Buffalo WSR-2533DHP Dual-Band WiFi Router has Beamforming Technology

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

    Messages:
    37,352
    Likes Received:
    6,390
    GPU:
    AMD | NVIDIA
  2. NAMEk

    NAMEk Master Guru

    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    GPU:
    Gainward/GTX560/2GB
    If it doesn't have moving antenna with parasitic elements forming beam, then it's bull****. I have WZR-1166DHP router and it's the worst router I've ever had. Buffalo support only said: "We are sorry you are disappointed by our product".
    Wifi range AC (power 100%) 10M inside, thin walls.
    Wifi range A,B,G,N (power 100%) 3M inside, thin walls.
    Speed is also disappointing. Like 10 times lower than advertised. Software hangs every 2 - 3 days, UPNP often fails, latest firmware. And No it's not defective unit...
    I suggest everybody to stay away from Buffalo, they aren't what they used to be anymore.
     
  3. 91LudeSiT

    91LudeSiT Master Guru

    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    MSI 4GD5T@1435/1750
    I don't often post here unless I feel I have something important to say, and it often goes ignored. However this is a subject I suffered with for a while.

    First off, consumer grade wireless gear is utter garbage. It has become such a commodity that it is no longer possible to get a decent setup. This includes the high end products as well. I tried just about every AC router that Asus and Netgear offered and just got tons of issues, disconnects, sub par range, and performance.

    Second, the AC beamforming spec is BS. It changes the phase of the wireless signal to extend the beam in one direction which causes tons of interference in other directions. The only true beamforming I've seen on Ruckus Wireless APs as they have an adaptive antenna array. I use one of these in my house and my wireless range and throughput are second to none. My AP is capable of servicing up to 500 clients.

    Thirdly commercial grade wireless gear and network setups can be a daunting task for the average user. However there are lots of good, and even cheaper options. You can get gear from Ubiquiti that wouldn't set you back more than the cost of a high end consumer grade device.

    Hilbert if you could sneak in some reviews and setup information for some commercial grade stuff that would be neat and very informative for the user base around here. I'm also 900% certain companies like Ubuiquiti would provide you review products.
     
  4. NAMEk

    NAMEk Master Guru

    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    GPU:
    Gainward/GTX560/2GB
    I don't have much experience in enterprise network management. Can you name more companies like Ubuiquiti, I've never heard of it for some reason. Also some preliminary pricing would be nice.
    I've been playing with cheap Asus routers even without AC, and didn't find them awful, I felt like I got what I've paid for. I had a chance to play with more buffalo routers...one couldn't keep it's settings after power failure and another just kept dying on heavy usage.
     

  5. 91LudeSiT

    91LudeSiT Master Guru

    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    MSI 4GD5T@1435/1750
    Ubiquiti is actually a big player now at the entry level. Their AP's range from 70-140 USD. However they either require the ubiquiti management software to be installed on an active PC or you can use their inexpensive network appliance to handle the AP hand-off and management. It is about 70USD.

    I personally prefer Ruckus because their proprietary adaptive antenna arrays mean you need less AP's. I cover my 1600SQFT house and a good portion of my yard with 1AP. Which would require 2+ from ubiquiti. The trade-off is of course price, Ruckus indoor AP's tend to run 600-1500 USD. However they can be configured in standalone mode, or you can use them with a network appliance to manage multiple AP's.

    Ruckus now has a consumer brand called X-Claim and those AP's range from 150-250USD. They are also far easier to configure than the commercial stuff, but they are missing beamflex+ which is Ruckus's adaptive antenna array.

    Cisco also has some solutions, however they are not much cheaper than the ruckus stuff. My suggestion for the the home user is to consider Ubiquiti or X-Claim.

    I have friends using Ubiquiti equipment and friends using X-Claim equipment. Both are very happy with the respective products they are using.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2016
  6. BarryB

    BarryB Maha Guru

    Messages:
    1,163
    Likes Received:
    10
    GPU:
    Palit SJS 780 in SLI
    Beamforming? Saw that 3 years ago at the BETT show in London, might have been Ruckus or Aerohive?

    Ubiquiti I quite like as you just buy the AP, not a license for 'x' years, so it's yours to keep forever and they cost a lot less than a Meraki AP with a license so i've dumped Meraki in some clients premises and installed Ubiquiti UniFi AP AC PROs instead, installed the software controller on their servers and configured their wireless with the same SSID/WPA2 as previously configured so no re-configuring wireless devices!

    Saw Brocade have now bought Ruckus, that will be interesting as Brocade are helping upgrade our network to 10GB core and 1GB edge and we are looking for a wireless upgrade, so maybe we'll be 'Beamforming' too!!
     

Share This Page