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Fixed vs Variable CPU ratio - BIOS Eco options etc...

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by XenthorX, Sep 23, 2018.

  1. XenthorX

    XenthorX Ancient Guru

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    Using a X99 - 5820k since 2015 , it's been running at 4.5Ghz almost since day one.

    While i remember turning a couple eco options off, my CPU still fluctuate between a couple ratio: x45 and x12

    Now that i'm looking for ways to get every bit of computing power from my CPU, i'm wondering if there's a way to fix it at x45 and if it makes any sense in the first place.

    Any feedback on variable framerate and optimization ?
     
  2. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    GPU:
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    Go to power plan advanced settings dialog (in Windows not in BIOS) and set "Minimum processor state" as 100%. Also there are hidden settings for boost: "Processor performance boost policy", "Processor performance boost mode".

    You can use my tool to unhide them or edit right there https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/windows-power-plan-settings-explorer-utility.416058/

    As for BIOS, you can toy with "Enhanced Intel SpeedStep" and "Intel Turbo Boost" settings.
     
    XenthorX likes this.
  3. XenthorX

    XenthorX Ancient Guru

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    Just checked, looks like i'm already at 100% on minimum in advanced power option. I'll have a second look into BIOS see if there's any option left !
     
  4. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    May be your power plan is broken. Or not applied somehow. I monitored that "Minimum processor state" on many rigs and everywhere it disabled P-states when set to "100%".

    PS Or may be you cranked up ratio too high and CPU throttles back to x12 to protect from overheat and/or "overcurrent". This you can test by lowering ratio step by step and monitoring.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2018

  5. jura11

    jura11 Ancient Guru

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    Hi there

    If you want to run yours CPU at max frequency or yours desirable OC 4.5Ghz then I would suggest disable Intel EIST if its enabled, if still is downclocking during the idle then I would check C states bit tbis shouldn't make any difference

    But be aware idle temperatures would be higher if CPU will be running at max clocks, if you have ASRock X99 board then you should check BIOS HW monitoring where idle temperatures are always higher than in Windows, as in BIOS on ASRock boards CPU is running at max speed or clocks without enabled power saving features due this temperatures are higher in BIOS

    @mbk1969

    Not sure but this power plan never worked for me as well, clocks always fluctuate like in OP question and only way in my case how to run my OC at max speed or frequency has been disable EIST

    Not sure if you are really need to do that to disable EIST and run CPU at max frequency, you will not gain anything only yours power consumption will be higher

    If SW is coded right to allow to use all cores or threads then will be using them, that's for sure

    Hope this helps

    Thanks, Jura
     
  6. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    I have seen such ignoring of power plan CPU settings only on AMD rig (notebook with AMD APU) where (I suspect) AMD Overdrive (as a part of APU drivers bundle) took control over CPU.

    On SkyLake and newer CPUs new mode of controlling the P-states was introduced - so called autonomous. And Win10 introduced corresponding new settings for this autonomous mode.
    https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/s...er-settings-in-win10-for-skylake-cpus.409110/

    Processor Power Management has many components:
    [​IMG]
    System Firmware (BIOS)
    The system firmware is responsible for including the ACPI BIOS tables that contain the ACPI processor objects that describe the system's PPM capabilities and controls. The ACPI BIOS tables can also contain optional ACPI processor objects that describe multiprocessor domain dependencies or support for cooperative performance state management (PCC). The system firmware can dynamically update the PPM capabilities based on certain system events, such as AC/DC power source transitions.

    Details about the required and optional ACPI processor objects for Windows 7 are provided in the “Implementing Processor Power Management for Windows 7” section later in this paper.

    Windows Kernel Power Manager
    The Windows kernel power manager is responsible for:

    · Managing and applying processor power policy.
    · Calculating the required processor power state transitions.
    · Applying any constraints due to thermal conditions.


    Processor power policy is owned and managed by the Windows kernel power manager. The power manager is responsible for choosing the correct processor state (the “target” state) based on CPU usage and other factors, depending on the PPM technology that is involved. The power manager then directs the appropriate processor state transition through a direct-call interface to the processor driver. The processor driver is responsible for invoking the actual state transition mechanism on the processor or other platform hardware as required.

    Processor Drivers
    Processor drivers in Windows are used to abstract the specific differences of processor designs from various processor vendors from the operating system. For example, processor drivers might contain processor-specific routines to determine the presence of PPM capabilities and might use a model-specific register (MSR) to invoke PPM state transitions directly on a processor.

    Processor drivers in Windows are responsible for:

    · Enumerating the PPM capabilities of the system.
    · Validating that the PPM capabilities are described correctly and that they are present in system hardware.
    · Passing the supported PPM capabilities to the kernel power manager.
    · Invoking processor power state transitions on the appropriate hardware as directed by the kernel power manager.

    Loading the Correct Processor Driver
    Processor objects are described in the ACPI namespace and are enumerated by the Windows ACPI interpreter. Windows uses the information that is obtained from the CPUID instruction to generate the correct hardware device ID during processor enumeration. This enables the system to load the correct processor driver for the processors that are installed in the system. If a specific match is not found, the generic processor driver, Processr.sys, is used. The specific processors that Windows supports can be seen by examining the Cpu.inf file that is located in the %SYSTEMDRIVE%\Windows\Inf directory of a Windows installation.

    So something can be wrong with any of mentioned components. Also, using legacy OS with newest CPUs (unknown to OS) leads to fall back to generic driver.

    Btw, you can check Event log for P-states and C-states features errors:
    The kernel power manager also logs error events if any ACPI processor objects fail validation checks during processor driver initialization that cause any PPM capabilities to be disabled.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2018
  7. jura11

    jura11 Ancient Guru

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    Hi @mbk1969

    I will check that later this week,

    If this feature is available for Skylake CPU and newer CPU then I think this will not applies for us with X99 and Haswell-E CPU maybe this applies for Broadwell CPU which has been released bit later than Haswell-E

    But for sure I don't have any Kernel Processor Power errors in Event Viewer but I can check

    I always check my Event Viewer because habe few issues with few SW which do crash in Win10 more than in Win7

    Hope this helps

    Thanks, Jura
     
  8. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    Might have to OC my CPU again since it doesn't look like I'm doing much about my build at all.
     

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