Kanadian terms!

Discussion in 'The Guru's Pub' started by maleficarus™, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. maleficarus™

    maleficarus™ Banned

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    Another thread made me post this in its own thread. Post terms from your country. I am from Toronto Canada so I will start:

    Eh?
    Prounounced like the "ay" in "say", and used to mean "isn't that right?" or "don't you agree?" Mostly found in Eastern Canada, particularly in Ontario and the Maritimes. Much less common in Western Canada.

    Loonie/toonie
    Canadian 1$ and 2$ coins. The loonie is named for the bird on it (the loon), the toonie (really two-nnie, for two dollars) to match the loonie.

    Pop
    General word for carbonated beverage. "Soft drink" is also understood but considered unusually formal. "Soda" in Canada means carbonated water, or an ice-cream soda.

    Runners
    Running shoes, sneakers.

    Mounties
    Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Canada's federal law enforcement agency, which also provides local law enforcement to some communities. They are called "mounties" because when the force was founded the officers were mounted on horseback. You can still see the red-coated Mounties on their horses in communities across Canada.

    Bachelor:
    A bachelor apartment; an apartment all in a single room, with a small bathroom attached, for example you might hear someone say, "They have a bachelor for rent". In Montreal, this is known as a one-and-a-half apartment (one room, and the bathroom counts as the "half"). Some Canadians, especially in Prince Edward Island, call a one-room apartment a loft.

    Parkade:
    A parking garage, especially in the West.

    Washroom
    The toilet, also called restroom.

    Chesterfield
    Sofa or couch. Less common with younger Canadians, but still occasionally used.

    Hydro
    Short for hydroelectric, it's a common synonym for electrical service, used primarily in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and British Columbia. These four Canadian provinces' electric companies incorporate the term "Hydro" in their names (BC Hydro, Hydro Quebec, etc.). You will often hear people say, "I need to pay my hydro bill" or, if renting an apartment, ask, "Is hydro included?"

    Tuque/toque
    pronounced too-k, it's a winter hat, usually knitted, occasionally with a pompom on the top.

    Double-double
    A cup of coffee with two creams and two sugars, most commonly associated with the Tim Hortons chain of coffee shops. By the same token, triple-triple.

    Poutine
    A snack (originally from Quebec) of french fries topped with cheese curds and hot gravy.

    Canuck
    A Canadian; often used by Canadians as a self-descriptor. Also the name of Vancouver's professional hockey team.

    Canadian bacon
    Also called "back bacon," this is what is called peameal bacon in the US. Thick slices (not skinny strips) of salted and smoked meat from the back and sides of a pig.

    Sugaring off
    A trip to a maple "sugar shack", which is where you can visit a maple forest and see the taps and buckets used to collect the sap from sugar maples in the spring. Also involves a big communal meal, usually of pea soup, Canadian bacon and baked beans--all covered in fresh maple syrup! Most common in Quebec where it is also known as "cabane a sucre."

    First Nations
    The term First Nations is often used in Canada to refer to the indigenous people of Canada--who are called American Indians or Native Americans in the United States. This term does not include the Métis and Inuit in all regions, however; the term Aboriginal peoples is preferred when all three groups are included.

    Give 'er
    A slang phrase that means to work hard. If someone is talking about how much work they have to do, you might hear someone else respond, "Just give 'er!"

    Metro
    The name for the subway system in Montreal.
     
  2. proFits

    proFits Ancient Guru

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    1 Poutine isnt a ''snack'' it's a meal and the greatest one on earth!
    2 Metro isn't really an expression, simply the word for it, also help not confuse it with the restaurant Subway
    3 Tuque also a french word for that winter hat

    Just though I'd point those out... we're Québecois not Quebecers :)
     
  3. maleficarus™

    maleficarus™ Banned

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    Just thought I'd point out the fact that Toronto still has a hockey team and the quebecers don't! :3eyes:

    *wink*
     
  4. proFits

    proFits Ancient Guru

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    .... You are wrong. :stewpid:
     

  5. Norvekh

    Norvekh Ancient Guru

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    Huh, I've always referred to it as Canadian bacon as well. In fact, I've never heard that other term used before. It's always Canadian bacon.

    A 'bachelor' here is an efficiency apartment or simply an efficiency.

    "Soda" is a hotly debated term here in the US. It's broken down into three primary choices depending on region. In this area, being the Midwest, it is known primarily as "pop." Elsewhere, it is "soda." Down south, and the term I personally use from having lived down south, is "coke." As in, "What kind of coke do you have?" Even going as nearby as Kentucky tends to switch over to that term, though it really dominates when closer to southern Tennessee.

    The US, being as diverse and large as we are (population wise and land wise) we have developed quite a few regional quirks I guess. Ohioans tend to be referred to, and self-refer, as "Buckeyes," after the state tree but especially the dominant university's football team of the same name.

    Other oddities are that Versailles, the town in Ohio, is called "Ver-sells." Reds almost always refers to the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. And most people still refer to the recently (well, within the last decade anyway) renamed "National Museum of the United States Air Force" by its old name, "The Air Force Museum," largely because the new name is just a mouthfull. "Wright-Patt" is used in common vernacular in reference to "Wright-Patterson Air Force Base" and when among people from the area it simply becomes "the base" or "Area A/B/C" depending on which area of the base is being referenced. It used to be 3 bases, hence A, B, and C and the hyphenated name.

    I can't really think of any more or less universal terms which would apply through all of the US. We're just so regionalized in our culture that it really boils down to the two coasts, Alaska, Hawaii, the midwest, southwest, and south(east) with a few other smaller regions thrown in, such as Brooklyn or Miami (the city in Florida, not to be confused with the Miami Valley which encompasses Dayton, Ohio and surrounding areas). For instance, in the midwest especially we have lots of different ways towns incorporate. So a town may be that, a city, a village, or a township. I might be forgetting a few as well, especially once you go to areas like Louisiana or Virginia which have completely different laws regarding how incorporation works.

    The US is divided into states, which then consist of counties* which then break down into the various administrative regions like towns and cities. Thus, that explains why we tend to have all sorts of ways of telling each other where we live, whether by region, state, county, or city.

    *Alaska and Louisiana do not have counties. Instead they have Boroughs (Alaska) and Parishes (Louisana).

    Other terms I know of are "panhandle" when referring to the panhandle shaped areas of states, like Oklahoma, Texas, and Florida. Another is "Lower Alabama" which is often used in reference to the Florida panhandle and can be used as a simple reference but I've also heard it used as an insult.

    Speaking of which, we Americans like to blame our neighbors for poor driving. For Ohio it's not uncommon to hear people use the term "Michigan drivers" in reference to people who speed or otherwise create roadway havoc and in Florida it was usually "Alabama drivers."

    Related, we have different roadways and common terms are 'highway' or 'freeway' in reference to either state highways, or the national Interstate system which is also used. When referencing an Interstate highway number, if it is a 3-digit bypass highway, we don't use formal numbering but instead will say something like "six seventy-five" for Interstate 675. Same goes for state highways with triple digits like Ohio 444 is "four forty-four."

    Prices I suppose can be confusing to non-native speakers as we never say "and cents" but instead would say the price $19.95 as "nineteen ninty-five." A used car selling for $1,995 would also be said the same way, so it's completely by context of the product itself as to whether the "ninty-five" in this case is in reference to dollars or cents.

    Gas prices are sometimes rounded up to the next cent due to the 9/10 cent on every gallon which is marked on the price. $2.299 for instance might be said to be $2.30 a gallon "two thirty." Though people also will round down oddly enough so it might also be called "two twenty-nine" a gallon. It's not standard so you really simply need to know the individual and how they speak to figure it out (my father for instance rounds down, while I round up except when talking to him).

    I'm sure there are a lot more examples I can give, but I figure I can do those later.
     
  6. metaltoiletry

    metaltoiletry Maha Guru

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    When I lived in Louisiana it was normal to say, "put up" when placing an object down or up or away.

    For example: I'm holding a plate. When someone wants me to put it away in the cabinet or where it belongs, one would say, "put that up".

    Another example: "Let me put this up first, then I can do that".
     
  7. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    Canadian bacon! I prefer:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ShadowMyth

    ShadowMyth Ancient Guru

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    LOL, these jokes are endless.......

    An Englishman, a Canadian and an American were captured by terrorists.

    The terrorist leader said, "Before we shoot you, you will be allowed last words. Please let me know what you wish to talk about."

    The Englishman replied, "I wish to speak of loyalty and service to the crown."

    The Canadian replied, "Since you are involved in a question of national purpose, national identity, and secession, I wish to talk about the history of constitutional process in Canada, special status, distinct society and uniqueness within diversity."

    The American replied, "Just shoot me before the Canadian starts talking.
     
  9. malky

    malky Master Guru

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    How aboot a large double double eh?
     
  10. anticitizen013

    anticitizen013 Ancient Guru

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    Last year sometime I was doing a military exercise in Fort Irwin to support the American forces that were to be deployed overseas, and as I was talking to some of them, they started laughing for seemingly no reason. I asked why, and they said that I said "aboot". I think it was because A) I have always mocked us Canadians by saying aboot online so I might have subconsciously said it in real life and B) have a bit of an accent anyways (dad is British).

    In any case, I laughed at it regardless because it was funny :D. Oh and it seems that you Americans really enunciate the U in about, so that could be another reason why it sounded different to them.

    Also Tim Hortons coffee kicks ass. I don't usually drink coffee but if I do it's always Timmies.

    EDIT: Oh and another army story (I swear my friends probably hate me for telling these all the damn time)... we were on a winter exercise earlier this year and the snow was very deep and it was pretty chilly (-15 Celsius IIRC). Lots of ruck marching + snowshoes + toboggans. Basically all we did was march somewhere, set up the tent and eat, tear it down, march somewhere else... and basically repeat that for 2 days. Pretty good way to practise it. Anyways, by the end of the weekend everyone was completely bagged and really tired and I pull out a can of Tactical Bacon and we fire it up on our grills. I swear morale in our 5-man tent soared through the clouds. It was freakin' awesome. Especially when we woke up the next morning and made more. Our whole tent smelled of bacon. A couple of dudes that walked by our tent were incredibly jealous. Suckers. Bacon rules.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010

  11. thecake90

    thecake90 Ancient Guru

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    Canada? You mean American's little cousin :)
     
  12. proFits

    proFits Ancient Guru

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    America's hat/gay cousin/attic, etc
     
  13. anticitizen013

    anticitizen013 Ancient Guru

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  14. hawkeyefan

    hawkeyefan Maha Guru

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  15. ScoobyDooby

    ScoobyDooby Ancient Guru

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    I wouldn't call the Maple Leafs much of a hockey team! :wanker:

    ZING!

    lol and yes Poutine is probably one of the best things about Canada.
    Bud is the best thing about BC, and that says a lot since BC is easily the most beautiful province all around in Canada. Just my opinion of course, but my bias is great :p

    I will admit it here and now that I am a rabid Timmies consumer. I love my two cream three suger and sesame seed bagel toasted with cream cheese *droools*
     

  16. Pill Monster

    Pill Monster Banned

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    Canadians have a raised inflection at the end of a sentence when speaking.
     
  17. Tranceholic

    Tranceholic Banned

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    604 resident/immigrant

    1) vancouver is known overpopulated asian immigrants (thanks to railway) and criminals oversea - traid/asian gangs.
    2) vancouver is also known for overpopulated immigrants and reside in certain communities/areas.
    3) living in vancouver is expensive plus now that we have HST
    4) living in vancouver is better off taking public bus or skytrain or even biking
    5) non handless cellphone while driving will have a piggy pull you over
    6) there are plenty of nice drivers who will let you pass if you use light signal
    7) also there are plenty of bad drivers who is poor at paying attention to the road or butthole drivers in a rush
    8) BC BUD 'nuff said
    9) smoking weed is like smoking cigarettes in vancouver. many people are closet potheads until someone in a group got weed
    10) Tim Horton, Church's chicken, Pho and many ethic flavors. MMM~
    11) Governement's Liquor Store in Vancouver closes early (6pm) while some private store closes later no past midnight
    12) Clubs' liquor lastcall at 2~3am
    13) do NOT walk alone in Hasting st after midnight
    14) there are many homeless people in downtown vancouver
    15) HOCKEY IS THE BEST SPORT EVER! next to curling :yawn:
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  18. Skyline1010

    Skyline1010 Master Guru

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    Currently staying at home, within 20 miles of the US/Canada border. I can comment that Canadians who come down here to shop etc. do (mostly) fulfill the stereotype of saying 'aboot' and 'eh' nearly constantly.

    But about (see what I did there?) some US terms? Hmm.

    You could get into the whole pop/soda debate- as said earlier, it's both regional and hotly debated. I personally use soda, which might be because I'm originally from Massachusetts.

    It's almost 4AM, but I'll close my post by saying that [actual] Buffalo chicken wings are the greatest. ANYwhere else in the world with 'Buffalo wings' on the menu shouldn't be allowed to use the name.
     
  19. IcE

    IcE Don Snow Staff Member

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    I'm familiar with almost all of those Canadian phrases since I'm originally from Ontario.
     
  20. ScoobyDooby

    ScoobyDooby Ancient Guru

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    whats funny is that being someone who hails from Canada, the terms mentioned are ones I'm quite familiar with and so its almost like I just figure that everyone uses them. This got me into a bit of trouble on my recent trip to Europe and I'm sure at times Americans will not understand what I'm saying with certain words.
    Its nowhere near as bad as with the English though.. I was amazed at how I would be speaking Canadian English, and the UK English had trouble understanding me.. and not just because of the accent, but also because of the words and in particular the "slang".
     

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