Opinions on new rig

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by milamber, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. milamber

    milamber Maha Guru

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    GPU:
    MSI 1080 Gaming X
    I've almost saved up enough for a new PC. My max budget is AU$4000. The following comes to about $3500. I've been out of the loop with PC hardware until recently so if there's any obvious bottlenecks please let me know. Not really going to bother overclocking and I'd like the PC to run reasonably silent, though I'm used to noisy PC so I can put up with a little noise.

    Intel Core i5 2500 Processor, 3.30GHz, 6MB Cache, Socket LGA1155
    Asus P8P67 PRO MB, Socket 1155, Intel P67 Chipset
    Leadtek PCIe GTX570 1280MB
    G.SKILL 4GB KIT DDR3 RIPJAWS C9 1600MHZ
    Alienware OptX AW2310 23" 3ms 1920x1080 Full HD 120Hz 3D WideScreen LCD Monitor
    Corsair 850W HX-850W Modular Power Supply
    CoolerMaster HAF RC-932 Tower Case
    OCZ VERTEX 2 120GB SSD 285/275 R/W/MB
    Western Digital Caviar Black SATA2/SATA 3 (1TB ) 7200RPM/64MB Cache
    Pioneer BDR-205BKRP 12X Blu-Ray Writer Drive, SATA, Black, Retail - with Cyberlink Software
    ASUS XONAR DX PCI Express 7.1 Audio Card
    Altec Lansing FX3022 Expressionist Bass 2.2 Dual 4" Subwoofer Speaker System 25W RMS
    Microsoft SideWinder X4 Keyboard
    Microsoft IntelliMouse Explorer 3.0
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium OEM (64-bit)
    NVIDIA 3D Vision Kit
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  2. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    GIGABYTE Radeon R9 280
    Cannot recommend because:
    • Sandy Bridge is out, why not Sandy Bridge CPUs? The 2500K works wonders.*
    • Do you really need a 3D monitor?
    • For gaming, I wouldn't recommend wireless keyboards/mouse due to latency.

    *Triple channel should not be the answer because unless you're benchmarking or running intensive memory applications like database server farms, triple channel is little to no use for the rest of the masses.

    deltatux
     
  3. Stingray

    Stingray Master Guru

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    GPU:
    Asus 2080 Super OC
    I agree with this, get yourself a nice G15 or other wired keyboard. I'd recommend MX518 for gaming mouse, best bang for the buck imho.

    Sandy Bridge k series is putting out some impressive numbers, route I'd go if building a new system.

    No opinion on 3D, those who have it, seem to like it.
     
  4. Mega_Death

    Mega_Death Maha Guru

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    Agreed, the 2500k is the way to go.
     

  5. milamber

    milamber Maha Guru

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    GPU:
    MSI 1080 Gaming X
    Changed 4 pieces of hardware thanks to the advice given me:

    Intel Core i7 2600 Processor, 3.40GHz, 8MB Cache, Socket LGA1155
    Asus P8P67 PRO MB, Socket 1155, Intel P67 Chipset
    Logitech MX518 Gaming Mouse
    Microsoft SideWinder X4 Keyboard

    What RAM should I get and how much (4gb, 6gb or 8gb)? I won't be upgrading this machine for a few years. PC will be used mostly for gaming (2D and 3D), as well as watching Blu-Ray.
     
  6. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
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    Get the 2500K over the 2600.

    The 2600 has no OC capability and do you really need the Core i7 2600?

    deltatux
     
  7. lehtv

    lehtv Ancient Guru

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    ^ What he said. And if you've already decided you're not going to OC, might as well get the regular 2500. It is plenty powerful at even stock clocks, and will run games very well. The memory for 2500 & 2600 go in pairs, so it's 4gb or 8gb for you. Don't get 8gb just yet unless you use memory intensive applications like video editing.

    As for the 2x GTX 460... a lot of people would say getting 1 card is always better than dual, if you can get the same performance out of it. Plus, you said you're not going to overclock, while GTX 460 is THE midrange card to overclock. If you really don't overclock GTX 460, I'd say you're better off with GTX 570, then upgrade or SLI that one if you need to later.

    +++ for the 120hz monitor though, they're awesome for gaming. Just don't get the Alienware crap, get ASUS VG236H or LG W2363D instead.

    As for Logitech MX518, it's a great mouse apart from having mouse prediction / angle snapping that you can't turn off. Consider Intellimouse Explorer 3.0 or Logitech G500 if prediction matters.

    While you can never have too much power in your PSU, 850W is slightly overkill unless you plan to upgrade to a dual high-end graphics card setup later. A good quality 600W power supply can run 2x GTX 460 or 1x GTX 570 without any trouble. If you need recommendations, Seasonic X-650 which I bought today to replace my noisy OCZ PSU is one of the best, if not THE best power supply available in that wattage range. At max it could even pull nearly 800W from the socket at 84% efficiency, and it is very silent in general usage (the fan really starts to increase RPM only in >50% use).

    Lastly, if you didn't know, Creative isn't the only company making sound cards. Asus has plenty of really good sound cards in their gaming lineup. I have been using Asus Xonar DX for about 5 months now, it's wonderful, largely thanks to the included Dolby Headphone feature. Makes games, music and movies sound so much better on my closed headphones.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2011
  8. milamber

    milamber Maha Guru

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    GPU:
    MSI 1080 Gaming X
    Graphics/CPU - Changed to Leadtek PCIe GTX570 1280MB and Intel Core i5 2500. I'll grab a second GTX570 when the price drops.

    Monitor - After reading several reviews of the ASUS and Alienware monitors I chose the Alienware because the screen is less glossy. I get a lot of sunlight in my PC room sometimes, otherwise the monitors are on par.

    Sound - Asus Xonar DX sounds good.

    Power Supply - Can't find Seasonic locally so I'll change it to a 750W Corsair.

    RAM - Changed to Corsair DOMINATOR-GT 4GB (2x 2GB PC16000) 240-Pin DDR3 2000MHz memory kit

    Total price of the PC now comes to AU$3500 which is pretty decent. Thanks for all the advice.
     
  9. Neo Cyrus

    Neo Cyrus Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    GTX 1080 Ti @ 2GHz
    A lot of the batches of 950s were reject chips so even if Nehalem was still the king it would be a bad choice. The reason I bought a Xeon was to stay as far away as possible from the batches of i7s they were selling at the time. It paid off, if I want to kill it with heat it can do 4.4GHz with an air cooler while the i7 950 I had didn't seem to be able to OC for its life, nothing I did stabilized it at 4GHz. 3.7GHz was likely the best it could do.

    Listen to what everyone says, get an i5 2500K. A i7 950 is still around $300 here while an i5 2500K can be found for under $230. Then smack yourself for even considering an i7 950.

    Edit: Seems you already decided on the parts, but $3.5K, is that typical for AUD prices?

    Here's something to keep in mind... buy an IPS panel if you can find one for a sane price. TNs are all 12 bit and use dithering to simulate proper colour, that and anything but the native res looks bad on them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2011
  10. milamber

    milamber Maha Guru

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    GPU:
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    My last PC was less than AU$2000 but it was mid-range and out-of-date when I got it 3 years ago. This time I want a beast that can handle HD movies, 3D and run the latest games with good FPS.
     

  11. Mufflore

    Mufflore Ancient Guru

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    Get 1.5V or less memory.
    Above 1.65V has been reported to be bad for the CPU.
    The G-Skill Ripjaw 1600MHz CL6 and CL7 versions come in 1.35V and 1.5V flavours and dont cost much either!
    CL6 being the quickest.
     
  12. Neo Cyrus

    Neo Cyrus Ancient Guru

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    I keep forgetting $1 AUD was like $0.60 CAD, but now they're close to equal so hopefully things get a little cheaper for you.

    Right this minute $1 AUD = $0.99 USD = $0.98 CAD.
    I thought the memory voltage doesn't matter so long as the... dang I forget, (QPI was it?) also has its voltage increased. If he searches around he can get DDR3-2000 for only a tiny bit more than DDR3-1600, he may as well stick with his original plan and get 2GHz ones.
     
  13. Mufflore

    Mufflore Ancient Guru

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    On my web travels I came across a message from an Intel engineer saying not to exceed 1.65V on memory as it can damage the CPU.
    I wish it was easy to locate.

    I would recommend faster ram but during my own research I found that the lower latency ram can clock just as high with the same or very similar timings and is much cheaper.
    This way you get the option of tightest timings / highest speed and cheaper price :)
     
  14. Neo Cyrus

    Neo Cyrus Ancient Guru

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    The same went for Nehalem CPUs, but apparently increased voltage on the QPI (or whatever it was) resulted in it being safe. Something about keeping the RAM voltage within 0.4V of the QPI. DDR3-2000 needs a minimum of 1.35V on the QPI/VTT anyway so the RAM requiring 1.65V isn't a concern at all. Also don't forget that even the RAM has a little vdrop.
     
  15. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    I still recommend the 2500K for the OP and not the locked cores.

    deltatux
     

  16. milamber

    milamber Maha Guru

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    The 2500K is hard to find in Australia but I'll look around for it.
     
  17. okidna

    okidna Active Member

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    GPU:
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    LGA 1155 processors does not support triple channel. Dual channel kit is a must for LGA 1155 (and 1156), whether 4GB, 8GB, or 16GB.

    And try to find RAM with 1,6v VDIMM or less. Above 1,6v you'll be risking your IMC.
     
  18. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    I did not say that LGA1155 supports triple channelling. What was said was that you should not use triple channel as a reason to not go for Sandy Bridge...

    deltatux
     
  19. okidna

    okidna Active Member

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    GPU:
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    Then why don't you just said : "Don't use triple channel kit for LGA 1155 platform" ? LOL
     
  20. lehtv

    lehtv Ancient Guru

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    If you're planning to get GTX 570 SLI, then it's a good idea to have a 850W power supply. Each GTX 570 adds about 210W to your power requirements, and you don't want to run the PSU anywhere close to 100% at full load; 50-75% is better as you'll achieve better efficiency and lower noise that way. Also, deltatux's 2500K recommendation isn't unfounded, as dual GTX 570 might be bottlenecked by a stock clocked 2500 processor. The 2500K is easy to overclock at stock voltages, just a grab a good cooelr and overclock it to where you're comfortable. You don't have to worry about memory clocks when overclocking, they're completely independent from CPU clocks in the Sandy Bridge processors.
     

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