New Ryzen Build - SLOW post

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards AMD' started by dk_lightning, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. dk_lightning

    dk_lightning Maha Guru

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    Oh my god is it SLOW to post.

    My now dead Z77 System would post in a matter of seconds and then a few more I'm in windows.

    This thing takes an absolute AGE. And on top of that if I press DEL to get in the bios at any point other than the split second I see the post screen it will hang and not do a damn thing. But I just want to try and sort this slow post out first.

    I using a Ryzen 5 1600 with an MSI X370 Gaming Plus on the latest BETA bios. I tried the latest stable BIOS as well and that was the same.
     
  2. LocoDiceGR

    LocoDiceGR Maha Guru

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    Common problem in Ryzen builds with MSI motherboards & the bios i think...

    What RAM are u using?

    Try contact MSI...

    With a quick google search you will find a lot ''slow post'' threads.
     
  3. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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    Typically slow posts are memory related, the motherboard is re-training in the post phase if it doesn't like a setting.
     
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  4. dk_lightning

    dk_lightning Maha Guru

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    So, what does that mean exactly? Something off with the memory timings?
     

  5. Agent-A01

    Agent-A01 Ancient Guru

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    Are you using XMP or w/e it's called for AMD?
    Memory training shouldn't be an issue on default jedec speeds.

    In short, memory training is an algorithm that accounts for voltage shifts on cold/warm boots to increase RAM stability..

    Did you set to uefi boot and disable Csm?
     
  6. Clouseau

    Clouseau Ancient Guru

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    What ram speed is currently being used? Have found that the slowest post is when the board is set to use the 2133 safe settings. It is painfully slow since I also have fast boot disabled in the bios. Subsequent posts when vddp, dram voltage, and soc voltage is set decently should be fairly quick. Have found lowering voltage, initially working backwards, has yielded the best results.
     
  7. dk_lightning

    dk_lightning Maha Guru

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    My RAM is 2133 OC to 2400. Boot speed is unaffected by this. And even if I use the XMP profile it makes no difference. I also have the "fast boot" option enabled. I am using a RAID setup so that does slow it down a little, even on my Z77 I had that.
     
  8. Kool64

    Kool64 New Member

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    I have exactly the same board with the crappiest CL16 3200 SK Hynix kit which will only run my memory at 2800 with two or four sticks. I noticed a huge boot time decrease with the 5.44 beta and up. However now I have a fun .3 voltage offset issue with the Vcore. Windows is reporting a bios boot time of around 15 seconds. That's down from over 25 on older bioses.
     
  9. dk_lightning

    dk_lightning Maha Guru

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    The other issue I am having is with the BIOS.

    If I turn my PC off, like when i go to work or sleep and then come back and turn it on again the BIOS will insist every time that the settings failed and I will have to reapply them and reboot. So I have started putting my PC in sleep mode instead as then I don't get this since its not a reboot. My overclock settings are stable and do work. I have had no crashes etc since I finalised my settings a few weeks ago.

    Put I did get this pesky PLN CORRUPT error the other week that was I was also getting when I first switched to Ryzen. Dunno what thats all about yet. Maybe when MSI releases a new bios with this new microcode and memory rework things will be better.

    It seems Ryzen is still "Growing Up".
     
  10. D3M1G0D

    D3M1G0D Master Guru

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    I think that's suggestive - the board may be having trouble with the settings (either that or the board itself may be faulty). My first board was a ASRock X370 Killer SLI and I had a lot of trouble with it in terms of stability (stable most of the time, but would suddenly become extremely unstable, especially upon a reboot). A couple of weeks ago, I replaced it with a MSI X370 Gaming Pro Carbon and it's been rock solid - so my ASRock board was probably faulty.

    I also have a MSI X399 Gaming Pro Carbon and boot times are decent for both my systems. A very long boot time is almost always indicative of problems, and the issues you are describing only reinforces this. Try swapping boards and see if it helps.
     

  11. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    I upgraded my board from an Asrock as well to the same board. The MSI board is great apart from the lacklustre bios. It's not really an issue though, most of the extra options exposed by other bioses are little benefit to most users. I think they just exposed every option available for some other brands due to the time factor of release. If you look through the Intel CPU datasheets, you will see there are a crapload of options that you won't see in board implementations.

    For example, Coffee Lake datasheet volume 2 (there's a volume 1 with feature info, volume 2 is about the registers). https://www.intel.com/content/www/u...cessor-family-s-platform-datasheet-vol-2.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2017
  12. DW75

    DW75 Master Guru

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    You two got lucky with your boards. I started with the MSI X370 Gaming Pro Carbon. My board was insanely unstable. It ended up getting worse and worse until the board would randomly just black screen and refuse to boot into windows. I had to keep doing CMOS resets. Before I replaced the board, I ended up having my RAM locking itself at 2133, and refusing to go any higher. It was not long until I got another final black screen, and the board never worked again. I now own the Asus ROG Strix X370-F Gaming board. The BIOS options are better, and the board is offering 100 percent stability. It is luck of the draw though. We all can get a bad board from any brand. This crappy experience has certainly turned me off buying another MSI though.
     
  13. D3M1G0D

    D3M1G0D Master Guru

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    Yeah, it happens, and I don't hold anything against ASRock because of my experience - I basically consider it the price of being an early adopter. The thing is, I originally chose the MSI board and only went with ASRock because the former wasn't available (severe mobo shortage). Chances are, if I had waited for my original (MSI) board then it could have been the one with problems instead.
     
  14. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    That's possible. I can't recall the version number on the board, and I'm not going to look because I can't remember where it was, probably on the side somewhere and covered with cables etc, but I'm sure it was higher than 1.0. It's in fairly small writing, you would probably only see it if looking closely when it's not in the case. Motherboard manufacturers bring out multiple revisions of the same board, the Asus ROG Strix board probably has been updated as well. It happens with most things, same model number but different revision, and that includes graphics cards, hard drives, microwaves, toasters... they actually put a disclaimer in the product manuals that the specifications may change without notice. Generally changes are quite small, a new model isn't warranted as it costs too much and you get product complacency. Sometimes for motherboards though there are more major changes, but again keeping the same model number. For Gigabyte, very minor changes retain the revision number on the product page, but when there are more noticeable differences they actually label the board as rev 1.1, rev 2.0 etc.

    I'll use their wifi cards as an example.
    [​IMG]
    GC-WB867D-I (rev. 1.0): https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GC-WB867D-I-rev-10#ov

    [​IMG]
    GC-WB867D-I (rev. 2.0): https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GC-WB867D-I-rev-20#ov

    [​IMG]
    GC-WB867D-I (rev. 4.2): https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GC-WB867D-I-rev-42#ov
    GC-WB867D-I (rev. 4.3): https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GC-WB867D-I-rev-43#ov

    Rev 4.2 and 4.3 look identical, so didn't post the pic. The specs are the same as well, so maybe a componentry change? As you can see between the three pics though, the very same card looks quite different between the versions, and have different features as well, but retain the same model number!

    Motherboards aren't likely to go through changes quite like that, but they do have changes. If you got a board you currently have directly off the manufacturing line now I would suspect in many cases it would have a different revision number.
     
  15. msroadkill612

    msroadkill612 Member

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    OP. You have to use logical deduction via trial and error to the extent u can - and hope its not the messiest one - mobo hardware.

    Reduce red herrings to a minimum - stick with standard settings for ram e.g. til running smoothly.

    do a thumb drive boot/start disk and remove raid array & note any differences? alternatively, mirror your boot drive to a HDD & eliminate the raid as a cause.

    split u ram up & try starting in different configurations - even individually works as a test i think? If one stick behaves differently, u may have isolated the problem.

    fortunately your problem doesnt require starting windows to reveal itself, so testing should be fastish.
     

  16. msroadkill612

    msroadkill612 Member

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    I really suspect the raid.

    You dont give details, but raid can involve some obscure bios, driver & controller settings. If you just transferred an adapter and array as is, i am not surprised really.

    while the raid is absent, see if the bios glitch on restart remains?
     
  17. DW75

    DW75 Master Guru

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    I am certain I know exactly what the issue is. You need to set up your memory speed and timings only by using the Memory Try It feature in your BIOS. I almost guarantee that will fix the slow boot. I had the exact same issue when I had my previous Crucial Ballistix DDR4 3466 kit and X370 Gaming Pro Carbon board. It would take 2 minutes to boot. I went in, and set up the RAM only using the Memory Try It feature to 2933 at 16-18-18-36. Sure enough, everything booted quick, as it should be.
     
  18. dk_lightning

    dk_lightning Maha Guru

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    Wow.. just.. wow.

    I have seen the Memory TryIt! in the bios but never touched it.

    I have 2 kits of ram in my system. Both are Corsair LPX but one kit is 2133 and the other is 2400.

    I have been running it at 2400 as that was all I could get to post. I took it as a limit of the slower kit. But Nope. I just tried the Memory TryIt! For 2400, works, Then 2667, Works.. I am now on 2800Mhz!

    My cinebench score has stopped rising now. I got to 1153 with 2400 and then 1243 with 2667 and now 1245 with 2800! I do not know if this is 100% stable yet but I will put it though some tests. I might even try and see how far I can push it. Can I get 3000Mhz? I am sooooo close! xD

    Thanks for saying I should "TryIt!" I didnt think it would work at all so never bothered with it but it seems to be working a treat!
     
  19. msroadkill612

    msroadkill612 Member

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    Excellent outcome.
     
  20. Athlonite

    Athlonite Maha Guru

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    Bingo even my RAID setup takes a little while too on my CHVF on a cold boot can take upto 20 seconds to show the raid bios and drives but once it through that and the post the actual boot into Windows takes only a few seconds
     

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