PS4 Hardware.

Discussion in 'Consoles & console games' started by Strikerx80, Nov 17, 2012.

  1. gamerk2

    gamerk2 Ancient Guru

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    Nope. All the timings for every single I/O device have to be 100% spot on, and PCs aren't anywhere close to being able to do this for a console like the PS4.
     
  2. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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  3. Stone Gargoyle

    Stone Gargoyle Ancient Guru

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  4. lucidus

    lucidus Ancient Guru

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    It's always a good sign to see devs excited about new hardware.
     

  5. Raiga

    Raiga Maha Guru

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  6. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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  7. 8800gts320mb

    8800gts320mb Master Guru

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    Im very interested in the ps4 sold the pc due to lack of games! !

    But what I want to no is
    Will the ps 4 have antianalising or what ever ?!

    What the max res the console can output? I want 1080p or above!!

    Will games be 30fps or 60 fps! I did hear that witcher 3 is going to be 30fps!!!!!! Thats not good in the early stages of console life!! CMON ITS 2013 THINGS SHOULD HAVE IMPROVED BY NOW!!
     
  8. CPC_RedDawn

    CPC_RedDawn Ancient Guru

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    The thing is 30fps is fine for 90% of gamers out there. Sure 60fps is the sweet spot. But if you cap the fps at 30 then you can push the hardware even further in terms of visuals. For PC gaming 30fps with a mouse is simply horrid, but with a controller it still feels relatively smooth. Try it, cap your game with dxtory or another program and use it with the mouse and then a controller. The controller feels a lot smoother at this framerate. It also goes a long way depending on what engine the game is running. If the engine is optimized for 30fps then it will be smooth.
     
  9. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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  10. Aztek87

    Aztek87 Active Member

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    Its impressive the kind of visuals they are able to push with the heavily outdated PS3 hardware, I want to see what they will do with this.
     

  11. (.)(.)

    (.)(.) Banned

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    ^this. Killzone 2 and mor so no.3 blew my mind with their visuals, crysis 1 was the last game that made wow the way kz 2/3 did. Sure 720p, but with your screen at the right distance and with sharpness turned down just enough to hide the jaggies, Id have to say it was the most visually spectacular game ive seen this generation without a doubt, and all the more when you take into account how old the hardware is.

    Also, 9/10 for gameplay - must have fps, cannont believe its not more popular more so when it comes to mp.

    The pc could learn alot.

    Also if anyones up for a game of mp on kz 2/3 pm me on guru.
     
  12. Darren Hodgson

    Darren Hodgson Ancient Guru

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    I agree with you for the most part but even though I play every PC game I can with an Xbox 360 controller (yes, even first-person shooters like Crysis 3 and BioShock Infinite!), I still find a 30 fps to feel and look less smooth than it does on an Xbox 360 or PS3. For example, I bought Batman: Arkham City for my Xbox 360 and it felt and looked smoother than the PC version did when I capped that to 30 fps. I've no idea why though. Maybe it's partly to do with sitting closer to a monitor screen such that I can see the difference in smoothness between 30 and 60 fps? Whatever, what I'm trying to say is that while I don't mind 30 fps console games, I don't especially like 30 fps PC games.
     
  13. gamerk2

    gamerk2 Ancient Guru

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    Probably not much more then we have on PC's now. Consoles are now mini-PC's, so you aren't going to see much low-level assembly anymore to squeeze every ounce of power out of the machines, you are going to see the same high level API's used across consoles/PCs.

    I'm really not expecting much this generation.
     
  14. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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    To be honest I was talking to a friend of mine in a pub the weekend about 60 fps on pc is a minimum but games on the ps3 like uncharted, resistance, killzone are fine, I would rather a cap at 30 fps with better graphics effects ect than trying to get 60 fps with less. Btw for me killzone 3 and resistance 3 are the bollox single player.

    And something else resistance 2 co op is fucxing awesome for me it really is.


    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2013
  15. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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    http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/191007/inside_the_playstation_4_with_mark_.php

    The PlayStation 4 is due out this fall, and its technical specifications have been largely under wraps -- till now. While the company gave a presentation at GDC, the system's lead architect, Mark Cerny, hasn't talked publicly in any great depth about the platform since*its unveiling*this February.Cerny approached Gamasutra in the hope of delivering a "no holds barred PlayStation 4 hardware expose," he said, during the interview that resulted in this story. "That certainly is what we're here to do," said Cerny, before speaking to Gamasutra for well over an hour.What follows is a total breakdown of the hardware from a developer's perspective: the chips on the board, and what they're capable of.Questions on the UI and OS were off the table. What was up for discussion is what the system is capable of, and the thinking that lead Cerny and his team to make the decisions they made about the components they chose and how they function together.To get to the heart of this deeply technical discussion, Gamasutra was assisted by someone with an intimate knowledge of how console hardware really works: Mark DeLoura, THQ's former VP of tech and now senior adviser for digital media at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

    The Beginnings

    "For me, this all started in late 2007," said Cerny, remembering how he embarked on the road to becoming lead architect of the PlayStation 4. "Because we'd been doing postmortems on the PlayStation 3 -- a very broad group of people across the Sony Computer Entertainment team were evaluating how well that had gone."That lead, naturally, to thoughts about what to do next. Musing on the architecture of Sony's next system, Cerny spent his Thanksgiving holiday reading up on the history of the X86 architecture -- realizing that not only had it evolved dramatically over the years, but that by the time the PlayStation 4 shipped, it would be powerful enough for Sony's needs.It had evolved into something "that looked broadly usable by even the sort of extreme programmers we find in the games business," he said.Realizing how passionate he was about the PlayStation 4 project, after Thanksgiving, Cerny went to Sony's then-execs Phil Harrison and Masa Chatani, "and asked if I could lead the next generation effort. And to my great surprise, they said yes."

    "The Biggest Thing" About the PlayStation 4

    Cerny approached the design of the PlayStation 4 with one important mandate above all else: "The biggest thing is we didn't want the hardware to be a puzzle that programmers would be needing to solve in order to make quality titles."The PlayStation 3 was very powerful, but its unfamiliar CELL processor stymied developers. "There was huge performance there, but in order to unlock that performance, you really needed to study it and learn unique ways of using the hardware," said Cerny.That situation led directly to the PS4's design philosophy: "The hope with PlayStation 4 was to have a powerful architecture, but also an architecture that would be a very familiar architecture in many ways."In fact, this is something Cerny returned to again and again during the conversation. "We want to make sure that the hardware is easy to use. And so having the familiar CPU and the familiar GPU definitely makes it easier to use," he said.Later, when asked about whether Sony considers the fact that many third party developers will also have to create versions of their games for the next Xbox, his response was, "when I say that our goal is not to create puzzles that the developers have to solve, that is how we do well in a multi-platform world."But ease-of-use is far from Cerny's only goal. As a 31-year veteran of the industry, he well knows that the PC will march onward even as the PlayStation 4 stays frozen in time."Ultimately, we are trying to strike a balance between features which you can use day one, and features which will allow the system to evolve over the years, as gaming itself evolves," said Cerny. The "supercharged PC architecture," that the team has come up with -- to use Cerny's term -- is designed to offer significant gains the PC can't, while still offering a familiar technological environment for engineers.To design the PlayStation 4, Cerny didn't just rely on research, or postmortems of the PlayStation 3. He also toured development teams and spoke to middleware partners to find out precisely what they wanted to see in a next generation console. The result? You'll read about it below.

    What Does 'Supercharged' Mean, Anyway?

    The PlayStation 4's architecture looks very familiar, at first blush -- and it is. But Cerny maintains that his team's work on it extends it far beyond its basic capabilities.For example, this is his take on its GPU:*"It's ATI Radeon. Getting into specific numbers probably doesn't help clarify the situation much, except we took their most current technology, and performed a large number of modifications to it."To understand the PS4, you have to take what you know about Cerny's vision for it (easy to use, but powerful in the long term) and marry that to what the company has chosen for its architecture (familiar, but cleverly modified.) That's what he means by "supercharged.""The 'supercharged' part, a lot of that comes from the use of the single unified pool of high-speed memory," said Cerny. The PS4 packs 8GB of GDDR5 RAM that's easily and fully addressable by both the CPU and GPU.If you look at a PC, said Cerny, "if it had 8 gigabytes of memory on it, the CPU or GPU could only share about 1 percent of that memory on any given frame. That's simply a limit imposed by the speed of the PCIe. So, yes, there is substantial benefit to having a unified architecture on PS4, and it’s a very straightforward benefit that you get even on your first day of coding with the system. The growth in the system in later years will come more from having the enhanced PC GPU. And I guess that conversation gets into everything we did to enhance it."The CPU and GPU are on a "very large single custom chip" created by AMD for Sony. "The eight Jaguar cores, the GPU and a large number of other units are all on the same die," said Cerny. The memory is not on the chip, however. Via a 256-bit bus, it communicates with the shared pool of ram at 176 GB per second."One thing we could have done is drop it down to 128-bit bus, which would drop the bandwidth to 88 gigabytes per second, and then have eDRAM on chip to bring the performance back up again," said Cerny. While that solution initially looked appealing to the team due to its ease of manufacturability, it was abandoned thanks to the complexity it would add for developers. "We did not want to create some kind of puzzle that the development community would have to solve in order to create their games. And so we stayed true to the philosophy of unified memory."In fact, said Cerny, when he toured development studios asking what they wanted from the PlayStation 4, the "largest piece of feedback that we got is they wanted unified memory.""I think you can appreciate how large our commitment to having a developer friendly architecture is in light of the fact that we could have made hardware with as much as a terabyte [Editor's note: 1000 gigabytes] of bandwidth to a small internal RAM, and still did not adopt that strategy," said Cerny. "I think that really shows our thinking the most clearly of anything."
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2013

  16. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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  17. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/multim...cture_Details_It_Is_All_About_the_Speed.html?


    Sony Computer Entertainment this week revealed additional architectural details about the PlayStation 4 video game console. The company claims that while the semi-custom accelerated processing unit from Advanced Micro Devices inside the PS4 resembles the modern personal computers, it features a number of enhancements made to speed up peak*performance*as well as make it easier for game developers to simultaneously use x86 and graphics stream processors.Sony PlayStation 4 is based on a semi-custom AMD Fusion system-on-chip that integrates eight AMD x86 Jaguar cores, custom AMD Radeon HD core with unified array of 18 AMD GCN-like compute units (1152 stream processors which collectively generate 1.84TFLOPS of computer power that can freely be applied to graphics, simulation tasks, or some mixture of the two), various special-purpose hardware blocks as well as multi-channel 256-bit GDDR5 memory controller. As it appears, there are a number of enhancements designed to speed up graphics performance as well as make it easier for game developers to use the heterogeneous system architecture of the chip.“Our overall approach was to put in a very large number of controls about how to mix compute and graphics, and let the development community figure out which ones they want to use when they get around to the point where they're doing a lot of asynchronous compute,” said Mark Cerny, the leadarchitect*of PlayStation 4 system, in an interview with*Gamasutra*web-site.The PS4 SoC has three major enhancements not found on today’s PCs (it is unclear whether at least certain of those*technologies*will eventually make it to the PC, but it is highly likely):The graphics processor can write directly to system memory, bypassing its own L1 and L2 caches, which greatly simplifies data sync between graphics processor and central processor. Mr. Cerny claims that a special bus with around 20GB/s bandwidth is used for such direct reads and writes.To support the case where developer wants to use the GPU L2 cache simultaneously for both graphics processing and asynchronous compute, Sony has added a “volatile” bit in the tags of the cache lines. Developers can then selectively mark all accesses by compute as “volatile”, and when it is time for compute to read from system memory, it can invalidate, selectively, the lines it uses in the L2. When it comes time to write back the results, it can write back selectively the lines that it uses. This innovation allows compute to use the GPU L2 cache and perform the required operations without significantly impacting the graphics operations going on at the same time.* In general, the technique radically reduces the overhead of running compute and graphics together on the GPU.The original AMD GCN architecture allows one source of graphics commands, and two sources of compute commands. For PS4, Sony worked with AMD to increase the limit to 64 sources of compute commands. If a game developer has some asynchronous compute you want to perform, he should put commands in one of these 64 queues, and then there are multiple levels of arbitration in the hardware to determine what runs, how it runs, and when it runs, alongside the graphics that's in the system. Sony believes that not only games, but also various middleware will use GPU computing, which is why requests from different software clients need to be properly blended and then properly prioritized.Screenshot from Killzone Shadow Fall, a PS4-exclusive title.“If you look at the portion of the GPU available to compute throughout the frame, it varies dramatically from instant to instant. For example, something like opaque shadow map rendering doesn't even use a pixel shader, it is entirely done by vertex shaders and the rasterization hardware – so graphics are not using most of the 1.8TFLOPS of ALU available in the CUs. Times like that during the game frame are an opportunity to say, 'Okay, all that compute you wanted to do, turn it up to 11 now',” said Mr. Cerny.While the PlayStation 4 is very powerful already, there were ways to further boost its performance, but at the cost of increasing complexities for game developers. The company decided that minimal hassles for game designers is more important than additional performance and decided to steak to the current architectural solutions. The benefits of Sony’s architectural decisions will be seen in the PlayStation 4's launch*games."The launch lineup for PlayStation 4 – though I unfortunately cannot give the title count – is going to be stronger than any prior PlayStation hardware,” said Mr. Cerny.Sony PlayStation 4 will be launched later this year worldwide.
     
  18. boodikon

    boodikon Ancient Guru

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  19. Angushades

    Angushades Master Guru

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    You sir would be right, think about the crap they are going to add so the kids buy this junk, facebook , tweeter OMG even streaming your self while you suck and how you got the nuke in COD MW 2..... I don't understand why some many ppl buy such high-end rigs (in there profiles) yet prase this crap like its the holy grail, the only this good about this console and all others to come is the X86 processor. I think the os will be about 2gb with all the junk they are adding and too keep things fast, to do like facebooking* or tweeting about how your game is going it will stay in the memory.
     
  20. 8800gts320mb

    8800gts320mb Master Guru

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    Your completey wrong!!
    Ps 4 will use 1gig for os and the remaining 7 gig for gaming etc!!
    Cant give u the surce of info but ill try and find it

    U cant just guess what the ps 4 will use for os
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2013

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