Flash Diffusers

Discussion in 'Digital Photography, Home and Portable Electronics' started by bLinkZor, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. bLinkZor

    bLinkZor Maha Guru

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    I know anyone that has an external flash has to have a diffuser, I just got mines and seen some of my friends have some sort of their home made flash diffuser or an index card on their external flash. I've been searching online for a good one, and majority of them have the Gary Fong LightSphere. I will be shooting nightlife at parties and clubs, and I was really impressed with pictures using a diffuser. My setup is a Canon 60D with a 430EX2 and a 18 -135mm.
     
  2. Tranceholic

    Tranceholic Banned

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  3. NoviceRei

    NoviceRei Ancient Guru

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    no need for the expensive types.
     
  4. eclap

    eclap Banned

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    I try to stay away from using flash altogether. have a lumiquest soft box and I use it if I must (meaning when the light is really bad and I'm paid to shoot) but for normal use I stay away from it. I would rather wait for good light

    EDIT: this is the softbox I use, it actually does a good job, but you can't beat good light. http://store.lumiquest.com/lumiquest-softbox/
     

  5. chiefmasterjedi

    chiefmasterjedi Master Guru

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    For events you may as well use direct flash or the bounce card and save your money. The lumiquest is great for macro because the size of the light in relation to your subject is very large whereas the size of the light in relation to a human subject is very small and at 10'+ there isn't enough of a difference between the size of bare flash and a lumiquest or Gary Fong. Bare flash is more specular but that's about the only difference. The Gary Fong does however get the light higher which in turn makes the shadows behind your subjects lower and out of the shot, which is good.
    A big light source equals a soft light and a small light source equals hard light. Bouncing the light off a ceiling or wall will turn your small flash into a large light source but that's not always available at events. Also, all of these modifiers rob you of flash power and battery life which can be a big issue at long events. The ideal situation is when there is some ambient light even if it's very dim, then you can slow the shutter and let some of that ambient in and fill with the flash. This works well at weddings when the bride has the first dance because you can capture a slight blur of movement but still freeze the face with the flash, this is where rear or second curtain sync comes in useful.

    Best advice is to practice with your flash and don't get too caught up in all the hype of "small" modifiers. An example of this is Eclap's link above, the Lumiquest site has two photos displayed, one with their product on the flash and one without. Look carefully at both photos, they are exposed differently, one is lighter than the other. This is not caused by flash modifiers and is an over exaggerated comparison or good marketing, depends on how you look at it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2012

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