Power outage did something to my pc.

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by IceVip, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. IceVip

    IceVip Master Guru

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    Recently i've been having a lot of power outages and the last one
    that hit me(there's probably 10000 more to come) did something that i can't
    i cant figure out.

    So after the power outage i turned on my pc, everything was fine..
    it booted to win fine, then i open after effects and as soon as it popped up
    i saw this weird glitch, like in the center of the monitor there were 10 RGB
    colored lines and the rest of the screen was black, first guess was gpu.

    I saw that glitch for 0.1 sec then the pc instantly shut down.
    So on the next bootup everything was fine, i repeated what i did and i
    opened after effects, oddly enough it didn't glitch. So i started benchmarking
    the pc, 3dmark 11 and aida's cpu benches, then i opened aida's disk bench
    and the program closed, so i opened the program again and this happened.

    http://i4.minus.com/innfhpzJzv38e.png

    when i move my mouse onto a icon, the icon shows and the black disappears
    but only for the section at which the icon was. like u see in the pic.
    Anyways does anyone have any idea what is causing this?
    gpu > artificial glitch after loading afx
    ram/disk > after closing aida64 out of nothing?
    gpu > the black screen with icons bug.
     
  2. Luigi2012SM64DS

    Luigi2012SM64DS Member

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    Your gpu could be fried. Maybe your hard drive could be the culprit? Good idea to run chkdsk after an outage.
     
  3. ---TK---

    ---TK--- Ancient Guru

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    Either the gpu or Windows got borked with all those poeer outage shutdowns. If u have a spare drive reinstall windows. .
     
  4. jbmcmillan

    jbmcmillan Ancient Guru

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    You should really think about getting a UPS chances are if you are having multiple power outages it is fluctuating as well.This will fry something over time.
     

  5. Darkest

    Darkest Ancient Guru

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    Definitely agreed, with that many power outages it's pretty much a necessity. Even for those that rarely if ever have problems like that I'd still recommend at least using a surge protector.
     
  6. Fender178

    Fender178 Ancient Guru

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    I am thinking that it either it is the Graphics card or your memory (RAM) that got fried. Because of the the way the screen is acting in your screen shot. Massive slow down.
     
  7. IceVip

    IceVip Master Guru

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    Thing is this shouldn't even be happening, i live in the capital of bulgaria, and for
    the first time since.. ever, the main just stops for 5 minutes per 4 hours and
    basically this is just absurd.. None of my friends have ups because this never
    happens here, i don't know what is wrong but this crap is continuing for a week
    now..
     
  8. nhlkoho

    nhlkoho Ancient Guru

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    I had the same thing happen to an old laptop and it ended up being the GPU
     
  9. westom

    westom Active Member

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    Power outages and low voltages do not damage any electronics. Anomalies that might cause a blackout might cause damage. A UPS does not even claim to protect from those anomalies.

    Your problem is why better computer manufacturers provide comprehensive hardware diagnostics. Diagnostics would have immediately identified a bad memory, GPU, or most every other part in the computer. Since most, using only wild speculation, are identifying most every computer part for the failure.

    For example, disk drive. Identify a disk drive's manufacturer. Go to their web site. Download a hardware diagnostic for that drive. Either the drive is good or bad - without any doubts or speculation. Same applies to other parts. Either get the manufacturer's diagnostic. Or download a third party diagnostic (ie Memtst86 to test memory).

    One system that can only be identiifed with a digital meter are many components of the power system. With a meter, one minute labor, and some instructions, then the entire power system can be exonerated. Or the defective part in that system identified.

    Follow the evidence is why a fewer and informed use meters, diagnostics, and other useful tools. Others, using a technique called shotgunning, just wildly choose some part to blame. First select which technique you will use.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  10. Darkest

    Darkest Ancient Guru

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    Power surges can, and they tend to walk hand in hand with problematic power systems. As for power outages not damaging electronics, that's not really the question now is it? There are components in computers that can potentially be damaged by sudden power loss, although it's far less likely now than it was with older hardware. The problems the OP describes are very likely connected to a power related issue, as I said: Everyone should at least run a surge protector.

    Troubleshooting hardware piece by piece is of course a given. That said, the statements the OP has made point to certain pieces of hardware being more likely to be at fault than others. That is part of the troubleshooting process, and good start area.

    PS: I was going to comment on your general attitude, but then I took a look at your post history.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014

  11. russ1

    russ1 Master Guru

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    I get power outages at least 4 times a day. Sometimes the power goes off for a few seconds, other times for a few hours. All i use is a power surge plug. I have used a UPS before but it seemed no better than a power surge plug and i have never lost any hardware due to power outage.
     
  12. westom

    westom Active Member

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    If any component can be damaged by a sudden power loss, then that component is listed. Was designing this stuff long before PCs existed. No part was damaged by a sudden power off.

    Well, older filesystems (ie FAT) once caused data loss. That weakness was eliminated after 1990 by newer (current) filesystems. Meaning even data on a disk drive is no longer deleted by a power loss.

    Sudden power loss does not damage or even threaten hardware. But the myth is popular in hearsay especially when the 'at risk' part cannot be listed.

    OP's symptoms are just as likely due to a change in Windows. Testing video without Windows (ie maybe on the Ultimate Boot CD) is more informative. Especially when no hardware changes (ie disconnected cable) is involved.


    Plug-in protectors do not even claim to protect from a type of surge that might also cause a power loss. Something completely different (unfortunately also called a surge protector) is required to protect robust electronics from those transients. And to protect less robust plug-in protectors.

    Anomalies that might cause a blackout can potentially cause hardware damage. A UPS or other plug-in protector does not even claim to protect from that type anomaly. But another, less expensive, and well proven solution does that protection. Meanwhile, the OP has no reason (yet) to even believe that caused his failure.

    OP has two strategies. One that just removes parts on speculation can also exponentially complicate the problem (ie suspecting CPU temperature or disk drive was not even probable). Another, faster, and easier solution identifies a defect before even disconnecting one wire. One can either shotgun or 'follow the evidence'.
     
  13. ---TK---

    ---TK--- Ancient Guru

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    I sure had data losses after 1990. And several borked windows installs due to power outages. You get a bsod at the wrong time can also bork windows installs too. Op problem may be a direct result of the power outages. A battery backup for the 5 minute outages is recommended to as he gets them frequently. As to whats borked either software or hardware is any body's guess as we do not have any real relevant info from op. To completely discount the power outages appears to be premature.
     
  14. westom

    westom Active Member

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    A problem that existed with Operating Systems that still used obsolete file systems including Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows ME.

    A power loss with those obsolete filesystems meant loss of data that was being saved. And also loss of an older file copy already saved to disk. Nobody today should have a filesystem that loses data on power loss.

    Power outages do not damage hardware. That myth remains dispite not even one hardware item identified as at risk. If a power loss can cause hardware damage, then please say how.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  15. Darkest

    Darkest Ancient Guru

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    You seem to change your tune a lot, at first it was 1990, now it's early 2000's? Make your mind up already. Power "loss" had the potential to damage HDD's in the past, although that isn't very likely with any modern drive. The problem as has been mentioned tends to walk hand in hand with power loss, power surges are not uncommon in areas that have problematic power supplies. Power coming back on after a power loss can cause surges and potential problems, and that's just to start.

    I'm not sure why but you have a tendency to skirt issues and give half answers, while presenting a passive-aggressive sentiment in your posts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014

  16. ---TK---

    ---TK--- Ancient Guru

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    Did he edit out the early 2000s part in his edited post?^^^^^
     
  17. Darkest

    Darkest Ancient Guru

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    Not that I can see, but Windows ME (which he brought up) was released in the year 2000, and support didn't fully end until 2006. Terrible O/S but the point stands.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  18. IcE

    IcE Don Snow Staff Member

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    Power loss can seriously mess up solid state electronics. It's fairly common for a line to be extremely dirty while it's being repaired. So while the outage itself won't break anything, the ripple that follows sure can. Modern PSU's can filter it to an extent, but it takes it's toll on the MOV filters and other related components. Dirty power is extremely hard on capacitors and will shorten component life. Surges are a different story. A large enough one can wreak mass destruction. Thankfully they're not very common, although most regular surge protectors are borderline useless in a major one (ala lightning strikes).

    So to sum up, a power loss in itself is unlikely to do damage unless it is accompanied by a surge due to the nature of the line failure. Leaving sensitive electronics plugged in without a UPS as a buffer subjects them to dirty power, especially when power is restored after an outage.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  19. ---TK---

    ---TK--- Ancient Guru

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    I see it now apparently windows me was released before 1990. As well as the other fat 32 os like 95 and 98.
     
  20. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    If write-caching is enabled or write cache buffer flushing is disabled, a sudden power loss has the potential to cause data loss or data corruption.

    With solid state drives, sudden power loss can damage the drive. It's a well known issue with some older Intel SSDs.

    "Sensitive electronics" should be plugged into a UPS with a built-in power filter. APFC UPS models cost a bit more, but they're well worth it.

    If the OP hasn't already, reinstalling Windows would be my first suggestion.
     

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