New Build Ryzen 5 3600 RX580 8GB Wins 10 Prepar3d V5 500PSU

Discussion in 'Videocards - AMD Radeon' started by Chris L, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. Chris L

    Chris L New Member

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    GPU:
    RX580 8GB
    Morning all.

    Built a new machine yesterday specifically to run P3d V5, went for the 8gb Vram the RX 580 as it requires more Vram tham the 4.5 version.

    However the build went brilliant my iiyama 25" G-Master Black Hawk Full HD FreeSync Gaming Monitor looks great.

    Have the latest drivers and software but I was disappointed when launching the sim that there preview window was black and when launching the sim all I get is a white screen with almost like a negative.

    Is there anyone out there that can come to my assistance or I will be returning the card and getting an Nvidia 1660 super with 6gb Vram.

    Really appreciate any help given.

    Kind regards
    Chris
     
  2. Chastity

    Chastity Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    Nitro 5700 XT
    The PSU is too low powered to handle transient peak loads.
     
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  3. bobblunderton

    bobblunderton Master Guru

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    GPU:
    EVGA 2070 Super 8gb
    When the person above mentions power supplies...
    I'd say not to go any lower than a Seasonic 620w psu unless you wish to live dangerously. Seasonic is more conservatively rated than most other brands, Seasonic rates at continuous load ratings, other brands may rate at peak (and worse yet some others may never be able to reach claimed peak loads without going off like dynamite in a mineshaft in 'an old Western').
    This leaves you two things - a little wiggle-room for upgrades, and also leaves the power supply operating in a more comfortable capacity>demand ratio, netting you better efficiency and less heat/noise. Power supplies also get weaker over time as they age, after 3 years have passed, some brands can lose up to 20~25% capacity of the unit (not even close on a Seasonic).

    Always purchase enough GOOD QUALITY power capacity when buying a power supply unit. Otherwise your components will lead a very short life. Things like voltage ripple, line noise, and other nasty things can be harmful to DC componentry and worsen as the unit gets closer to and then over rated capacity. There's a lot of units out there that will run clear past official capacity, but ripple, noise, etc will get out-of-ATX/EPS specification and therefor isn't good for your components. That and no-one wants the power brick in their computer casting the FIRE 3 spell in the middle of a good gaming session.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
  4. Chastity

    Chastity Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
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    I have a 12 yr old Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 1200 that is still performing due to the fact that I never really ever stressed it past 50% capacity. I originally bought it in preparation for doing a SLi setup, but that never manifested. The only issue I have now is the aging of the PSU introducing electrical noise that any USB attached sound device will introduce noise, and I have to use a USB power isolator to remove it.
     
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  5. bobblunderton

    bobblunderton Master Guru

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    GPU:
    EVGA 2070 Super 8gb
    Might have some dry-rotted plastic or rubber insulation in the PSU somewhere, may wish to open it up and have a look-see (just drain the power out 1st by unhooking it from the wall and then attempt to power the unit on first so you don't get blasted - likely you know this judging from your other comments - just listed for liability reasons. Don't need anyone's bones blinking/lighting up cause of me).
    Sometimes the rubber insulation hasn't cracked but merely shrank, exposing the ends of the wire on one or each end, that can be tough to spot if you're not familiar with a good fresh version of the unit.
    A lot of times if you get noise when using motherboard audio, a 50$ half-decent sound card can get rid of most/all of it IF it's coming through the speakers. Even isolated audio that's on the motherboard is subject to occasionally letting noise through. I've even had top-end 300$ or higher Asus boards that let noise through from the mouse, switching the power supply didn't seem to fix it.
    An Audigy Rx 5.1 or mid-tier recent-model creative / Asus / similar high-end soundcard should get rid of that noise issue, always did for me if it was an issue. Never could do much for the coil whine from video cards other than replace the card, but yes, every-time you move the mouse it makes a sound that can grate on you if you do a lot of 2D or 3D work on the PC.
    I used to get that A LOT with the older pentium 4 and core 2 motherboards from OEM's (cheap brand stuff) back then, but my Enermax Gigawatt used to do that a little bit too but not annoyingly bad.
    Pretty much any GOOD brand making 1200 watts is a fairly safe bet there, because so much money goes into those as-per the bill of materials... so it's not nearly as questionable like the 400~500 watt units that are dodgy sometimes unless you get a really good brand like PC power and cooling, Seasonic, sometimes FSP, Sparkle or Greatwall - but you have to check those out last two names on a per-model basis and keep an eye out for revisions changing the bill of materials. Example: I've gotten sparkle units (usually free!) that I wouldn't have even hooked a 10$ toy to - let alone a computer, but their server-line supplies the OEM's used to use a lot of, are quite robust and solid units. Even Corsair - will sometimes put out a great unit from Seasonic under the Corsair brand - other times it's a much more dodgy unit from another manufacturer that's not near the quality of a Seasonic without changing the model numbers to indicate such.
    I remember those SLI days, but I don't miss the 300~400$ power supplies to come with them, nor the fact that a typical SLI computer with barely a mild OC on the CPU could heat a whole uninsulated attic in the dead of a north-eastern winter. A 2070 Super + 3950x like this one here on the desk doesn't come even remotely close to the heating ability of those old ones!

    Barring the substation exploding or lightning nailing the house directly, that 1200 watt cooler master supply might out-last the both of us here...
     

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