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Is this an acceptable build?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by flexinho, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    GPU:
    KFA2 RTX 2060 S 8GB
    I just ordered a new PC and just wanted to know how you find this build and if you would change anything?
    • Case: be quiet! Pure Base 600 black with Tempered Glass (ATX) - 2 pre-installed Pure Wings 2 fans (front: 140 mm; back: 120 mm)
    • CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-8700 6x 3.2 GHz (4,3 Ghz All-Core-Turbo)
    • CPU-Cooler: be quiet! Pure Rock (150 W)
    • RAM: 16 GB DDR4 Corsair Vengeance LPX black DIMM Kit 3000 MHz (2x 8 GB)
    • GPU: KFA2 NVIDIA® GeForce® RTX™ 2060 SUPER EX (8 GB GDDR6 VRAM)
    • Mainboard: ASUS TUF Z390-PLUS GAMING WIFI (Chipset: Z390 / ATX)
    • HDD: SATA III WD Blue WD10EZE (1 TB)
    • M.2 NVMe SSD: PCIe x4 Intel 660p (512 GB QLC)
    • PSU: 600 Watt be quiet! System Power B9 80+ Bronze
    • Sound: Onboard Sound
    • Monitor: Acer Predator XB241H (1080p, 144 Hz, G-Sync) - i already had this one before i ordered the new PC
    I bought it from the site www.one.de and they are currently building this PC for me, because it is a custom configured one.

    Is this a solid build for the future and how will the temps be?

    I am just a little bit worried because of the i7 8700 temps and the M.2 QLC drive. I heard that QLC isn't the most future proof drive to get...

    Thanks for all your feedback in advance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2019
  2. sverek

    sverek Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
    NOVIDIA -0.5GB
    I am not sure about GPU. AMD 5700XT costs about the same as RTX2600 Super, yet provide more performance.

    If you not getting highest end GPU and planning to play on highest video settings, chances are your CPU gonna idle.
    I'd rather consider AMD Ryzen 3600 over 8700. And the 8700 you getting is "NOT K" version, which you might not be able to overclock,
    which means you waste potential by going for Intel.

    Motherboard is overkill.

    SSD should be fine, actually.

    So yeah, there limitations with overclocking by going pre-build PC. Pre-build AMD PC would make more sense, since they deliver as much power as they can, without further manual overclocking.

    If you don't want to mess with your PC and overclock it, it's fine and acceptable build.
    It's not acceptable for me though, since i know for sure I gonna start overclocking once CPU is not getting me enough performance.
     
    flexinho likes this.
  3. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    GPU:
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    @sverek

    Thank you for you're feedback.

    I forgot to mention that i have a 144 hz - 1080p - G-Sync monitor (Acer Predator XB241H). So i need a CPU that can handle high fps in games like AC: Odyssey, The Witcher III and so on.

    I had the same thought as you with the GPU. First i wanted the 5700 XT but then it was more expensive on the site where i bought the PC. It was just a few bucks so i just picked the NVIDIA one. I don't know why but i always used NVIDIA GPU's so it was more a subjective decision.

    I have no interest in overclocking the CPU, because 4,3 Ghz are enough for me. The temps are more important to me because i read in other forums that the i7 8700 will get very hot and many people would undervolt it.
    I thought about getting the 9700 but i see this CPU as a downgrade because of the fewer threads (8 instead of 12) and it would possibly get even hotter as i heard.

    I chose this mainboard just because it was the cheapest one with integrated WIFI (on the site where i bought it) and not that expensive. So it was more a deal.
    The good thing with this mainboard for me is that i can use 3000 Mhz RAM with it and overclock the RAM more if i wish.

    If the day comes and i want to start overcloking the CPU, i would just buy an i9 9900K because the mainboard is ready for it. Don't know if the 1151 chipset will be compatible with the 10th gen Intel CPU's though...


    Question to everyone: What are you're experiences with QLC SSD's? I know that they have a shorter lifespan than TLC, MLC and SLC ones but will this affect me as a normal gamer? I don't use it for rendering videos or stuff like that. I will just install games on it and delete. I really don't want that it breaks after a year or so because it will be my boot drive as well...
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2019
  4. d_mouse

    d_mouse Maha Guru

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    GPU:
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    I wouldn't worry too much about the CPU temps at all as with the cooler you've selected they should be perfectly fine.

    As the others have said though, I'd look at the 8700K even if you're not going to overclock now as it's base clocks are higher at 3.7Ghz and if you are wanting to overclock later down the track you'll be saving yourself a good chunk of money by not having to upgrade your CPU to get a K SKU later on.
     
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  5. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    GPU:
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    @d_mouse

    Thanks man! I hope you are right with the temps.

    But does those stock clocks really mean something? The CPU's nowadays always use boost mode. The i7 8700 has a stock clock of 3,2 Ghz but in gaming it always runs with 4,3 Ghz. The i7 8700K runs with 4,6 Ghz (or 4,7 Ghz???) in gaming and 3,7 Ghz stock. So how important are those stock clocks? It seems like they are getting more and more unimportant.

    When the point comes and i want to upgrade the CPU, the only reason will be: more Cores/Threads!
    So the i9 9900K will be the only CPU that i would consider upgrading to. But this CPU is too expensive right now and i don't know if the 10th gen Intel CPU's will still use the 1151 socket (i don't expect it...).
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2019
  6. d_mouse

    d_mouse Maha Guru

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    Yeah I'd expect a new socket for the next gen intel chips.

    From what I understand the CPU will run stock speed until there's enough of a load to warrant the boost. I'm not certain on this though as when I had my last Intel chip (7600k) I had a 4.7 all core overclock and didn't bother checking how it performed stock.
     
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  7. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    GPU:
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    The PC came yesterday and it is a beautiful and fast build.

    But the CPU clocks seem to be much more variable now. Asus MultiCore Enhancement is disabled in the BIOS. This could be the reason but i am not sure.

    All in all games run like butter now and the PC is quiet and cool.

    CPU: 65-80°C max
    GPU: 60-65°C max

    I just tested it in Assassin's Creed: Origins because this will be the worst case scenario for my CPU. It never dips under 60 fps on Ultra High settings.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
  8. d_mouse

    d_mouse Maha Guru

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    Nice, enjoy it man.
     
    flexinho likes this.
  9. anticupidon

    anticupidon Ancient Guru

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    New computer, so nice. The joy of starting new built machine.
    It's summer, maybe the temperatures will dip in autumn.
     
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  10. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    Thank you guys! :)

    I started replaying Assassin's Creed: Origins with Ultra High settings with locked 60 fps.

    The PC is very quiet and the temps are fine for the hot weather right now. The GPU rarely reaches 60°C. The CPU peaks at 85°C but is more often at around 70°C. This game is really CPU heavy... :rolleyes:

    However one thing is strange. The CPU doesn't always run with 4,2 or 4,3 Ghz (All-Core-Turbo). Often the clock speed drops to at least 3,1 Ghz. Asus Multi Core Enhancement is diabled in the BIOS because the guys who build the PC seemed to have changed some stuff in the BIOS and i am not familiar with all those settings. There is also an XML II profile for the RAM enabled. :confused:
     

  11. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    The boost clock is entirely dependent on power, temperature and thread execution. It will "boost" as much as possible (within the set values) while staying within TDP. The theory is: Faster clocks = shorter execution time = less power consumed over time. Less core load, power, heat = faster clocks....more core load, power, heat = lower clocks.
     
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  12. anticupidon

    anticupidon Ancient Guru

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    Wouldn't that be Intel's SpeedStep kicking in?
    Look it up in your BIOS settings.
     
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  13. flexinho

    flexinho Member Guru

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    I learned how the Asus BIOS works for hours now and fixed the problem. :)
    Now the CPU runs at locked 4,3 Ghz in games and the little microstutters from time to time (because of the CPU thottling) is gone. All the power management stuff (SpeedStep, SpeedShift, C-States and so on) is still turned on or on auto.
    I just changed some values in the package power limit which lets the CPU go over it's TDP of 65 watts before throttling. I put it on 120 watts and 140 watts max because my CPU cooler is just for 150 watts. :eek:

    After all these changes the CPU started to go over 85°C. Then i undervolted the CPU with an offset of 70 mV (now the Vcore is at 1.19 volts) and currently the CPU stays under 80°C with the fps locked at a stable 60. ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019

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