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GeForce 417.71 Game Ready Driver - Download & Discussion

Discussion in 'Videocards - NVIDIA GeForce Drivers Section' started by Keno34, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. Memorian

    Memorian Ancient Guru

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    Did you read the article ?

    ''Thankfully, though, Capcom’s latest title can run with constant 60fps on a variety of GPUs on Max settings. In 1080p, our AMD Radeon RX 580, Vega 64, NVIDIA GTX980Ti and RTX2080Ti were able to run the game with more than 60fps.''
     
  2. Djavulen

    Djavulen Member

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    I went after your statement, not the article. And while indeed most systems will be able to handle 60fps, it's a shame that's the target. I tried the demo and compared to Resident Evil 7 it runs a lot worse. So a driver is very welcome to try making it run at even higher framerates.
     
  3. XenthorX

    XenthorX Ancient Guru

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    i keep having Chrome crashes with those driver on 2080-Ti
     
  4. EdKiefer

    EdKiefer Ancient Guru

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    I hope so but that is on 2080ti, that 980 probably not so much.
     

  5. Duncan Scholtz

    Duncan Scholtz New Member

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    Any luck with this, mine is still bad :I
     
  6. Yuzuha

    Yuzuha New Member

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    The reason why i switch so much was to show proof of how i know when gsync is actually working and the 3 bug that prevent gsync from working. Been watching all these youtube video of people testing it but their doing it all wrong. They would turn it on, then get screen tearing. Then they would tell you to turn on vsync / use frame limiter. If you watch the video all to the end i listed the 3 bug. Nvidia driver 417.71 gsync/freesync just doesnt' work in fullscreen. If it working properly, then the fps should auto cap to your monitor max refresh rate even with vsync off and no fps limiter. I got mines to work right and i'm not getting any tearing at all. Everything is buttery smooth.

    Not sure why my video got deleted. Was only trying to show people how they know when gsync is working properly and how to set it up the right way. If you need the video link again send me a private message or something.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  7. AATT

    AATT Member Guru

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    same
    the only use case here would be a shooter singleplayer eye-candy like experience where the gpu cant get to just as high of a fps above the refresh rate where i start to dont notice the tearing that much* (which is not high like 66 fps for 60 hz), i do not have such a case right now

    *ps
    or cant maintain constant 60 fps, for that matter
     
  8. jorimt

    jorimt Member

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    I saw your video before it was removed.

    Borderless + G-SYNC + in-game V-SYNC off is, in this instance, effectively the same thing as (exclusive) Fullscreen + G-SYNC + V-SYNC on (either in-game or NVCP).

    The Windows OS's DWM (Desktop Window Manager) forces it's own form of triple buffer V-SYNC in borderless/windowed mode at default, and in the majority of cases, in-game V-SYNC settings do not apply to borderless mode, so even though V-SYNC is off in-game, it's still on in borderless mode.

    Try this: apply G-SYNC fullscreen mode, set the game to fullscreen, and enable in-game V-SYNC, and you'll get a 75 FPS lock as well.

    In either scenario, without an appropriate in-game or external FPS limit below the refresh rate, you are currently getting plain old V-SYNC behavior at that framerate.

    G-SYNC mode getting stuck when you check or uncheck the box while in-game might end up being a bug (though I don't think it was originally intended for users to do this while in-game as is), but the lack of an "auto cap" behavior with G-SYNC is not. It never existed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
  9. Yuzuha

    Yuzuha New Member

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    I know about window DWM. I forced that off before i did those test. They added auto cap to gsync/ freesync technology a while back. Most people just didn't realized or read up about it.
    Also if you read up the faq on nvidia site. Gsync suppose to eliminate tearing. If you turn on gsync and it still tearing then you suppose to turn on vsync to get rid of tearing then what the point of gsync? Doesn't that already tell you that gsync isn't working if your game is tearing with it on? Just read the faq on nvidia and amd faq about the 2 technology.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
  10. jorimt

    jorimt Member

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    When you "disabled" DWM, did you see tearing in borderless without G-SYNC enabled? If not, DWM isn't disabled.

    You do understand that VRR (variable refresh rate) technology (G-SYNC, FreeSync, adaptive sync) works by adjusting the refresh rate to the framerate, right?

    And that G-SYNC in exclusive fullscreen mode with V-SYNC disabled means that as soon as the framerate exceeds your refresh rate (I believe 75Hz in your case, so 75+ FPS), that G-SYNC disables (as it can no longer adjust the refresh rate to the framerate), and you then get plain old V-SYNC off behavior (tearing) then, right?

    The "auto-cap" you are seeing with borderless and G-SYNC is plain old (double buffer) V-SYNC behavior, just like if you were to use exclusive fullscreen with G-SYNC and V-SYNC enabled.

    By the way, as long as the framerate exceeds the refresh rate, standalone double buffer V-SYNC (without G-SYNC) has virtually perfect frame pacing (it looks smooth), and effectively "auto-caps" the framerate to your max refresh rate.

    The only problem is, double buffer V-SYNC adds lots of input lag with framerates above the refresh rate, and when the framerate drops below the refresh rate, double buffer V-SYNC causes recurring stutter due to repeat frames from mismatched GPU/display synchronization.

    G-SYNC retains this virtually perfect frame pacing (smoothness), while fixing both the input lag and stutter issue below the refresh rate (within it's range), and at any framerate within the refresh rate (so long as your monitor properly supports LFC: low framerate compensation; this functionality is currently spotty and/or limited with "G-SYNC Compatible" FreeSync monitors when compared to genuine G-SYNC monitors containing a hardware module, though).

    In other words, not everyone can tell the difference between properly functioning G-SYNC and standalone double buffer V-SYNC, especially if they aren't sensitive to input lag.

    Anyway, that was my last shot.

    If you reply with another "no, just read up on it, I'm right," I won't bother answering again; believe what you will.
     
    AsiJu and Chastity like this.

  11. lucidus

    lucidus Ancient Guru

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    Does your window turn black? I've had black screens in the browser as if the gpu process has crashed.
     
    XenthorX likes this.
  12. CPC_RedDawn

    CPC_RedDawn Ancient Guru

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  13. XenthorX

    XenthorX Ancient Guru

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    Exactly, and i do think the gpu is crashing, had troubles with Unreal Engine too
     
  14. Danny_G13

    Danny_G13 Master Guru

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    Ok so I only actually learned about freesync being available on Geforce cards like today, and having tested it on my freesync monitor and 1080Ti I am struggling to see how/if it actually works.

    My monitor is quite old now, a Sammie 4K U24E590 budget model, and it goes to 60Hz and that's it. Does adaptive sync not work below that? Because it doesn't seem to be working in the slightest for me?

    What am I missing here.

    Cheers.
     
  15. nevcairiel

    nevcairiel Master Guru

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    The Freesync implementation on those old Samsung monitors is pretty terrible. Even if you manage to turn it on, it won't be pretty. Their refresh range is incredibly narrow, and littered with bugs.
     

  16. Chastity

    Chastity Maha Guru

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    That's rather uninformed reply in regards to how pretty it will be. The range by default is 40-60 Hz, and with CRU you can extend the lower range. No LFR support, but I use 32-60, and works very well, and the gameplay is fluid.
     
  17. Keesberenburg

    Keesberenburg Master Guru

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    After some windows netfamework updates yesterday or today i can't livestream 1440p or custom 1440p to YouTube, after a few seconds shadowplay stop recording and the video is a blacksteen at YouTube.
    Some one els got this problem. I can't vind GFE topic also for this question?
     
  18. Anarion

    Anarion Ancient Guru

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    You mean triple buffered vsync. Also the vsync in borderless mode is rather interesting... Assuming that one doesn't select ingame vsync, there's not going to be any tearing but it will not cap the framerate. However, frame pacing is what it is though. Nice thing is that borderless mode will force triple buffering if game uses double buffered vsync.

    Double buffered vsync actually wouldn't cause stutter. It will cause major performance drop if the framerate can't keep up with the refresh rate. For example if the screen is 60 Hz and card could only do 55 fps, the fps would drop down to 30 fps. It's "smooth" but...
     
  19. jorimt

    jorimt Member

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    No, I meant double buffer.

    While I can't claim "G-SYNC on FreeSync" behaves exactly the same as G-SYNC w/module yet, G-SYNC functions on a double buffer, and as far as I am aware, G-SYNC overrides the triple buffer mode in borderless with double buffer, which is why he is seeing that "auto-cap" behavior.

    That's because it's a "true" form of triple buffer.

    Instead of just having a third buffer to solely prevent the half refresh lock (e.g. 60 to 30 and back) with FPS inside the refresh rate using standalone double buffer V-SYNC (which is effectively what "faked" triple buffer methods do), the Windows DWM's borderless triple buffer solution is more akin to Nvidia Fast Sync, which is why it behaves as it does with FPS above the refresh rate.

    Fully aware of what you're saying, but double buffer V-SYNC doesn't actually directly "cause" performance drops, the system does. Double buffer V-SYNC merely "reacts."

    Unlike G-SYNC, double buffer V-SYNC has to time frame delivery to a fixed refresh rate, and if it misses a single one of these delivery windows (aka when the average framerate is below 60 FPS @60Hz, for instance), it has to repeat each frame once until the system can sustain a framerate above the refresh rate again (thus locking the framerate to half refresh: 30 FPS @60Hz, 60 FPS @120 Hz, 72 FPS @144Hz, etc).

    This next frame > next frame > repeat previous frame > next frame with double buffer V-SYNC and a framerate that periodically drops/rises above the refresh rate can certainly be described as "stutter," which is typically defined as a perceivable break in an otherwise continuous pattern.
     
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  20. MrBonk

    MrBonk Ancient Guru

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    You wouldn't want to run the game on max settings anyway. You can claw back a lot of performance in RE2R by changing some stuff that makes a barely noticeable difference or in the case of Reflections it looks like hot garbage and wastes a ton of performance for no visual gain (Other than on pools of water). SSAO eats up quite a bit of performance and most of the AO in this game using HDAO or HBAO+ is pretty subtle, with the vingetting and the constant eye adaptation changes you could get away with turning it down to Variable SSAO or off completely and not see a huge visual difference.

    Shadow Resolution, Shadow Cache,Volumetric Lighting, Screen Space Reflections, SSAO, Motion Blur and DoF are all worth tweaking if you want to get some performance back and it doesn't harm the core visual look of the game.

    Once I finish playing through the game on my 2080 (Which has a lot of stuttering here and there as the game tries to cache whatever the hell is going on in the background. Often opening up the map and going back out causes a stutter). I'll pop my 980 back in before I build my 2600x system and test that.

    I'm willing to bet like with RE7 you can get 1620p with 60FPS the majority of the time just by tweaking some settings. And even if you can't, the game is perfectly playable at 30FPS if consistency is more important to you.
     

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