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Looking to upgrade to 8GB of RAM

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by LordAboveAll, May 24, 2009.

  1. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    Thing that I love to is to educate people with almost 7 years of hobby operating system research since I was really little.

    Snow Leopard will be the first full 64-bit operating system for the MacOS X. Through APIs, the 32-bit kernel can execute 64-bit software just like how Windows x64 can run 32-bit applications. This is most likely done with software workaround to force the processor to be in long mode even though the kernel is 32-bit (which is traditionally run on legacy mode).

    Not quite, MacOS X doesn't use a UNIX kernel at all. It uses a kernel developed by the University of Carnegie Mellon called Mach which is a microkernel kernel. Albeit, the kernel used in MacOS X is heavily modified to what is known as a hybrid kernel mixing the philosophies of monolithic and microkernels. This is true with Windows as well (as a hybrid kernel). Linux is an example of a monolithic kernel but with modules. Probably it's the interesting design of Mach is the reason Apple can run 64-bit applications on a 32-bit kernel. This is probably due to the microkernel side of the design.

    The only part that is UNIX 03 certified is the BSD userland that was infused with the Mach-based kernel space. You can run UNIX software on the operating system, but it's not UNIX in the traditional sense. This infusion makes up the opensource part of MacOS X called Darwin which is released under the Apple Public Software License (APSL). You can download the source code and look through what makes up the base of MacOS X. The kernel package is called XNU as that is the official name of the MacOS X/Darwin OS kernel.

    Like other 32-bit operating systems, UNIX or not, MacOS X can only give the kernel space and every other applications 4 GB to use. Funny thing is that all major operating systems in the world have their design roots in UNIX. The only "big" operating system I can think of that isn't is the IBM i5/OS (which large conglomerates love due to its amazing reliability ... more stable than most UNICES and anything Microsoft can come up with).

    deltatux
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2009
  2. PR-0927

    PR-0927 Ancient Guru

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    I've seen games use more than 3 GB of RAM as well. Plus, when people say "4 GB is enough," or previously, "2 GB is enough," I laugh. Obviously it is for the immediate time and perhaps a few months to a year, but after that, it won't be (for high-end enthusiast stuff). Technology changes too rapidly. Back in the late 80s/early 90s, my Dad's department in a college bought a $3000-5000 computer (I can't remember the exact price), which was cutting-edge and top-of-the-line. It had a 40 MB hard drive, and that was something people were jealous of. RAM was several megabytes.

    Also, we had a top-of-the-line computer we bought for our house in 2004. It had 1 GB of RAM, and that was pretty much the equivalent of buying 4 GB of RAM this last summer (about one year ago). So in four years, the "enough RAM" quantity for high-end gamers and enthusiasts quadrupled. I won't be surprised to see the full 24 GB being used up on the majority of the X58 motherboards soon.

    - PR-0927
     
  3. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    4 GB is still enough for most applications. Obviously there are people that require more memory. Which is why the market is quickly producing denser memory chips. However, the price for the larger size chips grows exponentially. Thus, it may simply be economically infeasible to get higher RAM just to "future-proof" yourself. Just get the RAM as you need it.

    deltatux
     

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