Blackout at the Samsung factory should not affect DRAM prices in the first quarter of 2020

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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  2. Tiny_Clanger

    Tiny_Clanger Master Guru

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    Beleive that when i see it.
     
  3. m4dn355

    m4dn355 Member Guru

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    Money should be put aside for those kind of situations or 100% insurances. . . We are not Red Cross to support their power outages, chemical spills or God forgive deluge floods :mad:
     
  4. buhehe

    buhehe Master Guru

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    Insurance isn't free. Don't you think they'd charge more if they had higher expenses?
    These are businesses and their primary intent is to make money. We are not Red Cross, but neither are they.
     

  5. angelgraves13

    angelgraves13 Ancient Guru

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    Only in the world of tech, do consumers have to pay for a company's screw-ups. It's basically the Wild Wild West.
     
  6. NaturalViolence

    NaturalViolence Active Member

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    ....what? ALL industries do this. If a company screws up they either go bankrupt, pass the cost onto the consumer, or get bailed out by the government (which then gets the money from taxpayers). Those are the three options.
     
  7. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    While I have to say you're right @NaturalViolence , those are the three options, there's other options too, especially with huge companies like Samsung:
    Pay for insurance, or swallow up the cost to keep the customers at hand. They are more than wealthy enough to do that, being a big player in many fields of contemporary computer and telecommunications tech. And their products too have large enough profit margins to swallow up the "occasional" loss of production (miraculously happening each time prices have been dropping for some time).

    So if your restaurant has a black out, do you raise the prices of your meals on the next day because you couldn't serve as many during the blackout?
    If a car company's plant has an issue, does your car cost more when you buy it?
    If the copy machine in your office is broken for a day, do you charge customers more for whatever service you provide?
    If you are chopping down meat and for a day the health inspector is in and you have to shut down for a day so he can inspect the machines properly (even if everything's alright), do you raise the price of a steak for the next 3 months?
    When you are a contractor for dry walls and your tools break down on a customer's construction site, do you make him pay for your new tools directly, putting another 100$ on the bill and expect that to get paid afterwards with that reason?

    Logic dictates that the computer hardware business is especially down to supply and demand situations, where they do not act like in many, many other fields.
    And one thing, for all we know, they probably do have insurance, and still charge more in the end.
    Which is not fair, but fairly "normal". But we all should know, or expect, that prices are gouged and inflated by default, and probably even rigged (RAM anyone?).
     

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