MSI Afterburner v4.6.0 beta 10 (Pascal Support, Extended Sliders, more..)

Discussion in 'Videocards - NVIDIA GeForce' started by UZ7, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. UZ7

    UZ7 Ancient Guru

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    Download: https://www.guru3d.com/files-details/msi-afterburner-beta-download.html

    MSI Afterburner v4.6.0 beta 10

    Code:
    MSI Afterburner v4.6.0 beta 10
    
    · Added NVIDIA Turing GPU architecture support:
    
    o Added voltage control for reference design NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20x0 series graphics cards
    
    o Advanced GPU Boost control for NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20x0 series graphics cards. Extended voltage/frequency curve editor on GeForce RTX 20x0 family graphics cards allows you to tune additional piecewise power/frequency floor and temperature/frequency floor curves. Control points on those new curves allow you to control GPU Boost power and thermal throttling algorithms more precisely than traditional power limit and thermal limit sliders
    
    o Hardware abstraction layer has been revamped to provide support for multiple independent fans per GPU due to introducing dual fan design on reference design NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20x0 series graphics cards and due to introducing native dual fan control in NVAPI. Both fans of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20x0 can be monitored independently in hardware monitoring module now and can be controlled synchronically in manual mode
    
    o Added NVIDIA Scanner technology support
    
    · Added Monolithic Power Systems MP2884A and MP2888A voltage controllers support
    
    · Added core, memory, auxiliary PEXVDD and auxiliary 1V8 voltage control for custom design MSI RTX 2080Ti Lightning series graphics cards with MP2888A + MP2888A +uP1816 voltage regulators
    
    · Added VRM and VRM2 temperature monitoring for custom design MSI RTX 2080Ti Lightning series graphics cards
    · Improved hardware monitoring module:
    
    o Added thermal offset for CPU temperature monitoring on AMD Ryzen 7 2700X processors
    
    o Similar CPU temperatures are now cloned for all cores on AMD CPUs to provide more convenient and unified On-Screen Display layout between Intel and AMD CPUs
    
    o “Pagefile usage” graph in hardware monitoring module has been renamed to “Commit charge”
    
    o Added group operation notifier to the caption of active hardware monitoring graphs list in “Monitoring” tab in the application properties. The notifier is informing you that you can apply a setting to all or to multiple selected hardware monitoring graphs when you hold group operation key (i.e. <crap> or <Ctrl>) and hover mouse cursor over the setting that can be applied to multiple hardware monitoring graphs at once (e.g. “Show in On-Screen Display”)
    
    o Added “Select by group” and “Select by type” commands to context menu of active hardware monitoring graphs list in “Monitoring” tab in the application properties. New commands allow selecting the graphs of exactly the same type (e.g. CPU1-CPU8 usage graphs on eight core CPU) or the graphs with the same OSD/LCD group name (for example, GPU clock, GPU power, GPU usage and the rest graphs with “GPU” group name). Such commands allow you to show similar items (e.g. all CPU usages) in On-Screen Display with a single click or rename a group for all child graphs in the single pass
    
    o Multi group edit mode is automatically selected now for group name edit field when you enable "Override group name" option while holding <Ctrl> key. You may still manually toggle this mode with <Ctrl>+<M> hotkey anytime when editing the group name
    
    o On-Screen Display item type (i.e. text, graph or combination of both) is now displayed in “Properties” column of active hardware monitoring graphs list in “Monitoring” tab in the application properties
    
    o Added programmable hotkey for clearing monitoring history
    
    o Added “Apply” button to application properties window. Now you may iteratively customize monitoring module without closing the properties to see the result on each step. Please take a note that some properties (e.g. application language) cannot be applied until you completely close properties window by design of application
    
    Improved On-Screen Display layout editor:
    
    § System reserved variable slots 250-255 are now displayed as system variables in the layout editor
    
    § Added embedded graphs support. Embedded graphs can be displayed directly in the text in a separate column, it can be convenient for displaying per-core CPU usages
    
    § Added embedded graph width adjustment variable to the “Graph” property node
    
    § Added new “Graph placement” property node. You can use it to place each graph on top of text, on bottom or make it embedded in in text column
    
    § Added new variables to “Separators” property node. Now you may define independent separators for the graphs located on top of text part, for the text part and for the graphs located on bottom of text part.
    
    § Slightly altered interpretation of prolog and epilog separators. Please take a note that prolog separator is no longer automatically appended with new line symbol, so you must specify it manually when necessary and epilog separator is now displayed below the bottom group of graphs
    
    § The list of hardware monitoring items in “Add item(s)” dialog window is alphabetically sorted now
    
    § Added macroses for embedding any data from monitoring module into OSD text (e.g. prolog). You may use macroses to display anything available in the monitoring module, e.g. %CPU temperature%
    
    § Improved On-Screen Display hypertext formatting performance due to more optimal macro replace strategy
    
    § Revamped “modern web” layout. New layout is demonstrating new text formatting features including big custom framerate counter, custom embedded background and On-Screed Display header, custom benchmark and system time indicators and embedded CPU and GPU usage graphs
    
    § On-Screen Display layouts are saved in monitoring profiles now
    
    Improved HwInfo plugin:
    
    § Added UPS load, power, input voltage and charge level data sources to default plugin configuration
    · Improved voltage/frequency editor:
    
    o Voltage/frequency editor window is now available on AMD GPUs. On AMD platform it allows you to edit core frequencies and voltages independently per each P-State:
    
    § Similar to NVIDIA GPUs, you may either adjust each point frequency or voltage independently with both mouse and keyboard or hold <Shift> and drag single point to apply similar frequency or voltage offset to all P-states
    
    § Read only P-States are currently not tracked, which means that you can try to adjust the frequency and voltage for it but it will be ignored when applying the curve
    
    -States locking functionality is not implemented yet-
    
    o Slightly increased default voltage range for voltage/frequency curve. Now you may lock voltage to lower values if you’re using voltage/frequency editor to downvolt and reduce power consumption on your NVIDIA GPU. Power users may customize the range further, the voltage and frequency limits are fully adjustable via the configuration file
    
    o Now you may press <F5> key in the editor window to reread the curve from hardware. This feature can be useful when adjusting the curve in changing thermal environment
    
    o Voltage and frequency axes are dynamically scales now, so the captions do not overlap when window is too small
    
    · Improved hardware control shared memory interface. During the past years, external applications like MSI Remote Server were using this interface for tuning GPU hardware settings remotely from external applications. The improvements are intended to allow connecting external stress testing and automatic overclocking related applications to MSI Afterburner via this interface:
    
    o Now voltage/frequency curve on NVIDIA Pascal and newer NVIDIA GPU architectures is accessible via hardware control shared memory interface
    
    o New hardware control shared memory interface command allows MSI Afterburner to load hardware settings from external application without immediately applying new settings to GPU
    
    o Added notification message, allowing external applications to notify MSI Afterburner about new command written to hardware control shared memory. Without the notification, MSI Afterburner is executing external commands on each hardware polling iteration like before. Please refer to SDK and MACMSharedMemorySample source code to see notification message usage example
    
    o Added hardware identification info to GPU entries in hardware control shared memory. Hardware identification info allows external applications to reconcile own enumerated devices with logical GPUs enumerated by MSI Afterburner
    
    o Now hardware control shared memory is refreshed on delayed fan speed readback events
    
    · New bundled MSI Overclocking Scanner application in now included in MSI Afterburner distributive:
    
    o MSI Overclocking Scanner is currently supported on NVIDIA GTX 10x0 and NVIDIA RTX 20x0 series graphics cards under 64-bit operating systems only. On such systems you may activate the scanner with dedicated button from the main application window or directly from voltage/frequency curve editor window
    
    o MSI Overclocking Scanner is powered by NVIDIA Scanner technology, which is using proprietary algorithms to quickly and reliably test manually overclocked GPU stability or find the maximum stable GPU overclocking in automatic mode with a single click. The scanner is using embedded NVIDIA test load to stress GPU. The scanner provides you two functional modes:
    
    § In test mode MSI Overclocking Scanner is stress-testing your manual GPU overclocking settings during approximately 5 minutes. The result is returned as GPU stability confidence level (0% - unstable, 100% - stable)
    
    § In scan mode MSI Overclocking Scanner is stress-testing and slowly increasing clocks on voltage/frequency curve points and this way automatically detecting the maximum stable GPU overclocking. The result is returned as modified voltage/frequency curve and average GPU overclocking in MHz
    
    · Added framerate limiter compatibility settings group to “On-Screen Display” tab to the application properties. The settings include programmable hotkeys for globally disabling, enabling or toggling framerate limiting techniques of RivaTuner Statistics Server. The settings are intended to provide a way to dynamically enable or disable scanline sync technology based framarate limiting without altering application profiles, however you may use it to toggle traditional framerate limter as well
    
    · Fixed kernel mode hardware access interface fix for AMD Vega GPUs. HBM temperature, GPU power and GPU voltage are no longer returning bogus values when kernel mode hardware access interface is enabled on AMD Vega series graphics cards
    
    · Hardcoded voltage/frequency curve clock multiplier implementation has been replaced with heuristic multiplier detection in order to provide unified voltage/frequency curve control implementation for NVIDIA Pascal and newer NVIDIA GPU architectures
    · Improved realtime voltage/frequency curve editor GUI scaling. Now GUI is scaled property when adjusting skin scaling with open voltage/frequency curve editor window
    
    · Improved report window, fan curve editor window, monitoring window and voltage/frequency curve editor scaling for scaling ratios greater than 100%
    
    · Multilanguage user interface library is DPI aware now. Main window skinned interface is no longer being scaled by OS and no longer looks blurred by default when greater than 100% DPI is selected. Now main skinned window interface can be manually zoomed with skin scaling slider in “User interface” tab, and the properties are automatically scaled by OS according to selected DPI
    
    · Added new skin scaling mode for power users. New mode provides better scaling performance at the expense of some scaling image quality loss
    
    · Skin scaling implementation is now asynchronous, so increasing skin scaling ratio doesn’t increase GUI update time and doesn’t decrease GUI response time
    
    · Skin scaling slider range has been extended from 75%-150% to 75%-200%
    Nice Pascal support for OC Scanner for those lazy people :p

    Also those maxing out at +1000 RAM they extended the sliders! and voltage control, read the notes!
     
    Maddness likes this.
  2. reflex75

    reflex75 Member

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    Nice thank you very much for the best OC tool!
    Small suggestion for futur version: showing average and max value with OSD in addition to the curent value (CPU: current, average, max)
     
  3. Passus

    Passus Maha Guru

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    Default clocks are wrong for my 1060 on the vram .. shows as 3800mhz when it should be 4002mhz
     
  4. HeavyHemi

    HeavyHemi Ancient Guru

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    Well, this is a strange issue. When I initially started the program, the interface was tiny so increased scaling to match Windows 200% at 4K and the size is back normal. Previously 100% scaling was the correct size. Next, I can click on the Title bar and move the app around the the desktop, but if I click on a empty area of the desktop, the Title Bar becomes INACTIVE, in other words and cannot click and hold the title bar and move the app. I have to click a button on the interface to make the Title Bar active.....

    Never mind, I decided to leave the above there but to add, if you have an issue with a skin, tying changing skins then changing back or essentially reloading the skin. That worked. So the Title bar is fine after reloading the skin. The scaling at 200% is normal size at 4K. I'mm not sure if I read the notes correctly on whether 200% scaling at 4K would be normal sized instead of still magnified some percentage.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018

  5. Robbo9999

    Robbo9999 Maha Guru

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    So, one new feature of this is automated OC Scanner for Pascal cards, not just limited to Turing cards like it was before. I tested it this afternoon on my GTX 1070, I get higher overclocks just by using my own manual overclocking efforts. OC Scanner gives me +62Mhz on the core, but my manual highest stable overclock is +100Mhz. Interestingly they also have a "Test" feature in the OC Scanner where you can just test your manual overclock, by clicking the "Test" button - interestingly it says at stock clocks my card is "Test completed, confidence level is 90%", so it thinks it's not 100% certain that my card is stable even at stock clocks (which is not true). At my max manual overclock of +100Mhz it also says "confidence level 90%", but the most interesting part is that if I run +113Mhz through the test which I know to be unstable then this returns "confidence level 85%" - so to me it seems that for Pascal cards you might want to aim for a "confidence level 90%" when testing your overclocks using that application. Here's a screenshot of the test, and you can see it uses a hell of lot power through the GPU at times, blips lasting a few seconds of 250W on just a GTX 1070!
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    From the release notes:

    - Multilanguage user interface library is DPI aware now. Main window skinned interface is no longer being scaled by OS and no longer looks blurred by default when greater than 100% DPI is selected. Now main skinned window interface can be manually zoomed with skin scaling slider in “User interface” tab, and the properties are automatically scaled by OS according to selected DPI
     
    yasamoka likes this.
  7. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    Wrong. It is bas idea to compare _average_ overlocking returned after scanning (62MHz) to fixed +100Mhz which you manually applied before. Scanner creates _non_linear_ overclocked VF curve, so the offsets can be different for different V/F curve points. For example you may have +10MHz on one point and +114Mhz on another one with average result of 62MHz. That's why it is also bad idea to use average overclocking reported by scanner as manual overclocking offset for whole curve.


    It was documented a few times that NVIDIA thinks that it is too brave to declare that the system is 100% stable, so 90% is an absolute maximum you can see. Even on stock clocks. That's info directly from NV.
     
    Robbo9999 likes this.
  8. Robbo9999

    Robbo9999 Maha Guru

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    Now that last part is very cool info to hear from you - that 90% is the absolute maxium confidence level you can see, very pleased to hear that & it sheds a lot of light on it, thanks. I'm also impressed that it then detected my known unstable overclock of +113Mhz as 85% confidence level, so it did notice the distinction.

    The first part of your response, fair enough (I understand), but I did get a higher manual overclock than what the OC Scanner could deliver - the actual clocks during benchmarking were 50Mhz higher with my manual overclock and the benchmark scores were higher too. But, it's good that OC Scanner has been included for Pascal cards, it's a way for noobs to hit a button and get a sizeable overclock, just with Pascal (at least) you can get a higher stable overclock by going old school with a manual overclock - for those enthusiasts that like to take the time to overclock & test themselves manually.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018
  9. Angantyr

    Angantyr Master Guru

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    But didn't you kinda expect your own OC results to be better than the OC Scanner suggestion? I can't imagine any Auto Overclock tool that wouldn't be very conservative with the suggested settings.
     
  10. Robbo9999

    Robbo9999 Maha Guru

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    Well, yes, I did expect that, although one or two reviews of Hilberts of some Turing cards have shown higher benchmark scores from the OC Scanner overclock when compared to the manual overclock, but it was variable in his reviews, most showed higher results from manual OC though - made me curious to see what the OC Scanner could do for Pascal!
     
  11. waltc3

    waltc3 Maha Guru

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    When it comes to clocking, most GPU oems will err on the conservative side, without a doubt. The specter of mass warranty returns causes them to lose sleep, I'd imagine...;)

    OK, unlike my experience with beta 9, I'm having no problems so far with AB beta 10--which is nice!
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2018

  12. Robbo9999

    Robbo9999 Maha Guru

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    Yes, I imagine the first priority for an NVidia created OC Scanner is that any overclocks created by the tool would not cause instability.
     
  13. TurboMan

    TurboMan Member Guru

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    Well this OC Scanner did its "SCAN" and it clocked my card over 2000 mhz with a curve which was NOT stable in BF 5 DX12... And i knew it wasn't going to be stable since i have clocked the card on my own @ slightly less than 2000mhz ever since i got it on the release date of GTX 1080 ti. On top of that, after it did its auto clock i did a "TEST" and it showed 90% confidence. So in the end, i would stick with manual and then trial and error in games. :)
     
  14. MacAdder

    MacAdder New Member

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    I must be half blind as I can't find the link to download this file on any of the pages suggested. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  15. MacAdder

    MacAdder New Member

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    Scratch that, just found it!
     
  16. HeavyHemi

    HeavyHemi Ancient Guru

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    Well usually things just work for me. But all I get trying to start the scanner is

    19:51:57 Connected to MSI Afterburner control interface v2.3
    19:52:01 GPU1 : VEN_10DE&DEV_1B06&SUBSYS_63903842&REV_A1&BUS_1&DEV_0&FN_0
    19:52:01 Memory clock +0MHz
    19:52:01 Overvoltage 100%
    19:52:01 Power limit 120%
    19:52:01 Thermal limit 90 °C
    19:52:01 Fan speed 1 Auto
    19:52:01 Start scanning, please wait a few minutes
    19:52:01 Failed to start scanning!

    If I click the test button without closing the program, I get Runtime Error.

    If I just start the Scanner and hit the 'Test' button, I get
    19:54:13 Connected to MSI Afterburner control interface v2.3
    19:54:17 GPU1 : VEN_10DE&DEV_1B06&SUBSYS_63903842&REV_A1&BUS_1&DEV_0&FN_0
    19:54:17 Core clock +0MHz
    19:54:17 Failed to start testing!
     

  17. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    NV Scanner component is failing on your system. I'm afraid I cannot help with that, it is not my development.
     
  18. ultraex2003

    ultraex2003 Member Guru

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    work for me :)
    thanks for the nice tool !!
    palit 1060 6G

    [​IMG]
     
    Robbo9999 likes this.
  19. Unwinder

    Unwinder Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice.
    This screenshot perfectly demonstrates why average overclock reported by scanner can be used for estimating the result only and why it shouldn't be specified manually. Your GPU is able to take approximately 200MHz stable offset in lower voltages but it decreases to 100MHz on higher voltage range. So if you try to specify that average 160 manually, you'll get too low overclocking on low voltages but can get beyond the stability limits on higher voltages.
     
    ultraex2003 and Robbo9999 like this.
  20. Robbo9999

    Robbo9999 Maha Guru

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    Am I right in thinking that the main advantage of this variable overclock through each of the voltage points is that if you have a card that is often power limited (and perhaps also applying to temperature limited) then it could mean you could end up with an overclock that is higher performing than if you had just applied manual testing and a straight offset overclock? Because during power limited or temperature limited scenarios the card will drop to lower voltage points, and if the curve has detected higher overclock offsets at lower voltages (like in ultraex2003's post above) then this will end up in a higher clock at those lower voltages in comparison to a straight fixed offset overclock. Most desktop cards aren't often power or temperature limited during gaming though, so I suppose this effect I talk about is not particularly relevant, although I suppose it could be relevant to folks who decide to lower the TDP of their GPU for whatever reason. Thinking about it, I imagine this automated OC Scanner curve overclock would be more beneficial in laptops, they're more power & temperature limited.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2018
  21. HeavyHemi

    HeavyHemi Ancient Guru

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    Well, that is precisely why I did not post it in the Afterburner thread nor ask for your help specifically. But thanks any way.
    For others, the error message I see in event viewer is..

    Faulting application name: MSIOCScanner_x64.exe, version: 1.6.0.0, time stamp: 0x5c223ef4
    Faulting module name: MSVCR90.dll, version: 9.0.30729.9518, time stamp: 0x5b6909cf
    Exception code: 0x40000015
    Fault offset: 0x0000000000042686
    Faulting process id: 0xe78
    Faulting application start time: 0x01d49e60ade564e7
    Faulting application path: C:\Program Files (x86)\MSI Afterburner\Bundle\OCScanner\MSIOCScanner_x64.exe
    Faulting module path: C:\WINDOWS\WinSxS\amd64_microsoft.vc90.crt_1fc8b3b9a1e18e3b_9.0.30729.9518_none_08e07c8fa840efbe\MSVCR90.dll
    Report Id: 71cea28a-36ed-484f-98b6-05fb518aa209
    Faulting package full name:
    Faulting package-relative application ID:

    I'm going to do a DDU driver nuke and go from there.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2018

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