NEC to Integrate Raspberry Pi into Monitors

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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    NEC will be integrating Raspberry Pi into selected monitors. By doing so NEC hopes to deliver a product that easily can be used for presentations and commercial application. We are talking about displ...

    NEC to Integrate Raspberry Pi into Monitors
     
  2. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d Master Guru

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    I'm guessing this will go over about as well as their screens that had Atom based single board computer modules available for them at an exorbitant price.

    The things are pieces of junk. Slow, can't take more than 2GB of RAM. Super flakey. No updates, and eventually just die.

    I expect them to not have any better support for these new ones.
     
  3. rl66

    rl66 Ancient Guru

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    i would said:

    -inexpensive
    -powerfull for what it is intended to do
    etc etc...

    and about those board with Atom, it was the 1st of a long series that isn't dead yet and are even now in i7 / i5 low voltage.

    it's not because you don't need it that it is crap, if some found them usefull it's a success (as the pi :) )
     
  4. Xionor

    Xionor Member

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    I'm not sure you understand what these are intended for. It's not for users.

    It's for example for animated billboards and advertisement screens.
    Instead of powering them through a computer or hub of some kind tethered with many-meter long cables, you make them almost completely self-sufficient by putting the Raspberry in there, since it only needs a power connection.
     

  5. Dch48

    Dch48 Ancient Guru

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    I have a 2 in 1 10" tablet that has an Atom Z3735F CPU and 2GB of RAM. It's running Windows 10 and any software I throw at it (except games) and is surprisingly fast and stable. It will play the original Half-Life and Unreal on Steam and they say it can run Half-Life 2 but I haven't tried that.

    Bottom line; there is nothing wrong with Atoms or the Pi when used in the ways they are suitable for. I think NEC is doing something really smart here.
     
  6. TimmyP

    TimmyP Master Guru

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    Off topic, but I also have a tablet with the same specs. (Acer One 10) It will not only play HL2 with ease, it will play Skyrim. You might need to get 8.1 on it tho. Noticeably faster.
     
  7. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d Master Guru

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    They were actually purchased as screens for cycling through different information screens in different buildings. They should have been fine for that.

    These were the older Atom setups that were total crap, overheated, and were generally very unreliable. After getting a few replaced under warranty more than once, I gave up on them.

    They would FAIL to even POST part of the time. The keyboard and mouse would not work unless plugged into specific USB ports. Any time I had to reboot them, it would literally take 10 minutes for them to boot back up.

    And anytime updates were installed, it would take at least an hour for them to complete... and the updates would regularly fail. If there were a bunch of updates, I would just let it do it's thing for 2-3 hours and then come back later, usually to find out that most if not all of the updates had failed.

    In those instances, I would have to sit there and install the updates one at a time, rebooting after every update. Not fun spending all day updating a single system.

    Re-imaging them from scratch had no positive effect on them and they would just do the same exact thing.

    If the power went out, all but one would not boot back into Windows until I manually booted into SAFE mode and then rebooted again.

    They originally came with some version of Linux installed, but the software for interfacing with them that came with them basically didn't work as advertised so we had to put Windows 7 on them.

    NEC support was horrendous and a huge pain to even contact.

    NEC NEVER had a single BIOS update for these things even though they were ridden with bugs.

    The 40" screens with an Atom unit were somewhere in the range of $3,000 each.

    I finally got sick of the pieces of trash and replaced them with Dell Optiplex 3010 SFF computers that fit between the wall and the screens.
     
  8. rl66

    rl66 Ancient Guru

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    were very good and reliable for presentation of a cave... never got to support until the change in 2015 when they goes to android tablet system...

    i guess you should had returned it for defect and maybe your experience would have been better
     
  9. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    Usually when Intel is involved in embedded devices (including highly mobile devices), things don't fare too well for them. Usually, because of price point. I wouldn't suspect that was NEC's fault.
    Says the person with a seriously overkill amount of RAM for what is presumably a gaming and media PC. Though 1GB is a bit low, don't forget this is ARM we're talking about here. Even 64-bit ARM applications use a lot less RAM than x86. Also when you consider that Windows and the bloatware associated with it isn't involved, 1GB on a platform like this is adequate. Just don't expect to have 10 Chrome tabs open at the same time.
    As for being flakey, out of date, or overall failures, are you sure we're talking about the same product here? There are a bunch of crappy ARM boards out there that don't get proper support, but the Pi is not one of them. The hardware may be mediocre, but the huge community adds a lot of refinement. Hardkernel, meanwhile, make fantastic boards but their long term support is horrible.
    Possibly, but the good thing is RPi is designed to be an upgradable platform. It generally doesn't take much effort to just swap out the board, albeit, the OS needs to be replaced. But now that the Pi is moving toward ARMv8, it should be a lot more portable.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
  10. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d Master Guru

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    I wasn't the one who ordered them.. or even chose to order them. The high ups at corporate had to have something NOW and that is what was available back then.

    We did get the computer modules replaced a few times as I said. It didn't help except in the case where the module had completely died.
     

  11. cyclone3d

    cyclone3d Master Guru

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    The "price point" of these crappy modules was about $800 at the time.

    Before we moved to Windows 7 on them, I had super bare bones XP running on them with as many services disabled as possible as well as the absolute bare minimum running on them that I could get away with and them still function. XP was not any better than 7 on them, even with a bunch of stuff disabled.

    Doing anything would usually max out both threads to 100%

    These were the older Atom pieces of trash that should have never been released.

    As for me having 32GB of RAM in my system. I also use it for programming, photo editing, etc. While I generally do not use anywhere near the amount of RAM I have installed, RAM is pretty cheap now so I see no reason no to have this much.
     
  12. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    But again - this is a totally different piece of hardware. Even the first RPi's CPU is probably better than the original Atom. You can't run Windows XP or 7 on these devices.

    Even by today's standards, XP is bloated for how little it can actually do.
     

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