Naga Bhut Jolokia [aka: Ghost Chilli]

Discussion in 'The Guru's Pub' started by Extraordinary, Apr 10, 2014.

  1. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    I have a few of those growing also, but I am thinking the Brown Moruga is going to be hotter.

    EDIT:

    One of my favorite recipes: (I forget where I found it on the interwebz, so credit to the original author, whomever it was)

    (You could substitute the Bhuts for the Habaneros, probably 1:2 ratio)

    Pineapple Habanero Sauce

    Ingredients:
    4 cups sugar
    1 cup apple cider vinegar
    1 cup pineapple juice
    3 Tbsp lemon juice
    3 Tbsp cornstarch (mixed with a bit of water to create slurry)
    1 medium to large pineapple, roasted, finely chopped
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    1 red pepper, finely chopped
    1 yellow pepper, finely chopped
    1 mango, finely chopped
    5-6 habanero peppers, roasted, finely chopped

    Create a simple syrup in a large pot by whisking the sugar, vinegar, pineapple juice and lemon juice over medium high heat until the sugar dissolves. Turn up the heat and bring to a boil for 2 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit while you prep the remaining ingredients.

    Roasting the pineapple and habaneros will bring out their inherent sweetness and richness. This can be done on your grill outside or using a grill pan on your cook-top. (I chose to use my George Foreman since it was pouring rain outside when I was working on this recipe.) Slice the pineapple in rings and grill until the sugars begin to caramelize and creates grill marks on both sides.

    Note: Before finely chopping my pineapple I trimmed away the outer rind.

    Lightly char the skins of the habanero peppers over an open flame or on a searing hot grill pan. Do not grill your red and yellow bell peppers in order to maintain some crunch and texture in the sauce.

    Make sure the habaneros are super finely chopped. If you want to tone down the heat slightly carefully remove the seeds. (I used my chopper so that I would not have to touch the peppers - I have a habit of getting hot pepper oils on my fingers and touching my eyes. The pepper oils not only make your hand tingle but burns like crazy on your face. NOT FUN! Additionally, the chopper allowed me to make sure the peppers were in super tiny pieces so no one bites into a large piece of super hot pepper.)

    Next, finely chop all fruit, peppers and onion into 1/4" pieces (or smaller). Stir the remaining ingredients into the simple syrup you prepared earlier. Stir in the cornstarch (mixing with a few tablespoons of water first to create a slurry). Bring the mixture to a boil and the turn down the heat to simmer for 5-10 minutes. The consistency should be syrupy and chunky.

    This recipe makes 4-5 pints of sauce. The sauce may be canned using a water bath for 15 minutes. Or placed in jars and frozen. Sauce should remain fresh in the fridge for approximately 2-3 weeks (if it lasts that long).

    As with the store bought sauce, it is the perfect pairing with so many things including chicken, pork, fish and seafood. It makes a great appetizer when partnered with cream cheese or goat cheese and used as a dip or a topping on crackers or croutons. We love it to just dip tortilla chips (alongside a margarita and life is good).
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  2. scipio

    scipio Ancient Guru

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    serranos are the best all purpose pepper
     
  3. elkosith

    elkosith Maha Guru

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    My limit is one or two of these in one serving.
    Birds eye chilli:
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    Nice thanks

    You'll have to post back when you've tried your Moruga Scorpion - when my Carolina Reapers arrive I`ll do the same, they are currently holding the Guinness book of records for the worlds hottest pepper
     

  5. Illnino

    Illnino Master Guru

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    I have the Scorpion Trinidad bt growing in my garden, It has a nice flavour and the heat is right out there. I am open to hotter though lol
     
  6. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Ancient Guru

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  7. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    :D I saw that a few days ago when I discovered the Caroline Reaper, but according to one UK guy on YT who drank some diluted on camera, he says since February, it's banned in the UK now

    Not sure how true that is, but there are some 40% bottles on ebay, and last I looked there was a sealed original one of the 999 bottles for £150
     
  8. Palerider

    Palerider Ancient Guru

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    I bought a pack and tried a little bit. Mostly in chili, but I also made some puree with tomatoes and it's sort of a thin salsa. Hotter than the devil's ass but strangely my daughter (who was 11 at the time) had no problem with them. Zero. Not even hot to her. After watching a few videos I gave her a pin dot sized dose and expected her to stop asking me to try. Instead she steadily increased the size of her bites.
    I still wont give her too much because I'm afraid it will mess up her stomach, but she loves showing off for her friends.:3eyes:
     
  9. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    lol, they have arrived (And someone can't count)

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    Yes, but there is some debate in the community about how Ed achieved his 'record'.

    Jim Duffy, developer of the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Blend, (the previously acknowledged record, although Jim did not feel it necessary to pay Guinness to list his pepper), submitted seeds to the Chili Pepper Institute at the University of New Mexico for them to independently grow and test.

    From what I have heard, Ed grew his own, and submitted them to another lab for testing.

    It has been suggested that by carefully controlling environmental factors, Ed was able to artificially manipulate the capsaicin levels of the Reaper, whereas the CPI-grown Morugas were left to grow naturally under prevailing climate conditions.
     

  11. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    A closeup of one of my Brown Moruga Scorpion peppers.

    [​IMG]

    A bit of friendly advice; DO NOT EAT ONE! Quite possibly the most painful experience, ever.
     
  12. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    Well, it has been a while, thought I might do an update.

    I dehydrate most of my peppers, giving away some fresh ones or using for sauce/salsa.

    A picture of dehydrated Brown Moruga (left) and Carolina Reaper (right).

    [​IMG]

    I flaked (coarsely ground) some of each and did a 'taste test'. I only used a single flake, approximately 1/4 inch square.

    The Brown Moruga had instant burn, lasting about ten minutes.

    The Reaper took about fifteen seconds to kick in, but lasted a little longer.

    Both were exceptionally hot, with strong c. chinense flavor, the Reaper being quite a bit stronger flavor-wise.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2015
  13. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    Turns out the dehydrated Jolokias don't keep their heat for long, since making this thread, I gave the last 4 peppers to the missus's brother to make a curry with last week, including about 4-5 Cayennes I grew last year, curry arrived, I ate the entire thing, only a slight tingle on the tongue, eaten hotter brown sauce

    My Jolokia plants I grew never produced any fruit, too cold here I think, still have two alive on the kitchen windowsill looking sorry for themselves, if they are still alive in the summer I`ll see if they can be revived

    I think this year I'm gonna grow them under heat lamps and on heat trays for their whole season, putting them outside turned them from healthy plants to greenfly infested weeds with holes in all the leaves
     
  14. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    I find that if kept tightly sealed, most dried pods will retain heat and flavor for many months. However, if left exposed, they do tend to lose both.

    I live in Zone 6a http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html and one of my Bhut Jolokia plants gave me at least two hundred pods last season.
     
  15. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    Im in the UK, so it doesn't get that cold, but I read the roots need to be kept around 70-80f, and it wasn't reaching those temps very often last summer, definitely not through the night - should have kept them indoors, at least one of them, they take forever to grow

    I think bugs did a lot of damage too though, first ever time growing things though, so a learning lesson for this years attempt
     

  16. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    Actually, this last summer was sort of mild here, only a few days in the 90°s, most nights in the mid to upper 60°s.

    The insects, however, are another issue. Even with ideal temperatures, they can wreck havoc with the plants, causing them to not produce.

    I try to grow as organic as possible, never using insecticides or herbicides, and using natural fertilizers as much as possible, although I sometimes give a struggling plant a shot of Miracle Grow.

    You might look into predatory insects. For example; here in the States we use Ladybugs, Preying Mantis, or predatory mites as natural insect control. Or, you could do it the easy way, and go with chemical alternatives.
     
  17. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    I used copper strips around the pots for the slugs/caterpillars - but wasn't prepared for the green/white flies with it being my first time growing anything, this year I`ll be well prepared

    Probably try chemicals (as harmless as possible) this time around, Im growing either in the house or in a small concrete back yard with a plastic greenhouse on wooden packing crates, so not ideal for things like ladybugs etc to enjoy living there

    Everything stays in pots too, no garden - I was thinking about building a raised bed at one side of the yard, but again the temperature is never great here, and if it does hit the right temperatures, it never lasts long, for things like Jolokias they need a consistent temperature above 70f from what I've read, and we never get that for more than a day or two at a time
     
  18. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    I see... well, good luck, and let us know how it goes.
     
  19. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    Thanks, will do, hopefully better luck this time around
     
  20. Arctucas

    Arctucas Ancient Guru

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    @Extraordinary,

    So, are you doing the hot pepper thing this year?

    If so, maybe we can compare notes?
     

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