Fermi bios editor guide

Discussion in 'Videocards - NVIDIA GeForce' started by civato, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    Question about the fremi clock calculator
    the calculaor gets my stock OC from the manufacture wrong
    it acts like my shadder is 5MHz less
    here is a screenshot of my stock bios and what the calcuator says it should be
    http://i.imgur.com/VLP43g9.png (Model: ENGTX550 TI DC/DI/1GD5)
    http://i.imgur.com/9WhqtjQ.png (Model: ENGTX550 TI DC TOP/DI/1GD5)
    http://i.imgur.com/RmNl5jw.png (Model: UL ENGTX550 TI DC/DI/1GD5)
    mine is the 1st one, the other copies 2 were in the same download from ASUS
    looks to be like a off by 5 issue, no idea how much thoes 2 numbers matter
     
  2. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    I wouldn't bother with the clock calculator.

    Take your core clock and just double it, u want a 1:1 ratio with the clock and the shader.

    For instance most fermi chips except the 470 480 series can handle about 150mhz increase on the core/ shader from stock without a voltage increase.

    Typically for instance a 460 starts at 650mhz/ 1300mhz shader at 950mv, it handles 800mhz core 1600mhz shader at 950mv. Anything beyond 800mhz up to 900mhz requires 1.125v so that's 900mhz core 1800mhz shader at 1.125v. On the 460 max stable typically is 900mhz core 1800mhz shader and 1800mhz memory.

    [​IMG]

    Good luck
     
  3. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    I know that 1GHz is unstable (furmark fails)
    995MHz is stable at stock voltage
    the 4 and 11 boxes are what i am confused on
    i noticed box 3 is double the clock speed and 5 is the memory speed
    my card has plenty of headroom for voltage bumps, but i want it to stay quiet and the fan gets significantally louder at even slightly higher RPMs
    i was going to set the clock to 995 and the memory to 2257
    http://i.imgur.com/PoFM442.png - MSI afterburner config
    would i be better off with the memory at 2100? like the asus extreme model or 2257 like the evga superclocked version
     
  4. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    If 995mhz is stable then 1ghz will require 1.125v on the new low nanometer fermi cores for instance from the 550ti.

    I see your using the 550 Ti so leave memory at stock there's nothing to gain on 192bit memory overclocks. Leave at stock. For the core clock on air even with no voltage regulator heatsink like all 550 Ti's run 3, 4, 11 at 2000 which means 1000mhz core clock and 2000mhz shader. Pump voltage to 1.125v and it's perfectly stable on the 550 Ti at 1000Mhz. Use Nibitor save the 550bios.rom and open in win98 bootable flash drive via dos prompt. Add nvflash files to the flash drive main directory. Type "nvflash 550bios.rom -5 -6" Enter next next done. Your golden totally stable 1ghz at 1.125v.... Add a voltage regulator heatsink towards the back by the 6-pin and get 1050 to 1100mhz at 1.125v. Although 1050-1100 may require 1.137-1.150 for awesome performance just gotta add the voltage regulator heatsink go for 100% copper and 1 large heatsink to cover all vregs with thermal adhesive glue or thermal adhesive material.

    I recommend to leave memory at stock at what 2100mhz... That's if its a 192bit card. The 256bit memory can handle potentially 100mhz more than stock.

    In Nibitor set clock 3, 4, 11 to 2000 and set P15 voltage to 1.125v and it'll be stable.

    Voltage regulators may overheat and cause unstable overstock if u don't have a heatsink on them.

    Otherwise u may try setting clock 5 (memory) to 100mhz higher than stock...

    good luck
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013

  5. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    I would rather not up the voltage, may do that after i swap some fans out
    i could safely handle more heat, but i dont want added fan noise for only 5MHz
    i think i have a HS behind the power plug, that would be to the left of the power plug with the plug facing the side panel right?
    http://i.imgur.com/TIryunn.jpg - circled the little heat sysnc near the power plug

    so box 3=1990;5=2100;4 & 11=1990 acording to you but 2000 according to the calculator, and 2090 based on the pattern given based on the ASUS stock settings for this card's series which is 5 less than the calculator gives
    but what does 4 and 11 actually do?
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  6. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    The calculator is a waste of time it abides by the clock generator which really doesn't matter. Don't let the calculator get u confused. Just have a standard increment of 25mhz. so if u don't want 2000 settle for 1975 as it will round up automatically to the closest clock in the clock generator which abides by the general rule of 25.

    The 550 Ti is an ULTRA LOW Power GPU so even at 1.125v and 1000mhz it hits like 50C under load and fans are always quiet...

    You won't hear any more fan noise it'll be super quiet so don't worry.

    Set to 2000 as i said before for 1000mhz and 2100-2200mhz on memory and don't touch the memory latency parameters.

    Just as an idea u can go to EBAY and search GR23P it's the dell oem GTX 460 1gb DDR5 @ 256bit - It'll eat the 550 Ti for breakfast at stock clocks. Push to 900mhz core, 1800mhz shader, 1800mhz memory at 1.125v and it's well beyond running 2 550 Ti's in SLI at 1000Mhz a piece. Trust me I tested it.

    The special GR23P has One, yes that's right. One PCI-E power 6-pin so it uses less than 125W just like the 550 Ti.

    The GR23P is $85 Shipped and is the best gpu for the money on the planet.

    A month ago there was a lot for sale. I have been advocating them for quite some time, looks like there isn't much. Search where ever u can the GR23P - It's an insanely awesome gpu. I ran the best Nvidia Demo on it meant to only run on the Titan with two of these in SLI at 900Mhz and was getting 25fps, do that same test on two GTX 470's at 835mhz a piece and I'm getting 35fps. The 460's may hit 75C under load at 900mhz but the performance is awesome. They handle 800mhz core clock at 950mv by stock and hit like 50C under load.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  7. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    ok, that explains a lot
    a GTX 460 is a power hog, and i can run my CPU at 4.2GHz stable and a phenom II drinks power at high clock speeds like that i don't want to have to get a 650W PSU which would eat any saving up
    If i wanted to get a new GPU i would probably go for a 650 TI boost and sell my 550 TI which i got for $67 after rebate

    furmark can push this GPU to 67C if i don't touch the fan speed, the default fan curve on MSI afterburner keeps it at 60-62C during that test
    furmark actually gets it almost 5C hotter than heaven 4.0
    in my old case with a side fan on it the max heaven temp was 55C and the fan speed stays at 30% until 60-61C, hoping getting a bottom fan for this case will drop the temps to keep the fan speed at 30%, when ever newegg sends me one of those 20% case fans coupons

    since my stock config is 910MHz do i add 25 increments to that or do i add that to reference 900MHz
     
  8. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    If your reference is 910 the shader will be 1820. I abide by steps of 25 always so I'd change it to 1850 for 925, or 1900 for 950, or 1950 for 975 core clock.

    The pci-e slot at 16x gives 75 watts. One 6-pin pci-e power gives 75W, so that's a total of 125w.

    The 550 Ti has the slot (75w) and the 1 6-pin pci-e (75w) so it uses less than 125w.

    The GR23P has the slot (75w) and the 1 6-pin pci-e (75w) so it uses less than 125w.

    The GTX 460 GR23P has one 6-pin so it uses less than 125W. It also has the glorious 256 bit GDDR5 video memory running at 1800mhz. So when it comes down to it, the GR23P is getting more work done while using the same wattage as the 550 Ti. It also uses less power than the 650 Ti Boost with it's 2 x 6-pin pci-e power so it can use up to 225 watts which means more heat.

    If you want more gpu performance rely on the memory bit specification over all else. If you get a 650 Ti boost your upgrading from 192 bit gddr5 to 192 bit gddr5. Memory bit means everything because it's the data channel communicating data between the powerful gpu core and the memory. The higher the bit the faster the communication between the gpu core and the memory. You speed up the bit, you therefore speed up the gpu core. The gpu core is always limited by the speed at which the memory can communicate with the core.

    For instance math explains it all even know we may all think the 650 Ti boost is better sure it's core is of not only of higher performance than the 460 but runs cooler. However the core is not as important as the memory bit channel bottleneck.

    256 bit is 33.33% faster than 192 bit if the core will permit the increase.
    384 bit is 50.00% faster than 256 bit if the core will permit the increase.

    192 bit has a maximum potential of 2.23517e-8 Gigabytes
    256 bit has a maximum potential of 2.98023e-8 Gigabytes
    384 bit has a maximum potential of 4.47035e-8 Gigabytes

    The GTX 260 and GTX 280

    GTX 260's 448 bit had a maximum potential of 5.21541e-8 Gigabytes
    GTX 280's 512 bit had a maximum potential of 5.96046e-8 Gigabytes
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  9. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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  10. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    I would always use MSI or EVGA to dial in the temps. Use a profile from 0C 0% to 75C 100%. In 1 linear slope to update every 1000ms and hyst. to 0 and force update at interval.

    Send me the bios.rom and I'll configure it to optimum.

    Make sure the fan in the built in profile is set to 40% min to 100% max but 25% min is okay to 100% fan. If the bios doesn't allow past 70% it will never go beyond 70%. Meaning you have to change the bios to allow 100% or it will only be able to reach 70% and cause overheating.

    Set 3, 4, 11 to 2000 and 5 to 2075 (which may be unstable so stick to an even number of 2050) then go to the voltage and set P15 to 1.125v and don't rely on Furmark, that's a sure way to fry your card. Use games or benchmarks see if it'll run through 3dmark11 and your golden. 3dmark11 stresses the gpu like a game would so you can rest assured all games will be stable.

    In regards to GPU's and if your willing and can find it, there is a super special rare version of the GTX 660 which is OEM only and has 256 bit memory as well as 2GB of GDDR5 with the insane performance of the GTX 760 2GB GDDR5. It's actually probably the same as the 760 because it has the same performance.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013

  11. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    I send it via PM,BTW when i said it was unstable i was using MSI afterburner to test it before flashing
    is furmark a reliable way to test stability?
     
  12. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    Thanks and cool. I sent it back. Just ask me and I'll tell u what is a known stable clock. I always test in 3dmark11 as it's a good indicator or the best indicator for stability. If you notice atifacts but it passes, it's unstable. Set that fan slope profile I said first. I would never use furmark or any stress testing app as it'll fry your card. Always set vsync to keep the gpu under 99% utilization or your more likely to become unstable.

    If your case has a 120mm fan in the front, make it suck air in, so it blows right over the back of the gpu where the voltage regulators are. If your hard drive is in the way, make a clear clean path so no wires at all are in the way. I recommend setting the fan to full speed to because the GTX 550 Ti has no vreg heatsink so the vregs get very hot by stock and much hotter overclocked. Yet they seem to run stable without any airflow over the voltage regulators at 1000mhz @ 1.125v.

    Let me know and if u have any questions I'm happy to help.
     
  13. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    GPU:
    ASUS / 550 TI / 1024
    i have a 120 and 140 mm fan intakes and exhaust, i want to get 2 more 140mm intakes and replace the 120mm
    2 cooler master sickle flow and 2 140mm fractal fans one of each for intakes and exhaust
    i am a wire management freak, there is not a single wire in the way of any airflow or the view of any parts for that matter

    i have not managed to get anything to make a artifact, just crash something
    i will use heaven 4 and 3dmark to check stability, any others i should use?
    i linked a picture earlier i circled part of my GPU is that a HS on the voltage regulator?
     
  14. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    Use only 3dmark11 only once maybe twice but once is enough, if it passes your golden. Don't run it over and over just go play your favorite game because thats the ultimate test is time. Play as long as you can.

    See the heatsink at the back? That's the vregs... Most don't have that heatsink.

    [​IMG]

    At the back all those little chips are voltage regulators and they all hit 100C regularly under load on stock clocks. If they approach 200C stability will be at stake. Although it doesn't seem to get that hot and runs stable at 1.125v and 1000mhz without the heatsink.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  15. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    i do have a heat sysc in that location, not as big as that, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 that size, guessing that was not a 550 ti and was a higher end card with more regulators on it
    edit:eek:k that was a 550 TI, guess my card only has a heat sync on the 1st few regulators that do the most work
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013

  16. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    Well that's a bit odd, they all do the most work since they are all there to handle a division of the power coming in which is in the 125 watt realm. So basically you have 15 regulators so you take your total possible consumption divided by 15, so 125 divided by 15 equals 8.3 watts per regulator. That means that 8.3 watts converted to Celsius heat units per minute is 0.26* Celsius per minute. So that means that each one of these in 10 hours at max load will see 156* Celsius without any ambient and without any dissipation. In 5 hours just 78* Celsius per regulator but thats not including the heat generated by not only the gpu core but also the super hot memory chips on the pcb. So we could easily see in the 100*+ Celsius. On higher end gpu's there are more handling more power etc.

    If you don't have any thermal paste, I would recommend you pick some up on ebay. The very large long lasting tube of 25 grams Arctic Silver Ceramique 2. Because it costs $7.44 shipped and keeps temps very low as it's very effective. Not only that but you don't have to worry about spill over because it's not electrically conductive, only very thermally conductive.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Arctic-Silv...hermal_Compounds_Supplies&hash=item35c9925dde

    I think this is your gpu
    [​IMG]

    Also, When you re-paste this gpu add and spread the layer by finger across this whole surface. Very thin layer enough to transfer heat and not spill over much under compression.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  17. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    can't be the capacitors are out of place
    here are some pics, sorry i have a crappy camera
    http://imgur.com/a/iI7oQ
    you should be able to see the little dinky HS under the primary cooler
     
  18. chris89

    chris89 Member Guru

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    Thats cool yeah can't see it but I can see a little, looks like a nice one. They should run cooler and handle the 1ghz and 1.125v without issue.
     
  19. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    you probably are not seeing a little, that is the entire thing, it appears to only cover the area near the power plug on the card
    i could see it only covering 1/2 of one of the regulators
    the push pin spring in there is where the HS ends
    you would think they would have put one to cover all of them if they are going to put one on there, maybe the TOP and Ultimate versions have bigger ones on them
    i tested the OC in msi afterburner in valley, heaven, 3dmark11, alien vs predator benchmarks without issue
    just seems strange to me that the calculator says 4 and 11 should be 2105 while you say 2000 and following the pattern ASUS used on there OCs setting 4/11 to what the calc says -5 for 2100
     
  20. evilkittie

    evilkittie Member

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    [​IMG]
    why does it show 999/1999 and not 1000,2000?
    and get finger oils in the paste, nty
    GPUs don't have that cover like a CPU does it? so you cant just use hte grain of rice method, correct?
    i guess one of those disposable rubber gloves would work
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013

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