Asus 2011-3 & Intel warranty issue?

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by fantaskarsef, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    I hope I haven't missed a thread about this, but just in case anybody wants to know:

    As I've read, there might be warranty issues with those oc sockets that Asus chose to put on some of their boards, the Rampage V Extreme among them.
    Because those sockets have more pins (2048 iirc) than the standard, 2011 pin specification for the latest sockets, the actual use of such mainboards with Intel's new Haswell-E CPUs would mean they are operated out of officially approved specifications.
    Long story short, even if you don't oc your Haswell-E, you might lose your warranty with the Intel CPU. So technically, as long as you use such an oc socket board, it doesn't even matter if you overclocked your CPU, you lose your warranty the moment you put it in. Asus, on the other hand, has confirmed they keep up their warranty for the mainboard itself and by it's own.

    I, personally, don't get the idea behind it much. Why does Asus release such mainboards without any approval of Intel? Why does the CPU have contacts for such unofficial pins? Is it part of the cut-down Xeon thing?

    As most of the users here would most likely oc their Haswell-Es no matter what, there should be little practical impact on them. But if anybody wanted to keep their new CPU at stock, he might want to consider this. In the article linked below, the German site advises to personally go to your store and try to make them agree to a signed deal that they would take care of any RMA (and probably replacing a CPU) when used under the designed voltage and clocks, as in not overclocked. But of course, there's no way you could force your hardware dealer to sign that without a big piece of luck on your side.


    Found here, pcgameshardware.de. It's an article in German, and as they proclaimed, they have official info on Asus's warranty and it's unchanged status.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2014
  2. Fender178

    Fender178 Ancient Guru

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    Hmm interesting. There are other x99 boards out there so that makes me wonder how they are designing their boards compared to ASUS. Also I think we need more information from both Intel and ASUS.
     
  3. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    As far as I'm aware of it, no other manufacturers have implementes such a socket with more than 2011 pins for the Haswell-Es (I checked the Gigabyte SOC, some ASrock boards, and whatever you want to give much about it, the MSI X99 Gaming 9's manual).

    Are you planning to run you Haswell-E with stock clocks? Because, if you want to overclock, this information practically doesn't apply to you (or anybody else overclocking), since they (we hehe) lose our CPU warranty anyway.
     
  4. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Is there any way to find out what other asus boards are doing this?
     

  5. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    As there are three Asus mainboards offered on their official site, all of them (Rampage V Extreme, X99 Deluxe, and the X99-E WS) have those sockets with additional pins. It's what they call "exclusive oc socket" in the Rampage's description on the homepage, as seen on the Rampage's product page, if you click on "overclocking armory".
     
  6. Agent-A01

    Agent-A01 Ancient Guru

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    Asus X99 Rampage Extreme V
    Asus X99 Deluxe
    Asus X99 Pro
    Asus X99-E WS
    Asus X99-A

    Anyways, apparently it utilizes the extra pins for better OC stability
     
  7. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    I guess that more or less sums up to all Asus X99 boards, no?
     
  8. War child

    War child Master Guru

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    Well apparently ASUS have the patent on this so I'm not sure how other boards will try to utilise the same features without patent infringement.
     
  9. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    Still the question remains: does it really help with stability? That can only be found out by lots of reviewing and testing, mainly on the consumer's side.
    Also, just in case anybody wants to run his 5960X or similiar at stock clocks and voltage, they might want to opt for another manufacturer. I'm just curious if Intel is considering legal steps against Asus, if there are any possibilities to do so at all.
     
  10. Agent-A01

    Agent-A01 Ancient Guru

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    They cant take legal action? Intel designed the CPUs with extra pins for a reason. ASUS was the only one to find out that they added more pins.
     

  11. Fender178

    Fender178 Ancient Guru

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    no I wasnt going to purchase Haswell-E but I was just commenting on the situation. Also if this might be true I bet both Intel and Asus will get a ton of heat. Especially Asus since they designed the board. Also this might make people think twice about purchasing an Asus x99 board.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2014
  12. -Tj-

    -Tj- Ancient Guru

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    Well Asus and Intel are like head and neck
    https://www.google.com/search?q=asus+and+intel

    http://www.ocaholic.ch/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=813

    that's why Asus made this in the first place cause they know all intel tricks,
    Same thing now with Z87 mobos, Im sure Asus will be the first to support Broadwell on Z87 :p


    I found them extra pins very interesting, its mostly for LN2 and it shouldn't affect normal cpu scenario. Imo its probably just some bad PR for Asus mobos by other competitors :devil:
     
  13. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    Well, up until now, I've read feedback weakening any negative vibes on Intel's side. These days it reads more like "This CPU socket is not like the specification we make." Which doesn't say anything else about warranty, or even if it's considered to be an operation out of guidelines like OCing.

    Asus also has said they guarantee the Haswell-Es working with it, so I guess if it doesn't, and you can prove it was used with a X99 Asus board, they will have to replace your CPU anyway, if you didn't overclock.

    Maybe you are right TJ, maybe there was some bad PR from the competition, maybe Asus and Intel themselves brought this rumor into existence, because all publicity is good publicity, and silly me might have just fallen for it ;)
     
  14. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    As a bit of information, Gigabyte has adopted this socket too on their SOC LN2 board, as I've read on German hardware site pcgameshardware.de. Although they use the same socket, they state that likely the uncore frequency should be better, yet voltage doesn't really increase. Whatever those bits of information are worth it, there is a pciture of it on there (with a comparison to the normal SOC non-LN2 version).
     
  15. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    This thread is nothing but scare mongering. Processor warranty will not be voided by the use of these boards unless you go into UEFI and enable the use of the extra pins for overclocking. This has already been confirmed.
     

  16. Fender178

    Fender178 Ancient Guru

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    I agree. This is nothing more than a scare tactic.
     
  17. fantaskarsef

    fantaskarsef Ancient Guru

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    Interesting. I didn't know that you had to activate those pins through bios. Did anybody official confirm that the warranty wasn't voided from Intel's side?
    Just some information I thought would be helpful in deciding which board to get, if you're for overclocking it's interesting to go with those mainboards anyway, knowing that those pins could help.
     
  18. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    Yes, it has been confirmed. Asus has stated that the pins are disabled in the UEFI configuration by default and must be enabled by the user. As long as they're disabled, they have no impact on the processor warranty. If the user decides to enable the pins, the processor warranty will be void. Coincidentally, the processor warranty is void if you choose to overclock anyway so it's still a non-issue and this is nothing more than scare mongering.

    Pcgameshardware.de should have done some actual research prior to posting their article to scare people away from Asus. You should have also done some research prior to starting this thread.
     
  19. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    It's funny how intel doesn't warranty againt overclocking on K processors, but yet they offer a protection plan for overclocking said processors. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2014
  20. sykozis

    sykozis Ancient Guru

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    If you pay for said protection plan, they will warranty it so long as you don't intentionally push the processor to insane voltages/clocks. That's the purpose of the protection plan. To cover overclocked K processors in the event of failure while operating within otherwise safe limits.

    Of course, seeing as how Intel didn't intend for those extra pins in the Asus OC Socket to exist, you'd have to contact them in regards to whether or not the processor protection plan would still cover a processor after those pins are enabled.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2014

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