Radeon RX 460 with 1024 Stream processors spotted

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Jan 17, 2017.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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  2. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    :)

    sounds well, but teorically its up to 19% higher performance, 14% higher Core count @4% higher clock, but maybe 25% Higher pòwer compsumition :infinity:
     
  3. Srsbsns

    Srsbsns Member Guru

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    I dont know if I could afford the extra 14 cents a month to run this card!!!
     
  4. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    Lol

    Don't be troll, im not interested in RX460's i'll go for RX470, i mentioned Power compsumition consdering that reviews will mention It as competence of GTX1050/Ti
     

  5. Agonist

    Agonist Ancient Guru

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    Don't be so triggered.

    Power consumption is ruined with any overclocking anyways.
    The obsession with power consumption is so damn laughable at times.

    Its only an issue if you leave your pc on 24/7 folding, converting video, or have zero life outside of playing games 25+ hours a week.
     
  6. ruggafella

    ruggafella Member

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    ...or if you have a puny PSU and I figure most people looking at the 460 and 1050 cards aren't those upgrading from a GTX x80 or Rx x90/X with a big beefy 750w PSU already in their rig. One of the big selling points of the sub-75w cards is that they're drop in and play cards: you can take a basic office computer and drop this card in (with no further connectors) to make it a 1080p gaming machine. As soon as it requires a 6pin and higher power draw, and therefore needing a new PSU, you start to turn off some people otherwise interested in the product.
     
  7. vbetts

    vbetts Don Vincenzo Staff Member

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    Woah, chill out guys.
     
  8. tsunami231

    tsunami231 Ancient Guru

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    I dont like GPU that use 2 power connectors they cause coil whine much worse then 1 connector, So to be power consumption to me is kinda important
     
  9. Srsbsns

    Srsbsns Member Guru

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    That can happen if your PSU cant respond to rapidly changes is power demands. High quality modern PSUs have capacitors on the power cables to prevent this. I love additional connectors because that means I have more power delivery and usually more overclocking potential.

    "To reduce electrical whine/buzz associated with high performance graphics card’s dynamic loading changes, 2200uF capacitors are attached to PCI-E connectors. This design also helps to maintain better voltage stability and improve ripple & noise performance. "

    [​IMG]
     
  10. warlord

    warlord Ancient Guru

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    But can it run Tetris?:3eyes:
     

  11. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    I upgraded/changed lot of CAPs to better quality ones on my 3 Power supplies to get better results, i noted that higher Amp lines has 2200uF CAPs, a way to "upgrade" Power supplies is changing Electrolitic CAPs to higher voltage ones (with same uf), It will operate at lower temps... Im thinking to change a 400v 330uf for 2x 200~250v 330uf (in serial) to improve voltages
     
  12. Viper666

    Viper666 Active Member

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    How exactly does one improve voltages by changing the AC input filtering caps, as they do nothing more than to filter the ripple of the 110/230V fed into the PSU. Higher voltage caps on the secondary side do absolutely nothing for higher line voltages as there are 16V caps on the 12V line which is more than enough and impossible to surpass normally without your PSU shutting dows from the failsafes.

    Changing them with higher capacity caps as 2000uF+ does not improve voltage from the "higher" uF count, but from the lower ESR. The ESR is what causes caps to gain "resistance" and lower the circuit voltage as they age.
    Keep in mind that if the original ones were around 1000uF, higher ones may cause high stress on the VRM and cause issues in the feedlack loop.

    Furthermore caps do not produce heat on their own, they get heated by nearby coils, hearsinks, diodes and voltage regulators which shorten their lifespan as the temperature goes up. The only way to keep them cool is by ditching the "intelligent fan control" of the PSU which might turn off the fan completely under 50 degrees which is complete BS, and powering it directly from a molex so it has full speed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
  13. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    Maybe i wrong writted...

    The Powersupply has a lot of different CAPs, different uf for every lane (-12, -5, 3.3, 5, 12, 5SB), if you put higher voltage CAPs no higher uf (capacitancy is inverse to voltage, higher uf = lower voltage out on a transformer), maintaining uf and putting higher voltage CAPs they will operate @lower temps, other thing, remenber that main (input) CAPs must support all system load, again higher voltage CAPs will operate at lower temps
     
  14. Viper666

    Viper666 Active Member

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    Caps DO NOT produce heat unless their ripple current ratings are exceeded or have a very high ESR which would make the circuit fail anyway. The only positive thing about replacing any cap with a higher voltage rating is that it may last longer depending on voltage spikes/ripple. Claiming that higher voltage in caps reduces heat is bogus and so is that higher/more main input caps equal more power/stability.

    Also it's generally agreed that it's datasheet lifespan doubles for each 10 degrees decrease in temperature from their maximum tolerance (85/105degrees).
     
  15. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    Okay, well
     

  16. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

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    Nonsense. Capacitors produce heat, period.

    Realrealistic, nonideal capacitor means ESR > 0 --> heat = I^2 * ESR > 0

    How can someone use term like ESR, and at the same time proclaim that caps do not produce heat, is the real puzzle here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
  17. Viper666

    Viper666 Active Member

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    Yes, they have a slight power loss from combined Ripple + ESR which is greater than 0 and translates to some degrees, but inherently remain at room temperature if they are not used out of specs. What i was trying to say is, they are usually the least heat producers inside any PSU or circuit, and usually get heated up by nearby heatsinks, mosfets, vrms, diodes etc so it's rather useless to replace them with higher voltage ones and claim they will become cooler.
     
  18. Amx85

    Amx85 Master Guru

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    :) even far from other componets they produce heat, not much but produce, remenber that these CAPs are in serie to the circuit, then they must support all system load
     

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