New Technology Will Quadruple SSD Performance

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, May 26, 2014.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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  2. TheDeeGee

    TheDeeGee Ancient Guru

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    All fun, but as i said in another article.

    Id rather see them make affordable 1 - 2 TB SSDs. And with affordable i mean 200 Euro range.

    SSDs are fast enough already, the price is the bottleneck.
     
  3. Clouseau

    Clouseau Ancient Guru

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    Last edited: May 26, 2014
  4. Pvfc-Epic

    Pvfc-Epic Maha Guru

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    Error
    This story does not exist :(
     

  5. Toss3

    Toss3 Member Guru

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    The title is a bit misleading -> it won't quadruple performance unless the SSD is very low on storage space (<20%).
     
  6. Ven0m

    Ven0m Ancient Guru

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    Actually, I think it may affect the price substantially.

    The proposed solution appears to be obvious and straightforward. Yet, it's not been used so far. It should significantly decrease the flash rewrites, making TLC (and perhaps in the future quad-LC) more reliable. By improving effectiveness of flash writes, the manufacturers might use cheaper/denser modules, use less storage for wear leveling (and bad sectors backup), and spend less on RMAs, effectively reducing the end-user SSD price.
     
  7. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    It's appears to be a firmware principle, not strictly a hardware one (therefore, only licencing costs, if any, involved).

    I don't know whether it's a good thing in terms of manufacturers then using cheaper modules, I don't think it would be good to use lower quality/life expectancy modules than the current 'economy' versions. The standard user shouldn't have issues with RMA, unless they are bastardising the disk somehow, or if the disk is has stress related weak points.

    It's a good thing, don't get me wrong! But I would like to see increased longevity/reliability as a result, not manufacturers using the reliability headroom as an excuse to use low quality components.
     
  8. Ven0m

    Ven0m Ancient Guru

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    I get what you mean. I'd also like to see reliability increase. Regarding standard user and RMA - luckily I haven't experienced a single HDD failure in a few years, but got 3 SSDs dead recently. It doesn't look cool.
     
  9. Zydor

    Zydor Active Member

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    I've had two HD failures in the last few years, and zero SSD failures - that looks very cool.

    As always one rain drop doesnt make a thunderstorm.

    Nothing is perfect overnight, even our clunky hard discs of today were considered weird when first appearing on the scene. New technology takes time to mature and come into use. The fact that this is even on the drawing board is a big step forward.

    Lets see what the future holds, if they get this running across the whole available space ..... and work reliably ...... it will be yet another turning point in data storage. It sure as hell will not happen by yesterday, these things never do.

    Interesting development ....... lets reserve Armageddon comments for any final production version (if it appears), meanwhile, life goes on ......
     
  10. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    Were they bad sector related on the HDD's? Apparently there are 'soft' bad sectors, and 'hard' bad sectors. Soft bad sectors are just magnetic weakness (or whatever you want to call it), they aren't physical. Hard bad sectors are actual physical damage to the disk, either through the heads crashing against the disk, or some other surface damage. Apparently the soft bad sectors are much more common. They supposedly can be repaired, and I don't mean just using reallocated sectors.

    When you buy a new HDD, I have found if you run a 'clean all' command on it in diskpart (absolutely make sure you select the correct disk!) straight out, that they are actually more reliable. The 'fixing' of these bad sectors is supposedly done by writing 0's to it, and that is exactly what 'clean all' does. Then of course, there's the old suggestion that the Earth's magnetic field at the factory might be different to where you are, compromising the disk's magnetics, and that transport may have had the same affect... In any case, the 'clean all' command really does seem to be beneficial, at least once (or twice if you don't mind the extra time). This of course, has to be done before you put data on it.

    I've seen supposedly bad disks in terms of bad sectors come back to life after running clean all on them a couple of times. A friend's Seagate 2 TB drive was just like that beginning of last year He wasn't going to bother with RMA, although he had a good case! There were thousands of bad sectors and you could even it struggling to read some points of the disk. Ran 'clean all on it' four times to make sure... and it worked! No bad sectors, and has been flawless ever since. Probably could have gotten away with two or three times, but I decided to do it four times to make absolutely certain.

    Now, have you ever RMA'd a hard disk and got a 'refurbished' one back? How does that work? (the zeroing technique?).

    SSD's are great! But they aren't likely to replace mass storage anytime soon. There's a lot of research being done in improving magnetic storage. Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording is supposedly the next 'big' thing. Think 20 TB on a single drive, how exciting that would be! (the 'excitement' being the feeling you will have when it decides to fail on you).
     

  11. fry178

    fry178 Ancient Guru

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    Just because you low level formatted the drive, doesnt guarantee its ok.
    Seagates fail the most, but even with other brands it can happen.
    Use crystaldiskinfo to check the drives after u did the format and see if its healthy (blue).

    And i dont care about big hdds. If it fails, even more data is gone.

    Ssd's dont fail from reading, so as long as i dont fill em up, they will last me much longer than a hdd.
     
  12. peshkohacka

    peshkohacka Member Guru

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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2014
  13. Dch48

    Dch48 Ancient Guru

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    In my 15 years of using HDD equipped machines, I have never seen one fail or develop bad sectors. I have used a few for 8 or 9 years without problems. This includes 3 that came in Emachines computers.
     
  14. Corrupt^

    Corrupt^ Ancient Guru

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    Looking forward to that, as then buying a NAS will truely be worth its price for my personal needs.

    Though at that point I would SERIOUSLY consider a RAID1 setup...
     
  15. ScoobyDooby

    ScoobyDooby Ancient Guru

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    My friend I imagine this is quite uncommon, for someone to be around tech that long and not see a drive develop bad sectors.

    In my IT career which is at about 13 years now Ive seen many cases of soft and hard sector failures, sata interface and io failures, shock damage.. You name it. The drives that I've seen fail the most would be Hitachi, Toshiba, Fujitsu and Maxtor. I've seen more maxstor that any other fail over time.

    Have been able to get important bits of data off of failig drives numerous times after placing them in the freezer too.. It can work once in a while :)
     

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