Copying files from a failing hard drive to a new one?

Discussion in 'SSD and HDD storage' started by axeten, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. axeten

    axeten Member

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    Hi,
    I have a 2TB WD Caviar green as a storage drive in my PC (not the windows drive). It is starting to fail (bad sectors / super slow).

    I can still see the drive in My Computer and access it. It takes ages for any folders to open but they eventually do.

    I purchased a new 3TB WD Caviar green and want to try and copy everything across. I have tried just copying in windows 7 and also the WD Acronis true image but both of them fail after 30 minutes or so.

    Is there another option i have for trying to get the data off the drive? Maybe something in DOS rather than windows?
     
  2. IcE

    IcE Don Snow Staff Member

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  3. rflair

    rflair Don Commisso Staff Member

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  4. Extraordinary

    Extraordinary Ancient Guru

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    Also been known to repair failing drives into a usable state again

    Not that I would trust a drive after it already failed once
     

  5. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    Interesting he chose to replace a bad drive with a larger one of the same type lol.

    The 'green' drives were by accident. Apparently the reliability was bad at 7200 rpm so they reduced the speed to 5900 rpm, with the side effect of using less power. Any eco drives should really be avoided these days.
     
  6. mbk1969

    mbk1969 Ancient Guru

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    You can use GetDataBack app. Choose version matching file system on HDD.
     
  7. rflair

    rflair Don Commisso Staff Member

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    That is not true, many enterprise drives, like the WD Red series operate at 5900RPM. With mechanical drives these days the cost difference in the series of drive usually comes down to the warranty.

    Black drives have a marginally better CPU on-board and RED drives have some NAS features enabled, where as Green drives have a basic CPU and no NAS enabled features.

    But the cost difference for the most part is the warranty, Greens having the least 1-2 years, Red and Blue 2-3 years, Black 3+ years. Failure rate is pretty similar across the board, cost of replacement for the manufacture because of warranty is the biggest price difference.
     
  8. anticupidon

    anticupidon Ancient Guru

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    Op,that data is very valuable to you?
    Go to a computer shop with good reputation,ask for a price .
    If not,DIY route all the way,but stop and think a bit about extracting the data.
    Each time you acces that failing drive,you damage it a bit more.
    Best scenario is to clone that drive,but there is a catch.
    The biggest problem when reading data from a failing drive can be the cache memory,it caches in advance,accesing bad sectores from ahead ,thus hindering the reading process
    A better approach should be cloning it in reverse,bit by bit.
    There is a tool who does just that ,called dd_ rescue.
    It is a linux based tool,but that should not scary you.
    Also,altough in the grey zone of software licesing ,there is Falcon4 Live Cd.
    It contains a GUI tool based on ddrescue and can copy/clone in reverse.
    Make sure you have enough RAM.
     
  9. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    I was referring to originally, and it still holds true for 'consumer' green drives. Enterprise drives are actually better, the extra cost doesn't just buy you extra warranty. The MTBF of Enterprise drives is significantly higher. I believe only WD sell green drives still, Seagate said they were a waste of time these days which is why they no longer sell them. From memory the MTBF of the green drives were always lower than standard drives.

    http://storageeffect.media.seagate....ect/why-seagate-said-goodbye-to-green-drives/

    Who knows, maybe hdd's are binned too? Lol
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
  10. ArgonV

    ArgonV Master Guru

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    Believe it or not, many times on a failing drive I fridge it. Then I get one room of my house very cold and do the data transfer after pulling it out of the fridge:

    http://lifehacker.com/5515337/save-a-failed-hard-drive-in-your-freezer-redux

    At my company, sometimes as a last resort before we pay a hard drive recovery company to manually extract data from the platters I place the drive in our server chiller room before the cold air hits the racks. Saved my butt (And money) more than a few times..
     

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