3770k Discussion thread - Heat Posible improvement!

Discussion in 'Processors and motherboards Intel' started by Bloodduty, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. Bloodduty

    Bloodduty Master Guru

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    Right this one is a good one but will void the warranty

    I cut off the little heat sink off the CPU with a scalpel and under it was what I would call a biscuit for paste absolute rubbish

    Photo is going up the night

    After testing some paste i got the temps on stock to min 18oC to 20oC and max 46oC to 47oC not sure an the ambient

    Before I did this, I was getting min of 32oC to 34oC and a max of 63oC to 66oC

    Have to say it was worth voiding that CPU


    Photos and more info ill put up to night as i am at work lol
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2013
  2. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    Nice one. I have one to do myself but haven't actually put the system together yet.

    What paste are you using as replacement? I'm going to go with the liquid metal TIM.
     
  3. Agent-A01

    Agent-A01 Ancient Guru

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    Dont use it on the CPU die unless you want it to blow up. Use Prolimatech pk-1 or gelid gc extreme
     
  4. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    Are you sure? I'm certain I read others using it and getting great results.
     

  5. alanm

    alanm Ancient Guru

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    Be careful not to cut too deep. :)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    The pic below is 3770k with the IHS taken off. I took mine off and replaced it with PK-3 and hot glued the IHS back on. It cut my load temps almost in half. I personally wouldn't use the Liquid Metal TIM directly on the CPU die because it's electrically conductive. I do know people that use it and have no problems, but there will always be that chance something might happen vs a TIM that's non conductive.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2012
  7. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    The top of the CPU die is a non conductive coating isn't it?
     
  8. BlackZero

    BlackZero Ancient Guru

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    Ouch!
     
  9. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    That's not a 3770. But yeah ouch indeed!
     
  10. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure on that.
     

  11. BlackZero

    BlackZero Ancient Guru

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    I assume they mean in case it gets spread too much and on to other parts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  12. SLI-756

    SLI-756 Banned

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    The liquid metal would seem the best option but with the melting process i've always been put off, but yeah how the hell do we put it back on (doesn't the mobo cpu lever keep it in place?), do we need to glue it back on like PhazeDelta1 done?
    Also wth that pic in spoiler is an instant put off, the components are so close to edge! -edit that's not an ivy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2012
  13. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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    The die is tiny in surface area compared to the actual socket size. Very little chance of that I would have thought.

    Also having already experienced using it, it spreads very thinly and I didn't see any excessive creep on to other areas.
     
  14. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    No you dont need to glue it back on. It just makes it easier when you install the cpu into the mobo.
     
  15. SLI-756

    SLI-756 Banned

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    Cheers, kinda wishing i had done this sooner now, once i get another heatsink cooler i'll be set.
     

  16. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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    There's a video on YT that shows how to remove the IHS and all that. If I come across it again, ill post it.

    forgot I had that video saved

    http://youtu.be/XXs0I5kuoX4
     
  17. hallryu

    hallryu Don Altobello

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  18. BlackZero

    BlackZero Ancient Guru

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    Yeah, unless you are very clumsy, it's unlikely to spread on to other components. It's probably not as fiddly as screwing on a heatsink can be at times.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  19. PhazeDelta1

    PhazeDelta1 Moderator Staff Member

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  20. yasamoka

    yasamoka Ancient Guru

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    I see that Liquid Metal TIM as a hassle to use. First of all, it's most probably Gallium based, so it leeches into metals, even copper, and it will be harder to remove as time passes. As I have read, it makes your cooler either perform worse with another application (if done improperly), or perform worse with other thermal pastes (which sounds logical as there are now two thermal interfaces between the heatsink and the chip). Now you're applying it to the CPU die, but what if you need to reapply or change pastes? I'm not saying that it WILL give worse performance, but it might.

    Plus, it's electrically conductive, so if you do make a mistake and get it somewhere it shouldn't be, it would give you quite some trouble to remove it.

    Third of all, if it comes into contact with Aluminum, it attacks it (eats it up). The CPU die under the IHS is not copper, and I reallly hope it's not Aluminum in case some unlucky fellow used that Liquid Metal in there and watched his CPU die being eaten up :D

    And for what? A couple degrees difference (3 at the most), you get a syringe which barely gives a couple of applications, needs more precision than others, is risky, and bonds permanently with the cooler (CPU die in your case).

    There may be undesirable effects as time passes, if the CPU die is not as shielded well with the used metal. The IHS is there to protect that chip. It certainly doesn't provide more surface area for heat dissipation, as most of the heat transfer occurs across the area of the IHS in direct contact with the CPU die.

    I recommend you just go for Arctic MX4 or any thermal paste that you deem appropriate and has good enough performance for your application. Non-metal, non-conductive, spreads well, inexpensive, 4g and 20g tubes, no cure time, no need for reapplication every once in a while, easy to remove, etc...it certainly gives me peace of mind... I use it on everything (CPUs, GPUs, laptop CPUs & GPUs, netbooks, maybe my phone as well ;))
     

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