computer shutdowns (as if unplugged) while in games.

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by pilike, May 4, 2011.

  1. morbias

    morbias Don TazeMeBro Staff Member

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    Are you using an 8pin power connection to the motherboard? Because you really should be with that system configuration, and it could well be the problem if you are only using a 4pin connection.
     
  2. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    Oh ya good point I completely forgot about the 8-pin CPU plug thing lol, oops. Though, for an old school K8 dual core, do you really need the 8-pin? My brother's Athlon II 245 works with just plugging in the 4-pin (then again he uses a Radeon HD 3650) but the GPU's power is supplied by the PSU's PCIe power doesn't it?

    My quad core is running off a 4-pin as well (my motherboard only supports a 4-pin CPU plug).

    deltatux
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2011
  3. morbias

    morbias Don TazeMeBro Staff Member

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    Good question, I was thinking along the lines of whether the possibility exists that the motherboard uses some of the power from that connection for the PCIe slot and other onboard devices.
     
  4. pilike

    pilike Member

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    Right now I am using only a 4pin, (I'm with the backup source while my source (which had 8pin power to the mobo) is on service).
    The problem persists, with this 500W source if i give power to the VC only from the PSU, in games instantly (like unplugged) shuts down, but if I supplied power to the VC from an aditional PSU (a 400W crapy noname PSU) it works flawlessly, no shutdowns, no nothing (except for a strange background low cracking sound while in games, sometimes in movies also).
     

  5. morbias

    morbias Don TazeMeBro Staff Member

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    It seems fairly conclusive then that the PSUs you have been using can't provide enough current on the +12v rail. Can you borrow something more powerful to make sure?
     
  6. deltatux

    deltatux Ancient Guru

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    Try with an 8-pin. If that doesn't work, your PSU is faulty.

    deltatux
     
  7. pilike

    pilike Member

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    Thanks for the input guys, I'll try to borrow a stronger PSU, and if that's the case .. I'll replace mine with a stronger/better one :).
    If any has any other oppinions on the matter, feel free to share, I've read threads with the same problem as mine where the problem wasn't the PSU .. so ... gotta look at all possibilities.
     
  8. Veteran

    Veteran Ancient Guru

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    Sometimes this can happen from what you have described...when the board is being shorted out by the case or a dodgy spacer/screw connection.

    Tapping the case with the side off where the cable management is can reveal this problem if you have it...run your fingers along and press in certain spots on the case to see if it occurs.
     
  9. pilike

    pilike Member

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    I am not sure it applies, I tried with different PSUs, the only thing I did not tried yet is with a powerful PSU.
     
  10. pilike

    pilike Member

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    Stupid noob question ... in the requirements section of the presentation sheet on EVGA website for EVGA GTX 570 SC ( http://www.evga.com/products/pdf/012-P3-1572.pdf ) is written that:
    Could you illuminate me with this easy 'problem'?
    +12 volt rail = the 6pin connector that powers the video card, right? so my card uses 2x +12 volt rails.
    These 6pin can be single, one direct (single cables) connection from the PSU or can be on the same PSU cables, serial 2x6pins (which is bad because amperage is split between), right?

    They also can be 'made' from another 4pin Molex connectors, which is not too good due the fact that there amperage might vary depending on system load, right?
    Also .. when you connect the adaptor from Molex --> 6pin PCIE, you have 2 Molex inputs on the adaptor, if you would connect both of them on the same cable that has 2 or more Molex connectors is the same as you would connect only one (due to serial amperage splitting), right? So if you still want to do it with Molex-PCIE-6pin adaptor, you connect 2molex from different cables, no?
    Is also (I presume) important to not share that cable with other components (like .. on Molex cable you also have a HDD (case where again amperage would split and vary depending on your HDD load, which again would be bad for Video Card)).

    So .. when in requirements it states "48 amps on the +12 volt rail" what exactly means? Each single direct cables from PSU 6pin to have 38 amps or the combined 2x 6pin connectors to have 38 amps? (like .. 2 x 6pin 19+ amps)

    Please, if you reply, explain me punctual on how this PCIE power stuff works and in a little detail, to not ask again and bother you with another set of lame questions. Thanks for taking time to answer me and again sorry for the 'low level' of my knowledge in this department. Some statements might be VERY stupid, and again, sorry. :)
     

  11. pilike

    pilike Member

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    Last edited: May 8, 2011
  12. Nono06

    Nono06 Master Guru

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    Well, you have corsair PSU that has only one massive 12V rail.(http://www.corsair.com/power-supplies/modular-psus/professional-series-1/hx650w.html)
    This type of PSU is the easiest to use. Whatever 12V peripheral you connect to it, the power is delivered by a unique rail (up to 52A in the example).
    As I said before when you have multiple rails the important information that is usually missing is how the rails are split across the connectors.
    On my PSU I have 2 PCIE 8 pins and 3 PCIE 6 pins but the stupid thing is that one rail is delivering power to one 8pins and one 6 pins connectors. (Hopefully for me the information was in the doc). Connecting my quad setup using the PSU PCIE cables was making the PC turning off in heavy stressing tests. (Vantage in Xtrem config, Crysis Wars@max when using the alien weapon...)
    So Now I'm using the 2 PCIE-8 coming from the PSU (power coming from 2 different rails) and using 2 molex adaptors for the two 6-pin PCIE.
    If you have a working PSU there is no problem in using molex. Power remains exactly the same on those. Moreover HDD, DVD... use almost nothing in term of power so it is clearly not a problem.
    Having multiple rails could be an advantage when doing extreme OC because each peripheral connected to a rail could introduce noise on the power line and this could create instability but it is clearly not your/my case :)
     
  13. Makalu

    Makalu Ancient Guru

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    The 12V/38A recommendation is for powering the complete system and refers to the power supplies total 12V output rating regardless of the number of 12V "rails". Some PSU 12V output ratings are given in the sticky above...many cheap units don't disclose the rating and your AXP 630 is one of those. A more realistic total wattage rating for this one is probably around 550W and 12V amperage around 35A. But there is some headroom built into the 38A recommendation.

    Problem is more likely the dual rail configuration which is an issue with 5-600W units dual rail units coupled with modern high end cards. Standard puts your CPU connector/s on one rail and everything else on the other which is too much for a standard trip point in the mid 20A's causing the PSU to latch off and require AC reset.

    The only difference between a single vs. mult-rail design is comparable to a house with all of the wall outlets on one stupidly large 60A circuit breaker vs. putting the wall outlets on three different 20A circuits.
     

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