Did anybody here get a refund from Intel or OEM for heartbeat etc?

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by Ne1l, Mar 1, 2021.

  1. Ne1l

    Ne1l Active Member

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    I had an interesting conversation with an old colleague a while back, in a nutshell;

    "If any customer contacted the OEM due to the degraded performance of their cluster, the OEM was able to replace the loss of performance and charge all the costs back to Intel"

    *Example figures for simplicity's sake let's say for Heartbeat, Meltdown etc microcode updates caused a 10% loss of performance.

    A 10 Rack Cluster (400 servers) was sold with a specified teraflop requirement - the OEM would ship another rack, with all the trimmings, including Infiniband, Cisco switches, PDU's etc..

    Some customers were cheeky enough to ask for even more due to the higher electricity costs to run the extra rack!!

    Did anybody get or hear of normal people getting compensated? I guess more a question for American's as they like class actions etc.
     
  2. jaggerwild

    jaggerwild Master Guru

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    Were over clockers not, IT guys! Yeah the common man Got Nothing cause as always the lawyers made sure we did. Not sure about enterprise level.
     
  3. Ne1l

    Ne1l Active Member

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    Overclockers or not if I'd spent $1000 on a i9-10980x + $1000 on a new motherboard and memory and 6 months later got 30% less performance I wouldn't be a happy chappy.. especially if I bought a system from an OEM.

    Very pragmatic of you though and probably why Intel continue do a half-arsed improving x86.. let AMD do all the leg work and when license renewal comes around demand a full cross-patent license and reap the rewards of AMD's labour.. like x86-64.

    Which is why I hope Nvidia's purchase of ARM goes through, then x86 can be dropped back a more 'co-processor role' for anybody needing x86 software.. however Apple and MS are emulating x86-64 on ARM so why add to the BOM if you don't need to.

    **imagine if Nvidia put the Transmeta IP they bought into ARM 'for free' and then all ARM Processors could execute x86 code natively??
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2021
  4. Raserian

    Raserian Member Guru

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    Either of these is unlikely to happen, replacing x86 with ARM is not real at least for forseeble time being and Intel has transmeta license too.
     

  5. Ne1l

    Ne1l Active Member

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    Transmeta 'emulates' x86 instructions so Intel doesn't really need to emulate it's own IP -- Intel were worried about this as part of their now expired GPU IP deal they insisted Nvidia not to continue trying to emulate x86 instructions.

    I didn't mean ARM would replace x86 in the near future but it could be enabled to run x86 when and if needed - MS and Apple seem to be able to run x86-64 code on ARM via software (maybe it's hardware?!?) if not hardware then Transmeta IP could be run in silicon and therefore x86 'emulated' apps might get a speed boost so nobody could tell the difference.
     
  6. Raserian

    Raserian Member Guru

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    Emulation was always possible that's true but it's slow and energy intensive, none of which are desirable in general much less in laptops. Can't comment on how much better it would be if emulation would be done by hardware directly because I don't know. Are there any non-x86 CPUs with this capability?
     

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