. FPS !
    Driver: 17.8.1WHQL Aug18 (new one)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2017
  17. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    -> https://techgage.com/article/a-look-at-amd-radeon-vega-hbcc

    A Quick Look At The High Bandwidth Cache Controller On AMD’s Radeon RX Vega

    After spending quite a number of hours testing AMD’s Radeon RX Vega in both gaming and compute workloads, I wondered if there was some other interesting angle I could take a look at the card from. Then I remembered a little feature called “HBCC”, a major addition to RX Vega that I ended up putting on the back burner until this weekend.

    At its Capsaicin & Cream event held alongside GDC in February, AMD made a big fuss about RX Vega’s HBCC (High-Bandwidth Cache Controller), promising huge benefits to gaming and professional performance in certain scenarios. At its RX Vega editor’s day a couple of weeks ago, Radeon chief Raja Koduri called it his favorite feature of the new architecture.

    “If it’s so amazing, why is it disabled by default in the driver?”, I asked myself. AMD has made it clear that this is a forward-thinking technology, one that will enable grand environments in our future games due to a huge boost in data transfer efficiency. But… I remembered seeing some sort of gaming benchmark in the past, and lo and behold, it was at that aforementioned Capsaicin & Cream event.

    [​IMG]
    During his presentation (YouTube), Raja touted the potential of seeing +50% gains to average framerates, and a staggering +100% boost to minimum framerates in our gaming. In the demo he gave, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided was run on a 4GB RX Vega, giving us a good use case of how HBCC could help with big games on more modest hardware.

    Of course, AMD doesn’t currently sell any 4GB RX Vega hardware, and I am not sure when we’ll see any considering the fact that HBM2 is expensive beyond the means of a midrange card. Despite all that, I felt compelled to see if I could find a single worthwhile test result from using HBCC, so, despite knowing I’d probably be testing in vain, I decided to trek on.

    But first, what is HBCC?

    In a nutshell, HBCC is, as its “high-bandwidth cache controller” name gives away, a complement to the framebuffer (or “high-bandwidth cache” as AMD now calls it) that will treat the VRAM as a last-level cache, and some system memory as VRAM. If a resource is requested by the GPU, but it’s not currently in video memory, the memory pages relating to the data will be pulled in to Vega’s HBC (framebuffer) for quicker access, while unused pages will be flushed out.

    In time, we could see application developers utilize this mechanic to maximize GPU efficiency in huge workloads. The pool of data that the Radeon Software will create is called the “HBCC Memory Segment” (HMS), and on our 32GB test PC, the minimum value that could be selected was ~11GB (max was ~24GB).

    [​IMG]
    HBCC is disabled by default, which is fine, as it isn’t needed (yet)
    In the future, this technology could enable us to enjoy massive worlds without having to spend thousands of dollars on increasing our video memory. That said, there are caveats with this kind of design, including an obvious one of adding latency to the data fetch. If the system RAM holds data that the GPU happens to need, it’ll have to flow on down through the PCIe bus before the GPU can snatch it up.


    [​IMG]
    HBCC is designed to be intelligent in how it manages the data, although at this point, it’s not entirely clear how data is handled today, or how it will be handled in the future. AMD talked at length about game developers who were in love with the idea of HBCC, so it could be that those same developers will have their own ideas on how to maximize the returns of HBCC.

    If it were possible to use a BIOS that disabled one of the HBM2 dies on RX Vega, this feature could probably be better tested. Currently, having a memory-starved card is going to be the only way you’ll notice a benefit from HBCC, and for many, memory is not going to be the limitation.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    AMD – RX Vega Launch Price “Ongoing”

    AMD is not changing its MSRP. However, RX Vega price inflation is occurring due to “huge” demand. As AMD’s Gerald Youngblood told PCGamesN:

    “Our SEPs, and the price tag that we announced, is our full intention of where we would suggest the product be priced. Not just for launch, but ongoing.

    What happened though was we launched the product and the demand was really huge. Now we’re focused on replenishing so that there is plenty of stock so we can encourage our partners to hit the SEPs that we announced.”

    High Demand

    In order to keep RX Vega prices down – and reduce them further – AMD needs to deliver adequate stock to retailers. Youngblood says:

    “First of all we just need to drive as much stock as we can, because inventory is really important in everybody being able to hit those prices. Then it’s just working with our partners to enable it, but we don’t set the price of their product. But we will drive, and do everything that we can, to get those prices to where we suggested when we launched them earlier.”

    https://www.eteknix.com/amd-denies-rx-vega-launch-price-discount
     
  19. OnnA

    OnnA Ancient Guru

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    Draw Stream binning rasterizer/Tiled Based Rendering

    Tiled Based Rendering
    Tiled based rendering started as a mobile rendering mostly. The first that had a Tiled based rendering was from PowerVR@1996. Nvidia managed to do a semi way of tiled based rendering with Maxwell.

    Draw Stream binning rasterizer
    Primitive shaders are a completely different thing though. There are 2 important stages that happen on the gpu in order to draw a pixel on the screen. The vertex shader that passes the vertex data from the mesh model to the shader and the fragment shader that passes the texture data to the uv data of the vertex. Primitive shaders combine all these steps including the tessellation/geometry stage with the advantage that can cull much faster the triangles that overdraw on the screen or the back of the triangle.

    That means that they can cull the triangles before they write them on the buffer. In general with this pipeline Vega has higher peak geometry performance than 1080ti.
     
  20. NvidiaFreak650

    NvidiaFreak650 Master Guru

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    RX Vega 64 is shutting down people PC's, i happen to me a few times already. the fix is to change the 8pin power supply cable with a new one or use a 8pin cable without 6+2pin. I change my cable & switch the bios on RX Vega card to the second one.
     
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