Multiboot Boot Manager

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by alogoc, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. alogoc

    alogoc New Member

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    Hi everybody on the forum,

    I was searching for the "best" and most reliable boot manager for multiboot situations. So I though, I should drop by and create a thread to share our experiences and tips.

    In my case, I have a Desktop with four hard disks (2 SDD & 2 old but running mechanicals). What I want to do is multibooting, since I had good experience with dualboots in the past.

    The Operating Systems I want to use, each one in different disk, is Windows 7, Linux and OSX (Hackintosh). Never done that before, so before I mess things up,it would be nice if anyone has any experience or tips to share about what boot manager should I use, and which one is more reliable for this situation.
     
  2. umeng2002

    umeng2002 Maha Guru

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    Would you even need a boot manager? just go into the BIOS every time to select which drive to boot off of...
     
  3. alanm

    alanm Ancient Guru

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    EasyBCD. Have used it in triple boot systems, Win7, Xp and Linux. And its free.
     
  4. alanm

    alanm Ancient Guru

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    LOL. You seem to have a high tolerance for hassle or bother. :D.
     

  5. alogoc

    alogoc New Member

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    Sure, it's a very smart choice to boot every single time on BIOS and decide which disk you want to boot.... thanks for your idea on EasyBCD though :)
     
  6. Mufflore

    Mufflore Ancient Guru

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    I agree with him entirely.
    Often you dont need to go into the CMOS, I can hold F12 and it gives me a boot menu.

    For this method to work every time, when you install the OS to a particular hard drive, all other drives must be removed.
    Once the OS is installed, connect the other drives again and simply use the Boot menu to change OS.
    This method makes each OS install completely independent of the other drives and OS installs, so if one drive or boot system screws up, it only affects that one drive and its OS install.

    I use it to switch between a test installation of Win7 64, my main Win7 64 and XP 32.
    The most trouble free method of switching drives/OS installs.


    Forgot to add, using the boot menu method, it will always default to the boot drive selected in the CMOS on the next reboot (unless I press F12 again).
    So I keep my main Win7 64 install as boot in the CMOS and use the boot menu to load XP or my test Win7.
    Next reboot it will automatically load my main Win7 again without doing anything, neat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2012
  7. alanm

    alanm Ancient Guru

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    I use F12 myself, mainly for bootable CDs or USB flash drives. But as you said, F12 for booting multi-OS's depends on each OS installed on its own drive, something that doesnt apply for everyone. But point taken if you have each OS on separate drive.

    Nothing can stop me from booting into anything other than mechanical failure, lol. Bootable USBs with boot-managers can easily get you out such problems. :D

    p.s. I still think its a bit annoying to bring up the F12 menu and scroll thru the device list and the hard drive sub-menu to select your drive (which is listed by its hardware model/ID) to boot up. I would still rather have the main boot menu on one page (which automatically comes up) and select from there tbh.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2012

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