CCNA Training

Discussion in 'The Guru's Pub' started by Pzykotik, May 28, 2014.

  1. Pzykotik

    Pzykotik Ancient Guru

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    Hey Guru's! So, I'm in training mode again... I've gotten bored with MCITP training stuff, it's all so... Dull.

    I use Windows Server daily and I'm yet to come across something I haven't known, or been able to figure out in a few moments. I know that's the wrong attitude to have, and I will get around to completing an MCSE (or MCITP or whatever it will be called) at some point, but now... I want to take a look at a CCNA cert.

    So. Any tips for the training? I can probably spring for an actual switch but I'd rather do things virtually (small house and all). Also, anything I should watch out for!?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Darkest

    Darkest Ancient Guru

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    I'm not sure how it is now, but when I did them a long time ago they were pretty straight forward. As long as you've a fairly basic grasp of the material and your memory doesn't go blank every five seconds you'll fly through the majority of it.
     
  3. moab600

    moab600 Ancient Guru

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    lol. i start tomorrow to learn CCNA, as i done with MCSA and got 2008 and 2012 certifications.

    I let u know how it goes.
     
  4. Pzykotik

    Pzykotik Ancient Guru

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    Nice! Where did you train? At home?

    @Darkest, thanks!
     

  5. moab600

    moab600 Ancient Guru

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    I went to study it in a college, 8 months minus one month of doing all 4 tests(3 to get MCSA 2008 and another one from 2k12 upgrade).

    You can study alone, specially for certificates, in case u do u need to create virtual environment via VMWARE and run differences scenarios.

    Know the basics first- Domain, Active Directory, OU,Objects, DNS,DHCP...
     
  6. scatman839

    scatman839 Ancient Guru

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    Done 1 of the 4 modules to it (CEnt), next 3 next year.

    That one isn't that hard, but cisco often has specific ways of wording things that you need to learn, just like microsofts way of testing.
     
  7. NoviceRei

    NoviceRei Ancient Guru

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    this. there are things on the exam that sounds hard, but are really simple. It's just that Cisco words some things really weird at times.


    Anyway, for virtual Switches\Lab the best is GNS 3. It emulates (not simulate) the Cisco IOS, so practically it's the same thing as the real one. Problem is getting yourself a copy of Cisco's IOS because it's illegal. But with a few minutes on Google and i'm sure you'll find one. :wink:
     
  8. Corrupt^

    Corrupt^ Ancient Guru

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    CCNA should be easier then the MCITP, or at least alot less to study.

    CCNP and up is where it gets harder.
     
  9. Pzykotik

    Pzykotik Ancient Guru

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    Fantastic, thanks a lot! I'll get on this over the weekend =D
     
  10. Andrés

    Andrés Ancient Guru

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    CCNA is quite easy, but at the same time I learned a lot.
     

  11. Ryu5uzaku

    Ryu5uzaku Ancient Guru

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    Just read the material well and do the things stuff will be fine. I got best score in my ccna 4 course 95% correct from the final test cause I totally remembered the stuff by then.

    Not like I remember it now but... :D

    Well don't need it now either. I majored in programming and took networking as secondary.

    In a few years I need to go to school again to learn some leadership stuff and to get bit higher salary lol.
     
  12. Frohman0905

    Frohman0905 Master Guru

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    He could try Cisco Packet Tracer. No need for Cisco IOS copies and it covers almost everything in CCNA.
     
  13. NoviceRei

    NoviceRei Ancient Guru

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    Packet Tracer is good for the basic stuff. It even has simulated PCs and a better graphical interface. But once you get a bit deeper into the lessons (like past the basic routing and stuff, which is not that deep actually), then you get to realize the limitations of Packet Tracer.

    What Packet Tracer is good at that GNS3 can't do are switches. There are switches in GNS3, but those are 'redneck' switches. Routers that are given switch port modules basically, acts like core switches.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  14. Frohman0905

    Frohman0905 Master Guru

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    Yes, that's why I recommended it ;) CCNA, for me, is still the basics and I find packet tracer sufficient to study the labs. Like you said, packer tracer has switches which is a big topic in CCNA for learning STP and vlans for example. Also to get familiar with the Cisco IOS interface. The latest version of Packet Tracer even supports HSRP (still a few bugs but it works).

    I'm currently studying for CCNP and neither of the 2 simulators are sufficient to cover all the topics. You need real life switches and routers to study the labs, which I can thankfully get at work.

    What was also a big help for me, when I was studying for my CCNA, were the CBT Nuggets videos. You unfortunately need a paid account to be able to watch them but the explanation during the videos (by Jeremy Ciaro) was very clear and he keeps it interesting.

    For the exam itself, I don't know if this is still the same but when I passed my CCNA in 2011, there were 2 ways to take the exam:

    1. Pass ICND1 and then pass ICND2
    2. Take CCNA as 1 exam

    Both have their benefits but also their downsides. If you go for option 1, you have less subject material to study for each exam, but the questions are more detailed. When go you for option 2, you have to study more subject material but I've heard from a colleague of mine that the questions are less detailed. I went for option 1 but that's personal choice.

    Cisco exams are also very confusing at times. Read the questions carefully because some of them can fool you.
     
  15. NoviceRei

    NoviceRei Ancient Guru

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    definitely, nothing beats the real boxes. And if you're at CCNP level, having real boxes is almost a must (or at least, a big "plus"). unfortunately for me, even 2nd-hand stuff off of ebay are still expensive. :(

    and I totally forgot about CBT Nuggets and Jeremy. I love that man, funny at times. And he makes the learning less of a chore! :)
     

  16. Waylander

    Waylander Guest

    yeah, I'm thinking about this as well.
    We've moved to a cisco based IP telephony system, and whilst I have the telephony stuff all down pat I have no clue about the underlying network bits
     

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