ASUS A8R32-MVP OC Thread

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards AMD' started by cupper24, Jun 23, 2008.

  1. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Hey guys,

    I will be going for the big OC on my board, chip, and memory. I will be posting questions and updates here. But, don't hesitate to chime in and throw some advice at me if you want. Wish me luck!

    cupper24
     
  2. Psychlone

    Psychlone Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    1
    GPU:
    Radeon HD5970 Engineering
    Ohhh....ooohhh...ohhhhhhh - ME FIRST!!!! ;)

    Get ready, this is going to be a LOOONNNNG read! :D

    OK... PRINT THIS - you're gonna need it!!!!! ;)

    I'd like to begin this thread with a disclaimer.
    All hardware is different...2 machines with identical parts (even identical stepping on CPUs, etc.) will not overclock the same. There is no guarantee. You paid for parts that will perform at their advertised specifications, and what you're doing by overclocking is getting *more* than you paid for (hence the 'no guarantees' part.)
    What may work for one individual may or may not work for the next...even given the same exact components...just always remember this...sometimes you have to settle for less than what you originally expected - the way to make it 'ok' in your head is to remember the 'no guarantees' thing...you've already got 'something' for 'nothing' if you've overclocked *at all*.

    In overclocking, there are inherent risks. The very fact that you're playing with voltages and cycles translates into playing with fire - literally. More voltage = more heat. I can't stress enough the importance of proper temperature monitoring and some real good CPU cooling as well as excellent case cooling.

    ASUS has a nifty little utility called PCProbe2 that comes on the CD that came with the motherboard... USE IT. I also found that CoreTemp gives a very close reading with the A8R32-MVP Deluxe.
    If your temps at *any* time reach into the mid 50*C range, STOP and readdress your CPU and case cooling before continuing any further. (Mid 60*C is the upper limit, but we don’t need to push it, right?)

    There are loads of good aftermarket CPU cooling options out there...I personally have the Thermaltake Big-Typhoon, and I'm very pleased with not only it's performance, but it's sound level as well. There are some good people whom I'm sure will chime in on this thread that have purchased the Tt V-1 cooler (uh erm...ProfBP ;) ) - Apparently, this one-ups the Tt Big-Typhoon in cooling efficiency at the cost of just a db or two...indeed a very small price to pay for more than adequate cooling!

    All in all, by the very nature of overclocking, you need to know that you're taking a risk of exposing specific components to more voltage/heat/cycles than they're designed to take, which *could* or *may not* lead to their early or eventual demise.

    I'm sure most people that will read through all that crap already understand the risks...it's just pertinent for me to say...I can't be held liable for any kind of overclock gone wrong.

    Alrighty then...

    Some here's some terminology that we're going to be familiar with by the end of this post:

    AMD's HT: HyperTransport (HT), formerly known as Lightning Data Transport (LDT), is a bidirectional serial/parallel high-bandwidth, low-latency computer bus. The HyperTransport Technology Consortium is in charge of promoting and developing HyperTransport technology. The technology is used by AMD and Transmeta in x86 processors, PMC-Sierra and Broadcom in MIPS microprocessors, NVIDIA, Via, SiS, ULi/ALi, and AMD in PC chipsets, Apple Computer and HP in Desktops and notebooks, HP, Sun, IBM, and IWill in servers, Cray in supercomputers, and Cisco Systems in routers.

    HyperTransport runs at 200-1400 MHz (compared to PCI at either 33 or 66 MHz). It is also a DDR or "double-data-rate" bus, meaning it sends data on both the rising and falling edges of the 1400 MHz clock signal. This allows for a maximum data rate of 2800 MTransfers/s per pair. The frequency is auto-negotiated.

    HyperTransport supports auto-negotiated bus widths, from 2 (bidirectional serial, 1 bit each way) to 32-bit (16 each way) busses are allowed. The full-sized, full-speed 32-bit bus has a transfer rate of 22,400 MByte/s, making it much faster than existing standards. Busses of various widths can be mixed together in a single application, which allows for high speed busses between main memory and the CPU, and lower speed busses to peripherals, as appropriate. The technology also has much lower latency than other solutions.

    So, in a nutshell, HT is the bandwidth used between your memory and CPU and the CPU and other peripherals. (this one never *needs* to be higher than 1000MHz in one direction (which is 2000MHz effective))


    AMD's HTT: (HyperTransport Technology (HTT) - I know, confusing!!!) The A64 has no FSB (or Front Side Bus) as we know it. That's because the memory controller is built-in to the CPU rather than being on the motherboard. Basically, HyperTransport replaces the FSB.
    So raising the HTT is how we raise the CPU cycles...it's the amount of communication a CPU can push in a given amount of time.


    CPU Multiplier: The CPU multiplier is one way for processors to run much faster than the clock speed of the motherboard or RAM allows. For every tick of the front side bus (FSB) clock, a frequency multiplier causes the CPU to perform x cycles, where x is the multiplier.
    For example, if the FSB has a clock speed of 200 MHz and the CPU multiplier is 10x, then the processor would run at 2.0GHz.
    One downside of the multiplier is that it only increases CPU speed. In the previous example there is a multiplier of 10x, but RAM still runs at 200 MHz, so the computer can only access memory at 1/10th of the processor speed, 200 MHz, the speed of the FSB. Because of this, many overclockers prefer to have lower multipliers with higher FSBs.


    Memory Divider: One popular way of overclocking your processor is to increase your FSB. This increases the processor bus, and memory bus equally. In the event that your processor still has the ability to increase in speed, but your memory is maxed out, you would use the memory divider to slow down your memory. Example: You want to run your FSB at 200Mhz, but your memory maxes at 100Mhz. Set the FSB to 200Mhz, and the memory divider to 1/2, and the memory will run at 100Mhz. (primitive example, but you should get the idea) – the point here is that running a memory divider *literally* runs your memory at a fraction of its original speed…this is a good thing as we’ll learn later.


    Now, we're off to a running start:
    First of all, here's AMD's overclocking equation: (You're going to want to print all this out - this is easy once you know it... I promise!)

    (CPU Multiplier * HTT) = CPU Frequency
    (CPU Multiplier / (memory divider) ) = Divisor Ratio (ALWAYS ROUND UP TO THE NEXT INTEGER!!!)
    (CPU Frequency / Divisor Ratio) = RAM MHz (* 2 = DDR MHz)
    (HTT * HT Driving Strength) = HT MHz

    (on the divisor ratio line, there’s a specific note to round up, this means when you have *any* decimal value, even if it’s below 5, please round it UP!)

    Memory Dividers shown as decimals for the above equation: (put the decimal in the (memory divider) spot in the second line above)

    200MHz (400) = 1/1 (1 / 1 = 1)
    183MHz (366) = 9/10 (9 / 10 = .9)
    166MHz (333) = 5/6 (5 / 6 = .83333)
    133MHz (266) = 2/3 (2 / 3 = .66666)
    100MHz (200) = 1/2 (1 / 2 = .5)

    HT Driving Strength info (this is just relevant information for your AMD/ATi HT it's called "HyperTransport" & it's a function or 'bus' of the motherboard) - your HTT (that's attached to your CPU multiplier) multiplied by the HT Driving Strength Multiplier below = your motherboard's true HT MHz speed (they're interlocked 'busses')
    (i.e. 200MHz HTT multiplied (*) by 5 = 1000MHz HT)
    1000MHz = 5X
    800MHz = 4X
    600MHz = 3X
    400MHz = 2X

    OK, with all that fresh in your mind, we're going to use the math equation for an easy and quick lesson (less any voltage adjustments - that all comes later...we just want to show how the math works and get familiar with it.

    (12 * 200) = 2400MHz
    (remember? - that was your CPU Multiplier times your HTT MHz)
    (12 / (1)) = 12 (nothing to round since it was already a whole number)
    (remember? - that was your CPU Multiplier divided by your Memory Divider shown as a decimal, then rounded to the next higher whole number)
    (2400 / 12) = 200MHz (* 2 = 400MHz DDR)
    (remember? - that was your CPU Frequency from line 1 in the equation divided by the sum of line 2 in the equation)
    So, you can see your DDR400 RAM sticks are actually running at stock 400MHZ speed.
    (200 HTT) * (5X HT) = (1000MHz HT)

    So, here's the math again without all the verbiage (and so you can get used to the way it looks and works) :

    (12) * (200) = (2400)
    (12) / (1) = (12)
    (2400) / (12) = 200 (* 2 = 400)
    (200) * (5) = (1000)

    We're lucky. I have proven the A8R32-MVP Deluxe capable of 1500MHz HT - where most boards out there struggle to attain 1100MHz HT! But again, just because my A8R32-MVP Deluxe *will* run at 1500MHz HT doesn't mean that yours will...don't get that set in your head. And, another thing on HT: as long as you're close to the 1000MHz mark with the actual HT speed (after doing the math of multiplying HTT and the HT multi) - you're just fine...going over 1000MHz doesn't give you a performance INcrease per se, and decreasing it to below 800MHz doesn't give you a performance DEcrease at all...just best to use the math to stay near the 1000MHz mark.


    Now then, here is what I do when beginning a new overclock:
    (We're going to try to find the limit for your motherboard's HTT)


    Drop the CPU Multiplier to it's lowest setting
    Drop the HT Link Speed to it's lowest setting
    Drop the RAM divider to it's lowest setting


    Begin by raising the HTT (CPU Frequency) in 5 - 10MHz increments - rebooting to POST (Power On Self Test - it's the very first screen of text in black and white that you see when you first start your computer from an OFF state) in between each change - until it wont POST (Power On Self Test) - note the number as you've just found your motherboard's maximum HTT. This is important, as your motherboard really is a major determining factor on just how far you can overclock your CPU/RAM and other peripherals. (we’re lucky, our A8R32-MVP is proven stable at 400HTT, but not *all* of them will do that, and most other boards won't even come close!!)

    Drop it down to a comfortable stable level decided on from the equation above.
    (yep, we're going to be using that equation *a lot*, so just get used to it!!!) - I'm going out on a limb by saying I'd try for the 280 to 300MHz HTT range...assuming your maximum HTT is high like mine was at 400MHz.

    Raise your CPU Multiplier (using the equation) to no more than 10X, reboot and see if it will POST with the HTT from above...if not, reduce the HTT *OR* raise the voltage in .1V increments until it will, keeping in mind to keep an eye on the CPU temperature...DO NOT GO HIGHER THAN 1.55V!!!

    (this really becomes nothing more than a balancing act at this point - and it takes time...have patience, take breaks - if you get too frustrated, stop for 10-15 minutes and do something else in a different room...I'm not kidding! I've been soooo close to putting my foot all the way through my case that it's not even funny, so I *know* what I'm talking about - TAKE BREAKS! - oh, and try not to drink alot of coffee ;) )

    If you've made it this far, you've just found a *comfortable* level from which to work...now the hard part begins!

    Raise ALL your RAM latencies to 3-4 notches above stock - in your case, straight down the list from my BIOS linked here: My A8R32-MVP BIOS Breakdown
    3,13,6,6,6,12,13,5,15.6,9.5,12, 2T
    Leave your voltage where it is (don't go higher - the BIOS text goes red for a reason!) - Later on, you can adjust it up to 2.85V, but you will not need it to be even .01 higher - the XMS aren't rated for higher voltage, and with them specifically, that's usually the point of diminishing returns.
    Now, starting with the SECOND one (tRAS), drop it one notch and reboot to POST (and I *mean* [1] notch at a time - you do more than that, you'll find yourself resetting your CMOS twice a much as you're already going to!!!!), repeating until it will not pass the POST, clear the CMOS if you have to, and raise that one value one notch.
    Do the same for ALL the latencies (rebooting to POST in between EACH AND EVERY CHANGE) - leaving tREF at 15.6, Read Preamble at 9 and ASYC Latency at 10 (just don't go lower on those for now...)
    This is a *very* long and arduous process, but the benefit will be more than worth the effort you put into it!
    Once you've made it this far, try changing the CMD ADDR Timing to 1T and see if it boots all the way into Windows - if not, change it back to 2T or loosen up the last 7 timings (all at once) and set the CMD-ADDR Timing to 1T and boot into Windows - if it doesn't do it, just leave that SOB at 2T and call it good. (this can really be a deal breaker for you - it's a gamble on high MHz with tight latencies and loose 2T CMD or high MHz with loose latencies and tight 1T CMD- with the tight latencies along with 1T CMD being optimal on both sides - for the most part though, a 1T CMD with *fairly* tight other latencies beats more than *fairly* tight other latencies with a 2T CMD rate. (get that? - I might have confused myself....it's getting late for me ;) )

    After you've found all the lowest latencies for the *comfortable* overclock, you can begin to see if there's any more...
    By raising the CPU voltage, (NEVER HIGHER THAN 1.55V) you can increase stability in your overclock - but it comes at a great price - HEAT. If your CPU gets above 50*C under full load (should be in the 30-35*C range for idle - but load temps are the most important!), you need better cooling, or need to settle on an overclock that utilizes less voltage (which means less HTT and/or higher multiplier and maybe even a different divider)
    If your temps are good (~50*C or below at FULL LOAD) then you can start experimenting with the Overvolt option. By enabling the +100mV option, you're effectively giving your CPU .078V more (ASUS has a bug in their overvolt - it's not really .1V as measured with a multimeter, it's more like .078V and the +200mV is more like .174V instead of .2V) - So, you can see that if the mobo tops out at 1.5V for your CPU (ASUS voltage regulator - it's a good thing for people that don't know what they're doing!) - by enabling the +100mV Overvolt, you're effectively giving the CPU ~1.58V, and with the +200mV, it would be roughly 1.67V - Again, WATCH YOUR TEMPS!!!

    Now, last thing you'll have to test is your HT link speed...most motherboards aren't capable of much over 1000MHz (1000MHz in EACH of 2 lanes is what it really is, but we only talk about one direction when we speak of it in the BIOS...on the motherboard box it says 2GHz - 1000 up and 1000 down) - BUT, I have proven the A8R32-MVP Deluxe stable at just over 1500MHz (1500up AND 1500down) - there isn't a motherboard out there aside from ours that is capable of that! - But, they all differ...I've seen some A8R32-MVP's that struggle to reach 1100MHz, and another that is barely unstable at 1600MHz - and everything in between.

    You'll want to use the equation above to find out where you *should* be, and then use the equation to see if you can go the next step higher (i.e. 3X to 4X to 5X) - you'll know when it's not stable at that speed when it BSODs (Blue Screen Of Death or reboots instantly). - For now, try to keep it at around 1000MHz and after you're comfortable with testing further, try it.
    The secret for getting a higher MHz throughput out of the HT is because of the chipset and the options for it.
    I enable the Overvolt to 1.5V for ALL the Northbridge options, and enable the Overvolt option for the Southbridge as well...it helps in the stability for higher bandwidth - But you've GOT to pay attention to your motherboard temp now! Mine's sitting at 35*C right now, and doesn't really get much higher - this is due to adequate case cooling, which I suggest you definitely follow up on!!! (since the Northbridge on the A8R32-MVP Deluxe is passive, it really relies on good airflow around it to keep it cool! - if at any point you feel uncomfortable about the NB reaching into the mid 40*C range, you may want to check into an active cooling, or perhaps just removing the HS assembly and replacing the ASUS thermal gunk with a nice fresh layer of Arctic Silver5 or Ceramique)

    Here are some links to software that you'll need...you probably don't need it all as a few are redundant and overkill, but here they are nonetheless.

    I'd DEFINITELY pick up OCCT, Orthos, SuperPI, CPU RightMark and RMMA from the Benchmarking section, *everything* from the Monitoring section, then A64Info or A64Tweaker from the MISC section...and if you're feeling brave, get ahold of SysTool from the MISC section too - but don't go getting all adventurous with that one just yet! ;)

    Benchmarking Software:
    OCCT Perestroïka
    Orthos StressPRIME 2004
    SuperPI
    SiSoft Sandra
    CPU RightMark
    RMMA
    RAMTester
    and then of course the FutureMark line of PC and GPU benchmark products - but I'd only get PCMark for this...and really, only if you want to.
    MaxPi is a newer version of SuperPi coded for multiple core processors, and a relatively new addition to this list - it gives some interesting results, but a certain drawback is that it's written in Russian...(personally, I will use it once in a while, but when testing if what I changed in BIOS is better or worse for number crunching, I'll still use SuperPi - it's quicker and gives results in a language I can understand!)


    Monitoring Software:
    ASUS PCProbe 2
    CPUz
    Everest 4
    AMDClock


    Calculators and MISC tools:
    RMGotcha
    A64Info
    A64Tweaker

    Be CAREFUL with this one:

    SysTool
    (This one will do pretty much everything that alot of the others do combined - but it will also write values to specific registers on your motherboard that your motherboard doesn't support (like voltages and memory latencies/dividers/etc.) - you can actually damage your motherboard and other components with this if you don't know what you're doing, but nonetheless, this is an indispensable tool that I use every time I overclock with the K8 or earlier anymore.

    Ok, now that I've completely overloaded you, go print this out and give it all a shot. I expect you to take notes of what works and what doesn't (imagine writing a book from start to finish without scratch paper or notes!!!) - seriously, the only reason I even have all this information is because I wrote all the math down...what worked, what settings pushed it over the edge, literally EVERYTHING...and it's lead directly into posts just like this one!

    Holy CRAP. Good luck...I just realized I wrote a TOME in one single post!!! (I'm always long-winded, as many here will testify, but DAMN! I think I outdid myself! ;) )

    Psychlone
     
  3. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Tome is a good word for all that... Really interesting stuff, though. I didn't have a chance to do hardly anything today. Work and exhaustion... Anyway, I did go through all my BIOS settings, especially the main ones: Jumper Config, CPU Config, Memory Config, and the Chipset. Everything booted per most changes that I made tonight which included:

    -Changing burst length to 8 beats under memory, under chipset I changed CPU-NB Width to 16 bit, RD580 Strength to optimal, HT Receiver to Optimal, and HT PLL to High speed (sorry for abbreviations) :)

    -Under PCI Config I changed only 2 things: P2P Writes to DISABLED, and 10% current to GFX2 to DISABLED

    -Changes I made that didn't work were all under the jumper config:

    -VCORE OverVolt to 200mV
    -CORE Volts to +1.4V
    -HT Bus Volts +1.4V
    -PCI-E Volts +1.4V
    -PEG Link Mode to AUTO

    These were the only changes attempted tonight. If I need to wait till the overclock is completed to make these changes, let me know, but I did think these alterations would not compromise system stability... apparently one of those 5 did.

    That's all for tonight... tomorrow bright and early I'll experiment with that change barring someone tells me to negate them ALL, and begin finding my max HTT

    cupper24
     
  4. JimmyFox

    JimmyFox Master Guru

    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    2x ATi Radeon HD4830 CF
    Ah the A8R32-MVP Deluxe.... The best s939 mobo with PCIe I 've ever had. Fast and Stable...

    Anyway, here are some tips you may need.

    1) Update to the latest BIOS (although I 'm sure you have). The Original BIOS was an overclocking nightmare.

    2) ATi Xpress3200 is an excellent chipset that can handle HyperTransport Bus >1300MHz and PCIe Frequency >110MHz. Check this out -> http://pdftown.com/pdf-ebook/Overclocking_Guide_CrossFire_Xpress3200.pdf
    It's the official overclocking guide buy ATi.

    3) Always leave HT multi to 5x to have the best possible performance. Overclocking (with RD580) isn't affected by the HT bus frequency.

    4) Always have in mind that A64 works best with 1:1 DRAM ratio. For example, it's better to be 10x270MHz with 1:1 than 9x300MHz with a RAM divider (although this also depends by the divider and the HT frequency, you will decide that).

    5) Most s939 "Toledo" need quite a lot of voltage. To get the most of your CPU you may need to up the CPU Voltage to 1.6V, which is pretty high. I hope the Big Typhoon you have can handle the heat.

    6) PCI-e voltage doesn't have to be high. Default should work fine or just a notch up.
    Also, disable the PEG Link.

    7) Try to set the Command Rate to 1T. 2T is more stable but 1T is pretty faster. My Samsung UCCC loved 1T and didn't overclock better with 2T. Try it. Memory bandwidth will be considerably improved.

    8) For some strange reason, RD580 seem to work better and faster when TRAS is set to 11 or 12. Setting TRAS to 11 or 12 helped me to overclock my RAM better without deteriorating the performance. Actually, it was improved! Maybe it was because of the UCCC chips I used, but try it, it may help you as well.

    Last but not least, here are my settings ->
    http://www.pctechnology.gr/vbull/vb/showpost.php?p=288667&postcount=86

    Hope I helped.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2008

  5. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Was it really worth setting the voltage that high for a gain of only 2.5GHz? Or were you using the x2 4400+ Toledo?

    I'll take a look at that guide... Thanks for the read.

    cupper24
     
  6. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    I found my maximum HTT to be 360 with the HT link speed and multiplier set on low. :(

    I got the multiplier to boot at x10 w/ no problem. Also, The thing finally started POSTing with everything I tried to change last night enabled, like the over-voltage sttings.

    Which brings me to my next point... The BIOS has me capped at 1.40V from the Processor Voltage option. I tried keying the number in at 1.5V, tried +/-... nothing. But, strangely enough, with my proc @ 2.80GHz the voltage in the Power Settings reads 1.552V. If that's right I guess I'm good.

    The BIOS reads my processor @ 45C, but that is the throttled temp too, right? Hope so, because things'll be getting toasty in there for sure.

    I'm on my wife's laptop for internet access, because something tells me I shouldn't be trying to boot to my OS right now :). Anyway, I took a long break. But, I'm ready to get back after it.

    Finally, my TRAS which I read you said works best at 8 for you boots up @ 5. Should I leave it for noe, and just go through the rest of my latencies and worry about it later?

    Thanks as always

    cupper24
     
  7. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    ??? RAM divider?

    I went ahead with the latency step, and every single one except for TRWT (next to lowest) booted with the lowest possible settings. That's all well and good, but I think there may be a missed step being that my RAM divider is still at its lowest setting. I didn't see anywhere in the read at what point I'm supposed to tinker with that again. I read through it 3 more time to be sure. Since I probably (maybe definitely) won't be raising my HTT any further, if not another 5 to 10 MHz, that's not going to get my RAM OC'd. Should I have done this before jacking with my latencies?

    cupper24
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2008
  8. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    VCore

    I am running 1.4V @ 34C idle :D

    I upped my divider to 166 (5/6 or .83333), so at 285MHz HTT and a x10 multi gives me 233.3333= 234 or 468 DDR. I am currently testing my latencies at this divider. Will I need to adjust voltage on this step if the system fails to post?

    I am getting most of this, but the three parts HTT, Memory, andd HT Link... how are they connected exactly? I read the HT link can hold back the HTT overclock, and that CPU Multi can hold back the memory overclock... do you suggest lowering the multi while testing latencies, or does leaving it alone yield a more realistic overclock? Like I said, I get the jist of the whole thing, but connecting all the dots is sketchy if you know what I'm saying...

    cupper24

    BTW, do I run memtest86 at the completion of each individual latency?

    Thanks in advance...
     
  9. Psychlone

    Psychlone Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    1
    GPU:
    Radeon HD5970 Engineering
    Sorry cupper24 Bro...went to Vegas for a couple days and just got back...

    @JimmyFox: While I have to agree with a couple of your points, I have to disagree with some too...
    Leaving the HT at 5X just because it's stable at >1300MHz doesn't mean that it's going to be stable at at a high HTT - like 360... (360 * 5X = 1800MHz) - you know that isn't going to work. But, if you can't run a high HTT, say over 260, then 5X is just fine - but the entire intention here is to squeeze every last bit of performance out of the system, and being a beta tester of this board and knowing it inside and out, I know that the higher HTT you can attain, the faster throughput and higher bandwidth that's available to you.
    Also, I have to disagree on your 1:1 RAM theory. I've tested many, many different RAM setups, and in *every* scenario, higher MHz *always* wins more bandwidth than simply 1:1 with tight latencies...bar none. - I'm still getting 583MHz at 3,4,4,10 @1T out of my DDR 400 (almost the same exact sticks that cupper24 has) with (from Everest's Memory and Cache Bench)
    READ: 8110MB/s
    WRITE: 8246MB/s
    COPY: 6510MB/s
    LATENCY: 48.3ns
    (these are on par or better than DDR2 800) - there's no way that DDR400 running 1:1 at 400MHz is going to pull that off...I've tested dozens of brands and it hasn't happened yet (well, not until you get into the K10 and DDR2 architecture)
    Lastly, your tRAS at 11 or 12 was probably due to your RAM sticks...I do know there were threads around a year ago (maybe longer) that was trying to prove how the memory bandwidth was affected by the tRAS latency, but even tRAS falls in the same category as every other latency: the LOWEST latency supported by the HIGHEST MHz attainable. (and of course, there's always some balance in there somewhere - perhaps 12 was yours...11 seemed to be mine, and a buddy of mine's was at 15)
    All your other points were spot on. Please JimmyFox, don't take my reply to you as criticism...rather just know that I have a lot of experience with the A8R32-MVP Deluxe as well as overclocking in general (been doing it for over 15 years) and have learned a couple tricks along the way (literally hundreds and hundreds of hours of nothing but testing). Nothing that I've retorted to in your post is meant to be negative or demeaning in any way to you. I do appreciate your effort to help out cupper24 understand what's what in this ever-challenging environment of overclocking.




    @cupper24:


    Alright, I'll try to answer in the order that you asked.

    From POST 3 (although some if it may be a moot point, I'll still try to explain the why's)

    1) Burst Length at 8 is good so far - but you may have to change it to 4 down the line (just letting you know)
    > RAM with a burst length of 4 can be used to transfer 8 bits of data per wire by performing two read transactions in succession,but this requires twice as much address and bandwidth control to initiate the two requests.
    When this feature is set to 4, a burst transaction can only comprise of up to four reads or four writes. When this feature is set to 8, a burst transaction can only comprise of up to eight reads or eight writes.
    As the initial CAS latency is fixed for each burst transaction, a longer burst transaction will allow more data to be read or written for less delay than a shorter burst transaction. Therefore, a burst length of 8 will be faster than a burst length of 4, but there is a point of diminishing returns here - if your RAM is MHz capped because the Burst Length is set to 8, then you'll not be able to raise the MHz higher, which is *always* better than 'faster' (it will make up the difference and then some by raising the MHz!)

    2) P2P Writes Disabled and 10% extra to GFX2 is just fine - unless you're Crossfiring 2 ATi cards, at which point BOTH need to be set to ENABLED for best performance (at no cost to your overclock, but no need to run them at all if you're not Crossfiring)

    3) All the voltage settings that you made didn't do anything for you...just a bit of 'jumping the gun'. You don't need to raise any voltages until you find out each component's maximum values - and *especially* don't need to enable any Overvolt options (for CPU or the NB) unless you're trying to find each of their maximums, and may not even end up using them in your finished overclock.

    From POST 6

    1) A 360MHz HTT is very respectable, and there's no need to worry about it. Some of that is tied to the CPU that's in the socket when you try for it's max...my Opty 165 apparently allowed the 40 extra MHz (and if you think about it - 40 extra MHz isn't really that much - and unless you're going to run an 8X CPU Multi, I doubt you'll be up in the 360 range anyway (remember the math? 8 * 360 would put you at 2880MHz - and we haven't made it that far into it yet.) - so for now, don't worry about 360, again, it's tied to the processor in the socket and your CPU isn't going to require a 400MHz HTT (in fact, I'm still running my Opty at 356HTT for the 3.2GHz I'm pulling from it!)

    2) I'm not sure where you're going with the 10X multi...if you were just following my BIOS settings, don't. The point is (when trying to find the CPU's max multi w/ the board's max HTT - and that's down the road when you start putting it altogether) to try to POST at the HIGHEST CPU Multi that's available (what is your's anyway, 11X? - let me know on that)

    3) Voltage on the CPU is going to be capped depending on what CPU is in the socket. ASUS has a voltage protection built-in the board and won't let you apply waay to much voltage to the CPU and let you just pop it. But, that's what the Overvolt option is for. +100mV is really adding .078V (NOT .1 like you'd think!) and +200mV is adding .174 (NOT .2 like you'd think!) - BUT, you don't need it unless you're trying to find your CPU's maximum, and may not end up using the Overvolt anyway.

    4) BIOS shows *mostly* load temps - but it's not really an indicator of 'Full Load' temps...don't judge where you're at by looking in the BIOS. Check your idle temps and full load temps using CoreTemp or ASUS PC Probe2 (on the disk or from asus.com)

    5) tRAS is part of the latency tweaking, and you're not even close to that yet...latency tweaking is the LAST thing you do...put that off for a bit.

    From POST 7

    1) You're way ahead of yourself at this point. Leave your latencies alone for a while - we'll get there later. But, it's good to know that you've probably got some good Micron ICS on those C2 Platinums...that means a better overclock than you're buddies! ;)

    2) The RAM divider should be left at it's LOWEST divider (100MHz) until you find your other maximums (max HTT, max HT) - I purposely left out when you should raise it because this is where it gets to be really critical to speak to me (or other Gurus 'in the know') about latency tweaking...leaving the memory at it's literal SLOWEST speed removes it from the math equation, allowing you to focus on the other tasks at hand (which is finding the maximum values of the HTT and the HT)

    3) Since I have *no* idea what settings you're running, I can't give *any* advice on what to do next...I've got no idea what you've tried and what maximum values you've discovered (aside from your HTT's max of 360, which only helps me 1/3 of what I need from you)

    From POST 8

    1) 1.4V at 34*C idle is nice (expected from the Tt Big-Typhoon) - BUT, what are your FULL LOAD temps? Nice idle temps are good to look at while you're surfing the net, but don't do *any* good for anything else (well, maybe bragging rights in an arid climate, but nothing else) - it's ALL* about the full load temps! (please, when you get done reading this, post your settings first (I'll supply you with a template to fill out) and then after reading my advice on your settings, please, please, please run OCCT for 15 minutes and tell me what your FULL LOAD temps are - that's what's really important!!!)

    2) You're doing the math correctly, and it's really refreshing to see some really good DDR400 sticks pumping 468MHz at stock latencies (if indeed that's where you are) - but again, you've jumped the gun on the RAM part - you need to loosen everything up to very slow latencies (higher numbers) and leave it all there until you post up the completed template...

    3) Busses:
    From the tome, but in different wording (I hope, there's really only a couple ways to word this) - your HTT, Memory and HT are all linked directly to each other, meaning that when you raise the HTT, you've effectively raised ALL of them. So, if you think about it, there's just no way to run a 360HTT (your board's max HTT) along with a 5X HT (remember, 360 * 5 = 1800MHz, and that's *not* doable!) - as well as your Memory (remember, (cpu multi / memory divider = divisor ratio) and then (cpu freq / divisor ratio = RAM MHz) - so at 10X (just assuming that's your CPU Multi) at 10X, and also assuming no memory divider, it would look like this:
    10 * 360 = 3600
    10 / 1 = 10
    3600 / 10 = 360 ( * 2 = 720MHz DDR) - and that's why that ain't gonna happen!
    Again, when you raise the HTT, *everything* that's attached to it (the HT and the memory) raises with it...this is why we are given an HT Multiplier (the HT Link Speed) in the form of a MHz value (remember from the tome, 1000MHz = 5X, 800MHz = 4X, 600MHz = 3X and 400MHz = 2X assuming a 200MHz HTT !!) and also why we are given Memory Dividers (remembering that they make RAM run at a fraction of their original speed, so you can increase the HTT)

    4) I *promise* we'll get to the RAM latency tweaking part...but you haven't even reset your CMOS from overclocking everything else too far yet - you're so far from latency tweaking that you need to slow down and focus on 1 thing at a time, and leave the latencies completely alone until we're ready for them. Please. (I swear that I'll explain in detail how/why/when/etc. when we get there, but for now, there's far too much work to do on the other components to even think about something as daunting as latency tweaking!)

    Alright, now you get to fill in the template. Please be thorough and fill in EVERYTHING that I've listed, directly from your BIOS. This is going to be a good exercise for 2 reasons: 1st, you'll get more familiar with your BIOS and it's settings, and 2nd (and probably most importantly) you'll get familiar with writing all this stuff down for future reference (again, from the tome, imagine trying to write an entire book from memory without the use of scratch paper or any notes to keep your storyline intact...you'd end up in nowhere real fast - or you'd have a crap book that no one could make any sense of!!! ;))

    ADVANCED
    _Jumper Free Configuration
    _AI Overclocking__________________Manual
    _CPU Frequency___________________
    _PCIE Frequency__________________100

    _FID/VID Change__________________Manual
    _Processor Frequency Multiple________
    _Processor Voltage________________
    _DDR Voltage____________________
    _VCORE Voltage__________________
    _Northbridge Overvolt_____________
    ___Core Voltage__________________
    ___HT Bus Voltage________________
    ___PCIE Voltage__________________

    _PEG Link Mode___________________Auto
    _PEG Buffer Length________________Auto

    _AI Clock SkewA__________________Auto
    _AI Clock SkewB__________________Auto

    _CPU Configuration
    _GART Error Reporting______________Disabled
    _MTR Mapping____________________Continuous
    _Cool N Quiet_____________________Disabled
    _HT Link Speed___________________

    _Memory Configuration
    _Memory Timing Mode_____________Limit
    ___Memclock Value_______________
    _MCT Timing Mode________________Manual
    ___CAS (CL)_____________________
    ___TRAS________________________
    ___TRP_________________________
    ___TRCD________________________
    ___TRRD________________________
    ___TRC_________________________
    ___TRFC________________________
    ___TRWT________________________
    _MCT Extra Timing Mode____________Manual
    ___TREF________________________
    ___DDR Input Strobe Skew_________Disabled
    ___Burst2Opt____________________Disabled
    _User Configuration Mode___________Manual
    ___Read Preamble________________
    ___Asyc Latency_________________
    ___CMD-ADDR Timing_____________

    _Bank Interleaving_________________Auto
    _Burst Length____________________
    _Software Memory Hole____________Disabled

    _ECC Configuration
    ___DRAM ECC Enable______________Disabled
    ___L2 Cache BG Scrub_____________Disabled
    ___Data Cache BG Scrub___________Disabled

    _Chipset
    ___VGA Priority___________________1st PCIE ->2nd PCIE

    _HT Config

    ___HT Link Speed_________________
    ___CPU:RD580-NB HT Link Width____16 Bit

    ___RD580 HT Link Three State_______Disabled
    ___RD580 HT Drive Strength_________AUTO
    ___HT Receiver Comp. Ctrl__________Optimal

    ___RD580 HT PLL Control___________High Speed

    _PCI-E Configuration

    ___PCIE GFX1 Link Width___________X16
    ___PCIE GFX2 Link Width___________X16

    ___P2P Writes Between GFX Ports___Disabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX__Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GPP__Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between SB___Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX1_Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX2_Disabled

    (please fill in every line that's not already got a value, and ensure that all the lines above that DO have values are the same in your BIOS)
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  10. JimmyFox

    JimmyFox Master Guru

    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    2x ATi Radeon HD4830 CF
    Of course not my friend. I am experienced enough to understand that every setup is different and behaves accordingly.

    Anyway, I had pinpointed that TRAS etc settings were because of my RAM and also noted that the optimal settings depend of many parameters (divider and RAM etc)

    From my experience with all A64 generations (754,939,AM2) I understood that 1:1 ratio is always better. Of course 1:1 means that there is linear rise of the RAM clock and the "FSB" (HTT). Meaning that a DDR400 RAM with 1:1 and "FSB" @ 265MHz will be clocked @ 530MHz :

    <a href="http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=7b0p3ll7r5q7902lafvu.jpg"><img src="http://www.imageshack.gr/files/7b0p3ll7r5q7902lafvu.jpg" border="0" alt="Free Image Hosting" /></a>

    My A8R32-MVP Deluxe couldn't reach the clocks that you had (300+MHz HTT) plus my 4400+ Toledo could go as high 2660MHz stable. Your RAM was also better than mine and you had more headroom for overclocking.
    So the best combination for me was to go 1:1 keeping tight RAM timmings with 1T and a high HTT bus.

    Unforunately, I don't have this mobo anymore to perform new tests but as long as I remember I had ~31.5s @ SuperPi and ~46s @ PiFast (4400+@2650MHz RAM@265MHz (530MHz effective) ant HTT@1327MHz)
     

  11. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Ok, where to begin:

    -everything I did was per the tome. Drop HT link to lowest, as well as mem divider and CPU Multi. Begin finding max HTT by starting at 200 moving up 5-10, reboot, if it POSTs, repeat. Do I need to d*ck with my voltage setting in the HTT step, or wait til the mutli step? OK read through and answered that for myself... voltages come at multi stage. Speaking of the multi, I simply stopped at 10, because the tome says to go to no more than 10, figure there was method behind the madness here :D. But, my multi goes all the way to x25.5!!! Yea, so I'm not going to dream of the unless my system is submerged in liquid nitrogen :funny:

    I figured out the voltage inquiries from yesterday's posts while fiddling.

    Next, on to why I went to memory tweaking.... it was the next step in the tome after finding the multi, and the HT overclock was the last, so I went to memory tweaking due to lack of a reference point (I think JimmyFox's guide goes in this order, too). But, anyhow, many thanks for clearing that up :thumbup:

    So, finally, once I establish the max HTT, I will continue to the multiplier stage... then do I need to boot into Windows and test load temps and such BEFORE tackling HT link Speed? I assume that now is the next step in all this... but, like I said, this is the point where I'm hazy....

    Last, but not least, I've been a good grunt and took notes on everything I changed, touched, smelled... I just forgot to post it all. WHOOPSIES! Anyways, I will do that for sure. Many thanks for the template. I assume you want that AFTER I find HTT and Multi, right? Oh, and to be clear... You and others have really hit home the point that I can't just mirror set-ups and why that is, etc. So, just to make sure, I won't even do that in desperation (in response to why I used x10 multi and no more) :)

    EDIT: Crap, one more thing... should I loosen timings while finding HTT and multi to 3-4 notches above spec?

    cupper24
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  12. Psychlone

    Psychlone Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    1
    GPU:
    Radeon HD5970 Engineering
    First off, apologies for the 10X CPU Multi thing...this guide was written some time ago, and at that time, the guy I was helping had a 3400+ (or maybe a 3700+ - can't remember) - and I was working with my Opty...mine topped out at 9, his at 10, and somehow I missed that one thing in all the iterations that this guide has gone through (I've added to, changed and removed from it many times, but it's kept it's original integrity)
    You don't really need to use your CPU's highest multi, since you get more bandwidth from the higher HTT (which means that you have to LOWER the Multi to reach the higher HTTs anyway)

    Alright, in answer to your other questions above:
    Establish the maximum HTT, then the maximum HT. Then bring your CPU Multi up to 10 or 11...doesn't really matter because you're going to be limited by the CPU at a high HTT or HT anyway, plus, the 10X multiplier makes for easy math! - oh and on that, NEVER use a half multiplier...not only makes the math hard for us, AMD doesn't like half multipliers (9.5, 10.5, etc.) - seems it makes the math hard for them too! ;))

    Good job on taking notes...it pertinent to remembering where you are, because when we get to latency tweaking, you're going to reset your CMOS more times than you want to remember, which entails re-doing your ENTIRE overclock every time you reset...and without notes, you best have a photographic memory!!! :D

    Alright, as for loosen timings before finding max HTT, no, that's overkill, you need only to have your memory at 100MHz...(think of it this way, at 100MHz, 1/2 speed, you've dropped your memory out of the equation - it's not going to cap on you before the HTT or HT or CPU does when it's running at .5 speed.)

    K...get to work on that template! :cool:

    Psychlone
     
  13. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Right now I'm running x10 multi w/ 300MHz HTT. Should I try to find the max HTT this thing can achieve w/ x10? Also, no overvolt enabled right now. I'm sitting at 1.42V.

    ADVANCED
    _Jumper Free Configuration
    _AI Overclocking__________________Manual
    _CPU Frequency___________________300
    _PCIE Frequency__________________100

    _FID/VID Change__________________Manual
    _Processor Frequency Multiple________x10
    _Processor Voltage________________1.400V
    _DDR Voltage____________________2.75V
    _VCORE Voltage__________________Disabled (for now)
    _Northbridge Overvolt_____________Enabled
    ___Core Voltage__________________+1.4
    ___HT Bus Voltage________________+1.4
    ___PCIE Voltage__________________+1.2

    _PEG Link Mode___________________Auto
    _PEG Buffer Length________________Auto

    _AI Clock SkewA__________________Auto
    _AI Clock SkewB__________________Auto

    _CPU Configuration
    _GART Error Reporting______________Disabled
    _MTR Mapping____________________Continuous
    _Cool N Quiet_____________________Disabled
    _HT Link Speed___________________200MHz

    _Memory Configuration
    _Memory Timing Mode_____________Limit
    ___Memclock Value_______________100MHz
    _MCT Timing Mode________________Manual
    ___CAS (CL)_____________________2.0
    ___TRAS________________________6
    ___TRP_________________________3
    ___TRCD________________________3
    ___TRRD________________________ Auto
    ___TRC_________________________ Auto
    ___TRFC________________________ Auto
    ___TRWT________________________Auto
    _MCT Extra Timing Mode____________Manual
    ___TREF________________________7.8 us
    ___DDR Input Strobe Skew_________Disabled
    ___Burst2Opt____________________Disabled
    _User Configuration Mode___________Manual
    ___Read Preamble________________5.5 ns
    ___Asyc Latency_________________7.0 ns
    ___CMD-ADDR Timing_____________1T

    _Bank Interleaving_________________Auto
    _Burst Length____________________8 Beats
    _Software Memory Hole____________Disabled

    _ECC Configuration
    ___DRAM ECC Enable______________Disabled
    ___L2 Cache BG Scrub_____________Disabled
    ___Data Cache BG Scrub___________Disabled

    _Chipset
    ___VGA Priority___________________1st PCIE ->2nd PCIE

    _HT Config
    ___HT Link Speed_________________200 MHz
    ___CPU:RD580-NB HT Link Width____16 Bit

    ___RD580 HT Link Three State_______Disabled
    ___RD580 HT Drive Strength_________Optimal
    ___HT Receiver Comp. Ctrl__________Optimal

    ___RD580 HT PLL Control___________High Speed

    _PCI-E Configuration
    ___PCIE GFX1 Link Width___________X16
    ___PCIE GFX2 Link Width___________X16

    ___P2P Writes Between GFX Ports___Disabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX__Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GPP__Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between SB___Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX1_Enabled
    ___10% Extra Current Between GFX2_Disabled

    I'll wait till you look at these before going on....:)

    cupper24
     
  14. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    BTW, won't POST in x11 at max volts, 1.552V. Not too worry, just FYI. Don't want to decrease HTT for higher mult anyway.

    Goin to get some lunch, brb...

    cupper24
     
  15. Psychlone

    Psychlone Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    1
    GPU:
    Radeon HD5970 Engineering
    HOLY CRAP!!!! DON'T be doing suicide runs like that (unless you're looking for a reason to purchase a new CPU) !!!!!

    Alright...I've got a bit of work to do here, so give me a little while...I should be back later on this evening.

    Psychlone
     

  16. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Cool just let me know if I need to be running any stress test software before I move on to upping HT link Speed.

    Accidentally booted into Windows, but I let it go.....Took FOR-ever!

    Note to self: NO MORE SUICIDE RUNS! :)



    cupper24
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  17. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Update:

    Since I'm kinda at a stand-still on my OC, I began looking over my case cooling again. I didn't think there was still enough adequate airflow, especially in the top left quadrant where the CPU lies. (Trust me, I'm kicking myself for not thinking of this sooner) I have been trying to think of ways to get my side fan to become useful again. I looked at modding my side panel with some careful measurements, a rotary tool, and a pocketful of dreams... Well, that never materialized... So I take my side panel off to inspect the airflow inside, and it dawns on me that the window is perfectly square and EASILY accessible. So, I unscrewed itrotated it and flipped it. Now, it's sitting over the expansion slots instead of directly over the TBT, so I stuck my 80mm fan back on it, and away she goes, a few degrees cooler than before!

    Idon't feel very much flow from my front case fans, even with my hand about 2-3 in away from them (2 80mm fans side-by side). There's enough space in the cage to stick a 120mm fan and I can purchase an air tunnel to focus the air on my GPU. I'm going to get a 80mm to 120mm adaptor, screw some new fan holes next to the pre-existing ones (to get it in the middle), and that should do the trick. I also have some high-powered 80mm exhaust fans in mind to help match up the CFM on the in-and-out, so I can run all at the same speed and be done with it. I've also tossed around the idea to seal my case by putting tape on the vent holes (This case has tons: on the side, in the back, on the other side... ) and let the fans do the work. If I keep it slightly positive (the Setup I'm thinking of nets a +8 on the intake.

    Do I need to bring the PSU fan into consideration here? Mine does not have the rear fan.

    Here's a pic:

    http://i277.photobucket.com/albums/kk48/cupper2008/DSC00859.jpg

    without flash:

    http://i277.photobucket.com/albums/kk48/cupper2008/DSC00860.jpg
     
  18. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Tried running OCCT... Got a Code 1 Crash message within the first 15 mins.... Load temps according to ProbeII never exceeded 47C, and the proc was under 98.57% load. Is this a stability issue (e.g. do I need to apply more volts some where?)

    cupper24
     
  19. Psychlone

    Psychlone Ancient Guru

    Messages:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    1
    GPU:
    Radeon HD5970 Engineering
    The reason you got errors is probably cause you're pumping 3GHz right off the bat - we build up to that! ;)

    Alright...let me see...
    Try the changes above in RED and post back to let me know.
    I'll be at my restaurant for the rest of the night, so if you need some speed in your system for anything, just revert back to stock settings and leave it till we can address the situation.

    This is the math for the above:
    10 * 280 = 2800
    10 / .83333 = 12.0000004 (so round UP to 13!)
    2800 / 13 = 215.38 (* 2 = 430.77MHz DDR)
    4 * 280 = 1120MHz HT

    This should put everything right where we can work on fine-tuning...if it's not stable there after running OCCT or Prime95, then ENABLE the Overvolt option for th VCORE and set it to +100mV, test for stability again, then if it's still not stable, set the HT Overvolt options like so:

    _Northbridge Overvolt_____________Enabled
    ___Core Voltage__________________+1.5
    ___HT Bus Voltage________________+1.5
    ___PCIE Voltage__________________+1.2
    ...and try again for stability...just whatever you do, if it's not stable here, then there's only 3 things you can do:
    1) increase the VCORE Overvolt option to +200mV (remembering that it's really .174V and not .2) - and watch your load temps!!!
    2) increase your memory voltage to 2.9V (but DO NOT go higher!) - and only do this if option 1 fails OCCT or Prime95
    3) DECREASE the HTT by 10MHz (to 270)
    ...tell me where you're at after this and wait for further instructions.
    Remember, if you need some speed before then, and since some of your components are running at minimal speeds, simply reset to default BIOS settings (you can just clear the CMOS for a quick and easy way) and off you go at default settings, which should be fine and get you through till I can attack this tomorrow or maybe even late tonight.

    Good luck!

    Psychlone
     
  20. cupper24

    cupper24 Master Guru

    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPU:
    HIS 6950 2GB (860/1300)
    Thanks... will do, bro

    BTW, my bad for not posting this...again. I had the HTT at 285 when I ran it, because I too was leary about 300... Sorry

    cupper24
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008

Share This Page