MSI OC team Breaches 10K MHz DDR5-10004

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Apr 27, 2022.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

    Messages:
    44,380
    Likes Received:
    11,242
    GPU:
    AMD | NVIDIA
  2. Kaarme

    Kaarme Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    2,981
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    GPU:
    Sapphire 390
    The latency is still better than in SSDs, so MSI must be happy.
     
  3. David3k

    David3k Member Guru

    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    34
    GPU:
    Graphics Processing Unit
    which is required for 10004 MT/s

    It's Mbps not MT/s.

    Only Micron uses MT/s, which is inaccurate because it doesn't actually do that many transfers per second. Each "Transfer" contains a number of bits, when you multiply the Transfers per second against the bits per transfer, you get the bitrate, which this the rated speed of the device. A DDR4 4000 kit does not do four thousand transfers per second, but it does have a bitrate of four thousand per second.

    Every other manufacturer on the face of the earth that makes data storage devices, volatile or non-volatile, uses Bitrate per second to indicate speed, not Transfers per second, for the aforementioned reasons above.

    I think Buildzoid did a good video on this, if a bit of a ramble:

    Edit: Apparently it's not even consistent within Micron itself since every other division uses Bitrate except Micron's DDR division.

    Edit2: Yes, this effectively means MSI reached 10 Gbps on DDR5
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2022
  4. Venix

    Venix Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    2,519
    Likes Received:
    1,237
    GPU:
    Palit 1060 6gb

  5. user1

    user1 Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    2,071
    Likes Received:
    812
    GPU:
    hd 6870
    MT refers to mega tranfer, as in million transfers, ddr memory performs 2 tranfers per cycle, known as double data rate, which is why the the MT/s is double to real clock speed of ddr memory,

    its not just used for memory either.
    on amd platforms the hypertransport bus speed was often given in MT/s

    the term is technically accurate.

    the math goes as follows
    ( tranfers per sec) x (bus width) / (8 bits per byte) = total bytes per sec

    example : 4000mt/s x 64bits (width of a memory stick) / 8 = 32000 MB/s (this number is also used as a speed rating for memory modules in the form of PC4-32000 )

    mbps is an equivalent term, but instead refers to the speed per data pin when talking about memory chips. resulting in the same math for determining the total data rate
    (bits per sec per pin) x (bus width) / 8 = total data rate per sec in bytes

    both terms are fine to use, but I will say that MT/s has fallen out of use in recent years by the industry.
     

Share This Page