3dlabs cards - any good for games?

Discussion in 'Videocards vs General Purpose - NVIDIA Ageia PhysX' started by jobo, Nov 19, 2004.

  1. jobo

    jobo Active Member

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    Leadtek 6800GT 256mb
    I've got an IBM Intellistation which seems wickedly fast, due to SCSI drives and RAMBUS RAM - certainly seems on a par with my Athlon2000XP system, despte only an 866 processor.

    I've seen that it normally might take Oxygen or Wildcat graphics cards (and appears to have requisite AGP Pro slot), which come up on ebay from time to time. I'm wondering if these would be any good for games, if not why not, and how do they compare to "consumer" graphics cards (which are of course aimed at games).

    Part of reason I ask is that I had some 3D versions of quake that would not run right on a Banshee, which seemed to be down to OpenGL not being fully implemented (presumably in the 3dfx driver). 3dlabs stuff seems to sell on being a full h/w implementation of OpenGL, so might be better (if only for this purpose). Any views?
     
  2. Dr. Vodka

    Dr. Vodka Ancient Guru

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    oxygen? no very old. wildcat ( insert card model here)?? maybe... but if it´s some fast that comp, why not a tnt2-gfx-- these cards are better than the 3dlabs cards... maybe using agpX- they would work, or in PCI mode...

    3dlabs cards arent meant for gaming, they are for professional use... for gaming use a gfx, or only for very limited gameplay, buy a tnt2 or a geforce 256... or buy a new comp it´s better than that
     
  3. stormbind

    stormbind Guest

    Creative Labs sell WildCat AGP cards about the same size of a mainstream card. They play games fairly well, but (a bit like Matrox) are targetted more at video editing.

    3DLabs did eye the gaming market a couple of years ago with a chip - I think - they call VP10. It could have outdone NVidia but I'm under the impression that it wasn't cost effective, hence why you only see the cards I already mentioned above.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2004
  4. kv3d

    kv3d New Member

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    Proling GFX6600GTagp
    I own a VP870, (VP10).I would advise you to stay way from this card if you intent to play games.Some games are supported some others run with problems
    and some aren't running at all like age of empires and cossaks.Its not half good as is a much earlier nvidia card ,even in opengl.
    Its better than a newer gaming card for 3dsmax and opengl based 3d programmes
     

  5. jmBoekestein

    jmBoekestein Guest

    I've got a VP 870 too,

    I was trying to play the demo of Doom3 just now and instantly decided I need to upgrade!
    I'm unsure of Maya performance though, but I'm under the impression that the geforce 6800 series will perform very well in hardware rendering mode, and at least it will support all the functions and actually start, I hope.
    I'm going to buy a 6800 LE and unlock and overclock everything straight from go.
    What also fell to my attention for those interested is that ati cards do support anti aliased lines so they might also support other high end requirements. However, having forked out as much cash for a wildcat I am inclined to go for a decent card that outperforms anything on the market now, or I'll make a fuss, I swear.
     
  6. Glidefan

    Glidefan Don Booze Staff Member

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    Yeah Maya 6 loves the 6800 ;)
    And you can use the "High Quality" real time display with a good speed.
     
  7. jobo

    jobo Active Member

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    Right about Wildcat

    Thanks for these replies. I got hold of an old Wildcat 4000 - two huge cards and a 4 inch wide ribbon cable in between. The AGP card is just very long, the PCI card completely fills the case (had to unscrew the metal fin on the end to get it in my case). 80MB, of which 64 is textures and 16mb is frame buffers. The drivers have lots of settings - things like stereo, interlaced displays, etc. Even detects my monitor is DDC.

    But it's no good for games - Quake 3 won't run sensibly above 800x600 and even that has a low frame rate, plus there are rendering glitches (sporadic hatching ahead of fills).

    I replaced it with a 64MB Voodoo5, which is outstanding by comparison - runs Quake 3 with all the settings on maximum, no problem. But to be honest even a 32mb Voodoo4 was better than the Wildcat.

    Still not sure I understand why there should be this difference, but then I am not a video card designer.

    But there's still something compelling (for me) about running these sorts of games on "industrial" hardware, glitches and all...
     

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