Extensive Vulnerability Discovered with WIFI WPA2 Security

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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  2. ubercake

    ubercake Master Guru

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    KRACK ATTACK!
     
  3. Biffo

    Biffo Active Member

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    Routers under Windows will be safe against this exploitation since most lock up for 24hrs after so many failed attempts plus no hacker gonna wait around for months or years till all the keys are decrypted.
     
  4. sammarbella

    sammarbella Ancient Guru

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    Don't worry that's only some billion devices affected...
     

  5. rl66

    rl66 Ancient Guru

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    yes Lilux sound better :) ... don't worry we understand typonese too.

    More seriously most wireless system are just like a big door with "come in, it's open" written on it.

    but despite that people want more of it, even in their car and in their credit card (btw 1st version of pay without touch were making card detected by bt/wifi sniffer ... imagine how security is taken seriously ... :eek: )
     
  6. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    Unlike OS or software specific security issues, this is not something that should be made widely known. Most people who use WPA2 are not able to opt for something else or update their device in a useful way. So, I feel like Vanhoef and Piessens have just put waaaay more people at risk than they were before their discovery.

    Think of it like this:
    Imagine someone brings a backpack with a bomb in it in a shopping mall, and just leaves the backpack in the middle of the mall. Then an announcement is made that this backpack has a weapon in it. By letting everyone know that there is something deadly in that backpack, it dramatically increases the probability of someone with malicious intent from using it, possibly before security can diffuse the situation. If the announcement was never made, sure, somebody would've figured it out eventually, but the probability of the weapon being used would be dramatically decreased.

    So the fact of the matter is, the situation was insecure no matter what, but because an announcement was made, that just made things a whole lot worse.
     
  7. GlennB

    GlennB Master Guru

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    Security through obscurity is not a great way to handle any leak. We cannot know for sure whether this leak has not been found by someone else already.
     
  8. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    I agree, but with one crucial caveat: if there is a widely available fix. Without a fix, all this announcement does is just beg hackers to take advantage of people. At the very least, they shouldn't have disclosed the details. Just merely telling consumers to look into upgrading their devices due to "a security issue regarding WPA2" ought to be enough. A statement like that may encourage uninformed hackers to try finding out what's wrong, but they don't know what's wrong, which still buys people time. Companies and developers who need/want to address the problem may contact people like these researchers personally to get the information they need to correct the problem.

    There's a right way to approach this situation, and announcing so many details to the public was probably the worst way to go about it; obscurity would've been better. WPA2 has been around for a long time and I'm not aware of any hackers who took advantage of it. But, now there will be.
     
  9. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

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    How about... explicitly define allowed devices via MAC address.

    Not practical in a large network, but good fix for home/personal use.
     
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  10. JJayzX

    JJayzX Master Guru

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    This attack uses a spoofed MAC. MACs have been easily spoofed for a long time also.
     
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  11. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

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    OK so he retreives my client's MAC address and spoofs it, but what's gonna happen later when two identical MAC clients are connected? None will work correctly?
     
  12. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    I suppose it depends on what they're trying to do. If the hacker doesn't intend on breaching the security of the spoofed MAC, they could still get in your network disguised as your PC and do whatever else they want. In some cases, the router or conflicting PC won't care if there are duplicate MACs. In the event something does care, the hacker just has to wait until you sign off.
     
  13. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

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    The more I read about this... this be some serious shiit. A someone directly hacking my personal device(s), that's the least of problems.
     
  14. HeavyHemi

    HeavyHemi Ancient Guru

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    Krack is whack!
     
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  15. Athlonite

    Athlonite Maha Guru

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    Oh great lets put out a video showing any wood-be hacker how it's done a simple there's a security problem with WPA2 and you'll need to update your device when a fix is availably statement would have sufficient
     

  16. geogan

    geogan Master Guru

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    How does the attacker get a valid MAC address that is on the allowed list though? He would never get in by just randomly searching through thousands of MAC addresses. Do they use some method to find out the MACs of devices already on the network?
     
  17. geogan

    geogan Master Guru

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    Anyway let me play devil advocate here...

    TBH that Krack "attack" to me is just another way for the government agencies to trick or frighten users into updating all the routers in existence with their latest "approved" firmware which is loaded with their own backdoors and snoops. IMO it is better to have a 1% chance of some lonely hacker deciding he wants to try and get into your network than 100% chance you now have installed the NSAs latest backdoor entry toolkit on your router... i'm keeping my own 6 year old router firmware to keep NSA out...
     
  18. Noisiv

    Noisiv Ancient Guru

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    yup

    airodump-ng
     
  19. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag Ancient Guru

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    I'd gladly take the NSA spying on me than a stranger who wants to steal my personal info and bankrupt me or pin a serious crime on me. Sure, I don't like the NSA spying on me in principle, but if you think your old WPA2 router can protect you from that, you are mistaken.
     
  20. Athlonite

    Athlonite Maha Guru

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    well The just aswell my Router is German made then they'll just tell the NSA nein friggin zee firmwarez
     

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