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Difference between OC Scanner and manual overclock

Discussion in 'MSI AfterBurner Overclock Application Discussion' started by Storm Alert, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. Storm Alert

    Storm Alert New Member

    Messages:
    2
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    GPU:
    RTX 2060
    Recently purchased an RTX-2060-FE and using MSI Afterburner 4.6.0 beta 15.

    Using the OC Scanner option gives me an overclock curve which starts 100MHz higher than the curve I would get by setting a manual overclock, both end up about 2100MHz on the curve and are stable with benchmarks and games that max the graphics card out. I am finding frequency typically settles down around 2010-2040MHz with prolonged play.

    The reason I am asking is that I play a couple of older games which typically have the graphics card performing around the 800-1200MHz range and the OC Scanner overclock makes them more prone to occasionally crash to desktop. At stock no crashes at all.

    So I think I need to tinker with the curve to lower frequency at the lower voltage points (to match stock) so maybe make the curve climb a bit steeper towards the highest frequency? The graph curve voltage range is 700-1250mV (but I believe the 2060 max allowable voltage is 1050mV or 1068mV) and I haven't ticked unlock voltage control and unlock voltage monitoring. Is unticking these only relevant to trying to get a higher overclock or do I need to untick to tinker with the curve?
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
  2. Storm Alert

    Storm Alert New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    RTX 2060
    Up until now I had always applied a manual oc, but now I'm playing with the oc scanner. Having looked at the curve it created it has got me thinking about how the overclock is applied at lower frequencies. A manual oc applies the same frequency increase to all voltage points. The Afterburner oc scanner applies a curve which for my graphics card is highest at the lowest frequency and lowest at the highest frequency (range 195MHz to 120MHz). This has got me asking the following questions:

    What is the point of boosting frequency at the lower end?
    Is the only benefit a higher frequency for a lower given voltage point?
    If the game needs more frequency it will just get it anyway?

    So my thinking is the curve should be tracking stock frequencies/voltage until at least the boost frequencies are reached and only then applying the overclock delta. i.e.The only games that need the overclock will be getting it at maximum frequency. As the Afterburner oc scanner does not do that I wondered what the rationale behind the curve it produces is?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  3. cookieboyeli

    cookieboyeli Master Guru

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    41
    GPU:
    ZotacAE 1080Ti@2075
    You've been missing out on the face that nvidia has been using this curve method for card clocks since boost 3.0 came out with the 1000 series.
    The OC scanner is also made by nvidia.
    --
    Sorry that's all I really have time to tell you.
    Anyone else want to contribute to some education here?
     

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