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BenQ Releases EW277HDR Monitor

Discussion in 'Frontpage news' started by Hilbert Hagedoorn, Aug 15, 2017.

  1. Hilbert Hagedoorn

    Hilbert Hagedoorn Don Vito Corleone Staff Member

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    BenQ today launched EW277HDR video enjoyment monitor, combining advanced Vertical Alignment (VA) panels with  brightness, resolution, eye-care, and audio enhancement technologies specifically enginee...

    BenQ Releases EW277HDR Monitor
     
  2. Rugburn

    Rugburn Member Guru

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    I was a little excited until I read it's a 27" 1080p monitor.. Every >25" 1080p monitor I've seen, the colors look washed out because of the low pixel density.
     
  3. Corbus

    Corbus Ancient Guru

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    Glad VA is getting more popular.
     
  4. xrodney

    xrodney Master Guru

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    8 bit and 400 nits is too low for HDR.
     

  5. RavenMaster

    RavenMaster Maha Guru

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    1080p.... nope.
     
  6. thatguy91

    thatguy91 Ancient Guru

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    It's a mainstream monitor. No point having a fancy monitor if nobody can afford it!

    True, although with a computer you are sitting a lot closer to it than a TV. If it's too bright it doesn't make for good long gaming sessions particularly in a darkened room.
     
  7. gx-x

    gx-x Maha Guru

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    "official optimum HDR standard for LED/LCD TVs is the ability to display at least 1,000 Nits"
    ..and 10bit panel, and blah blah.

    BenQ....

    it's not supposed to be at 1000 nits all the time, that's the maximum nit that should be shown where there is a pure white. Also, array based backlightning is one of the things that is preferred on HDR displays sine you can have 1000nit at just one small segment of the display, or where is needed, and have very deep black elsewhere, or whatever other color you need. I said preferred, not mandatory, so make a note of it. :)

    edit: this monitor is just another case of " Dell HDR" where HDR is open to interpretation by manufacturer, or as it should be called: marketing.

    Doesn't mean it's a bad monitor (though, it's BenQ...) but it doesn't mean it's HDR or whatever they claim it to be. Almost everyone does this, though, it hurts a little less if you buy a cheap monitor/TV compared to 5000$ TV that also claims HDR but doesn't actually cover it.

    I mean, using software (like MadVR) I can play HDR content on my old dell P2314H monitor, converted to SDR...
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2017
  8. zehoo

    zehoo Member

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    No vesa mount and not a 10bit panel so it can not actually display HDR colour, though it can probably interpret the signal to be a slightly better 8bit display.
     
  9. waltc3

    waltc3 Master Guru

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    I had a 27" 1920x1200 monitor--and I could make out gaps between the pixels, so no thanks to a lesser resolution at that size. But I thought it was fine, actually, until I booted up my current 27" 2560x1440 monitor--seems about perfect at 27"--can't see individual pixels--very nice!

    http://us.aoc.com/product_feature.php?id=40 Love this thing--especially for ~$250 or so I paid for it via Amazon...;)
     
  10. gx-x

    gx-x Maha Guru

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    some of us wear minus glass lenses. What happens is, in my case, my 23" monitor looks like a 20" monitor. I would very much like 27" 1080p monitor, it would look like 23" monitor. ;)

    PS. You cant make out gaps between pixels, there are none. Seriously. Pixels are just bigger. Well, you could make out gaps if you use a magnifying glass or a macro photo but with naked eye? Hardly.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017

  11. Prince Valiant

    Prince Valiant Master Guru

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    Response times seem dodgy but I guess that's how it goes with VA.

    Whoever decided on the fake image needs a promotion :nerd:.
     
  12. gx-x

    gx-x Maha Guru

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    Those are almost honest response times, first one without overdrive (or maybe not), second one (4ms) with overdrive. Everyone saying 1ms gtg is lying. Consider that gtg is the fastest in response, where something like deep green or blue is usually 10x slower...but stating those wouldn't be much of a marketing strategy :p
     
  13. rm082e

    rm082e Master Guru

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    I have a 27" 1080p BenQ from 2013 on our house PC. If I sit close, I can certainly see the "screen door" that he is talking about - the space between the pixels. And that's within the range than the monitor is usable, so it is a problem if you like to sit close. On my gaming PC, I've got a 27" QHD. To see the screen door on that one, I have to sit so close that the monitor is unusable.

    My wife pushes the monitor to the back of the desk, so she doesn't see it. She likes the larger format. I typically want the biggest screen possible, but it can get big enough that pixel density is a problem.

    Also, I suspect the screen door effect is more pronounced on VA panels than IPS.
     
  14. Neo Cyrus

    Neo Cyrus Ancient Guru

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    Considering every HDR standard I have heard of requires 10 bit colour and generally a minimum of around 1000 nits (unless it can achieve true black like an OLED), I'm going to say I agree. Am I wrong? Am I remembering wrong?

    How the hell is this thing labeled HDR?
     
  15. gx-x

    gx-x Maha Guru

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    well, if you have a 1080p TV, you can also see space between pixels right? Especially on 32" and higher?
    cmon man, pixels are larger and you can see the pixels at best, but the space between them? There is no space between them, they are one next to the other...:3eyes:
     

  16. rm082e

    rm082e Master Guru

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    Please describe this picture I just snapped of a desktop icon on the house computer I mentioned earlier:

    [​IMG]

    What would you call that grid of dark lines that covers each of the icons in the picture?

    "Screen door" maybe? If someone said "the space between the pixels", would you say they were wrong?

    Keep in mind the screen door effect is going to be varying levels of noticeable depending on the panel type. My first HD screen was a Samsung DLP rear projection TV (2007), and that had no screen door at all, because the pixels were not in the screen - it was a projection TV. But the Panasonic plasma I replaced it with certainly does if you get close. It's a much better picture at proper viewing distances, but up close, it looks like sandpaper.

    On this monitor, I don't see the screen door until I get about 12" away. That's close, but if you're playing a game you might want to get close so the screen fills your vision. When I had my gaming PC on this monitor originally, it was a constant battle to sit just far enough back that I would avoid the screen door, but still enjoy a big presentation. I eventually bought a QHD monitor and moved my PC over to it, while leaving this one for the wife. It also allowed me to get rid of the KVM switch that she hated.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017
  17. gx-x

    gx-x Maha Guru

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    i cant see the picture. However,
    [​IMG]
    these are various pixels aligments, describe to me, where are the spaces? Keep in mind, to see these, you do need a macro photo at least, and your eye will fail at that.
     
  18. EJocys

    EJocys Member Guru

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    You are right, it is anti-consumer business practice 101.

    This thing is labelled HDR, because business is making more than £3 billion from unlawful misleading and aggressive practices just in UK.

    In UK, Consumer protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, specifies that statements that are incorrect or likely to create a false impression i.e. misleading actions (Regulation 5) considered unfair (Schedule 1) and lead to criminal liability.

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/1277/contents/made

    These monitors are not HDR, because they are not able to reproduce high-dynamic-range image on the screen and monitor manufacturers are breaking consumer laws in many countries by marking them with HDR label.
     
  19. sverek

    sverek Ancient Guru

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  20. rm082e

    rm082e Master Guru

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    The black areas - the space between the pixels - are what creates the screen door effect. What would you call those black areas?

    On a 27" 1080p monitor, you don't see black like you do under a microscope, but it is noticeable at close distances.


    Here's the same effect I'm seeing on my monitor when I get close, but this is not my image:

    [​IMG]

    Here's my image uploaded to another host. This is actually my monitor:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2017

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