Need advise from 10700k users [stock clocks] i want a silent build

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by Witcher29, Jun 21, 2020.

  1. Witcher29

    Witcher29 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    97
    GPU:
    1080 Ti Gaming X
    Right now my 5930k served me for years on stock, its time to upgrade to the z490 platform i am going for the MSI ACE. Temps on my 5930k on stock are 25c idle and 55c load.

    Now my main reason [consern] is temperature and noise, i want a pc thats only slighty hearable on stock settings like my old 5930k on the x99a godlike with a corsair h110i gtx. i always set my case fans to 50% power useage so its really calm and silent. The fan on my h110i gtx atm is 660rpm wich is unhearable and the pump is on a custom profile on 1900 rpm.

    Now my most important question is can i achieve a temp under 70c on load [playing games on 1440p] with a 10700k on stock with a corsair h115i platinum rgb edition while keep the pump silent ?

    Ram wise i am getting Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro CMW64GX4M4C3000C15 so its a slight oc over defaults 2933, with cl15 timings.

    So guys can i keep my rig cool with these things ?
    I also know the jump is insane from core to core and clock so ofcourse it will get a lil bit warmer but how much warmer on stock compared to my 5930k.

    Any advise is welcome.
     
  2. Witcher29

    Witcher29 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    97
    GPU:
    1080 Ti Gaming X
    No one got some experience on stock speeds while gaming with this cpu ?
     
  3. K.S.

    K.S. Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    2,297
    Likes Received:
    618
    GPU:
    EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC
    Well you could get a sound-proofed case and go full liquid. Not AIO. Zalman, Cooler Master, and BeQuiet all make some solutions if memory serves.
    • If the goal is to stay AiO than stay with Corsair solutions for various reasons; simplest of all longevity of the product and the quality of the pump and internals for one.
    • If you want a little more info do some research on other brands and how different pumps can have different draw-backs. Example, "Enermax AIO Liqtech" (Many YouTube video show the problem it had & it serves as a warning how you can end up getting suckered with some AiOs)
    • Diving deeper, Noctua makes these you may find of interest if you are a user who wants to stick with fans & keep the rpms lower https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NA-SRC10-Accessory-Low-Noise-Adaptors/dp/B00KG3KELQ
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2020
    Witcher29 likes this.
  4. Witcher29

    Witcher29 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    97
    GPU:
    1080 Ti Gaming X
    Yeah my h110i gtx is 6 years old now its still very silent, probably because i didnt do any oc on the cpu, also durability is still good, and its dead silent really. My only main concern is that these comet lake cpu,s can get pretty hot when oc-ed or when u use an air cooler.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2020

  5. bobblunderton

    bobblunderton Master Guru

    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    115
    GPU:
    EVGA 2070 Super 8gb
    If craving absolute silence, Noctua cooling makes many good solutions.
    The intel is not the most power efficient. You may want to trade off a few % performance (if truly stock, it's barely a few % and you're unlikely to notice much difference in anything), and go with the AMD Ryzen 3000 series VS the intel. It's really only worth paying the intel tax if you're going to have a high-clocking system to make the most of out chips (chips which excel at high clocks). Stock VS stock there isn't much difference unless you already have something like an 8700k or better (if you do already have a recent i7, then going to the AMD would net efficiency but not more gaming performance, and you don't need to upgrade).
    If you DO go AMD, get the (preferred brand) B550 or (MSI Max series) B450 boards, as the X570 has a chipset fan you will wish to avoid. It's really up to you on cpu/chipset brands and boards you want to run them on, as if you mildly underclock either brand, you'll be able to get a nearly silent machine easily. If you want a few % gaming performance or the ability to reconfigure/repurpose the system for higher-end gaming, go intel - conversely if you want a lot of cores for productivity, or other work tasks, go AMD (just keep in mind, AMD while power efficient on 7nm, starts to require beefy cooling past the 8-core models such as 3700x/3800x much like the intel 8-core models have). Not selling out for either brand or trying to sound as such, but these options you must consider first and foremost.

    Ball-bearing fans will always be louder (only notice when revving moderately but still a valid point), but can generally outlast other types of fan bearings. Make a trade off here, though anything with the Noctua name, or even names like 'Fractal' or 'Corsair' should be pretty good, among other brands. Try to avoid the cheap no-name brands you've never heard before. If pushing air through dense locations such as fins on a radiator, or pushing air up against/through a filter, you want static pressure over cubic feet per minute of air moved. Even if the fan is silent, you will still hear the sound of air being moved, or it buffeting things such as filters/vents/radiators.

    TL-DR If you stick to the factory spec for intel or AMD and stay with a 10600k/10700k / 3700x, and make sure your motherboard does not CHEAT power envelopes (there's been coverage of this lately) in regards to reported processor TDP's or turbo envelopes, and you make sure to not enable (for example) Asus 'multi-core enhancement', you should be able to make a fairly quiet system that only makes noise when it absolutely has to.

    Or just do what I'd do: Kick a hole in the wall and put noisy computer on other side of wall, connected with some usb and hdmi extenders through said hole, heh heh. Enjoy.
     
  6. Hardc0rHamburger

    Hardc0rHamburger Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    6
    GPU:
    1080ti
    I literally have done the same upgrade. While I was never going for silent. The max stable clock I could get with the 5930 all core was 4.5 with HT(4.6 without HT) it was at it's thermal limit. With the 10700k, with the same cooler, case. I can get 5.2 and it'll almost get to the thermal limit while occt testing. Also you can set your thermal limit now with these new cpus and it'll auto downclock it to keep within the limit. Also to add, the 5930 still holds up to the 10700k. I only got around a 20% increase in overall performance comparing the max OCs. The only reason to upgrade are for those single/dual thread games. OG Crysis got a good bump in fps because of the 5.2 OC.
     
  7. Witcher29

    Witcher29 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    97
    GPU:
    1080 Ti Gaming X
    I just want to know guys if u do run a stock 10700k with intel turbo boost on by default and a AIO u wont reach thermals like when u say u manually oc it ? and also keep the temp under 70c while the fans are on low rpm while gaming ?

    I have seen a few threads on the internet that some say they reach 55c while gaming on default stock clocks on a 10700k but i barely can believe that on AiO, thats incredible low.
     
  8. bobblunderton

    bobblunderton Master Guru

    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    115
    GPU:
    EVGA 2070 Super 8gb
    You might only get to 55C with a good loop, staying off prime 95, and running at true stock settings.
    If you set the turbo durations to be more conservative you will get the result you want. Just be aware as I said before that many motherboard makers like to 'cheat', so DO watch a few videos on how motherboard makers got caught changing PL1 / PL2 (intel) / Reported TDP (how they did it on AMD) cheating, and so-forth, to get a better understanding.
    While you won't gain much in the way of IPC / single-core speed, you are also passing up the memory bandwidth increase by going from older quad-channel to newer dual-channel.
    I honestly don't know if I'd even pony up for new stuff at this point if I was in your position, as a lot of what you're spending on will really only net a power bill (and room temperature) savings. There's not really anything you CANNOT run there with the old system, though a new one will save measurable difference in the power bill if you regularly keep it busy.
    Compromise: Build this as you would a normal gaming system, as you have your other, and keep it very conservative on the clocks as I mentioned above, while still having the 'room' to overclock later on in the system life to extend the useful life of the processor/board.
    You can also find XEON processors with higher core count (though normally locked), that can go on dual-channel mainstream socket (there's a special XEON-friendly chipset for intel chips since Skylake, they no-longer 'share' chipsets as they did before) or quad-channel x299 HEDT platform that are directly suited to what you look for. So definitely consider some XEON options, though there might not be any direct equals to the 10700k as the XEON release schedule often trails behind the mainstream k-series release schedule by a matter of months.
    Again, if you are going from a 3 year old HEDT system to a enthusiast-mainstream solution, you might not feel too much of a difference (aside of temperature!), even if you throw in an NVME drive and some peppy RAM. However, that said, it does nothing to help your upgrade itch if you only think about upgrading.
    --That is all I have on the topic.
     
  9. Hardc0rHamburger

    Hardc0rHamburger Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    6
    GPU:
    1080ti
    The temps on these new CPUs are better than previous gen. If you're not planning on OCing there is a non K 10700 that's cheaper.
     
  10. Witcher29

    Witcher29 Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    97
    GPU:
    1080 Ti Gaming X
    Yeah but there base is way lower then the k version :(
     

  11. MegaFalloutFan

    MegaFalloutFan Master Guru

    Messages:
    745
    Likes Received:
    95
    GPU:
    RTX 2080Ti 11Gb
    I just got 10700, I was on AIO before but this build is future home server so im doing AIR, I ordered Noctua D5s, but right now im on old 212 EVO with single noctua fan.
    I got this CPU based on this review and it rivals and beats by 1-2 fps 10900K Stock in 1440P and 4K gaming.
    They also tested it "overclocked" and so I did the same, z490 asus mobo has option to increase TDP for unlimited boost, and also this CPU runs fine with 102.6 BCLCK, so im getting 4712Ghz on all cores.
    Anyway, as far as temps, im idling on 40 and during benchmarks it spikes to 85 and thats on trash air cooler.
    When ill use it for home server ill keep it on 65W and turn on all energy saving features, but for day to day use right now its as fast as my old 9900K I get on CPU-Z benchmark between [I dont know why but it always changes] 500 to 526 single core and between 5000 to 5200 multi core score
     

Share This Page