Guru3D.com Forums

Go Back   Guru3D.com Forums > General > Links
Links Archived stickys.



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old
  (#26)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 01-08-2005, 01:14 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

I'd assume just put them in a single loop, say chain the GPU to CPU to radiator. This will mean your CPU will be a bit hotter, but I believe perhaps on a degree or two. Going pump->GPU->Radiator->CPU->Radiator might alleviate it, but would be more expensive and require a stronger pump.

I've seem pictures where they used a "Y" connector to connect the second waterblock, but seems a little iffy to me... don't have any solid proof of that, though.

6800 waterblocks aren't cheap, unfortunately, I've only seen two and they're both over $100.
   
Reply With Quote
 
Old
  (#27)
ninebreaker4
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 2x GIGABYTE 7800GT's @stock
Processor: AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ @2.6Ghz
Mainboard: ASUS A8N32-SLI Deluxe
Memory: 2x 512MB CORSAIR XMS3200XL C.2
Soundcard: 8CH REALTEK ALC850
PSU: ENERMAX 535W
Default 01-10-2005, 15:37 | posts: 94 | Location: Botswana

HMMMM..............some useful info, i think its time for me to move to watercooling
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#28)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 01-15-2005, 09:41 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

For anyone thinking of making the leap, I'd just keep in mind that watercooled systems are still ultimately air-cooled. It isn't the water that cools the CPU but the air that blows over the radiator, the water just moves the heat from the heat source to the radiator. If nothing was cooling the water it would eventually simply heat up to the same temperature as the CPU. The water presumbably helps to distribute the heat more evenly throughout the radiator then in a conventional heatsink, but the big advantage of watercooling is that you can have a much larger radiator then you could a heatsink, since you can mount the radiator anywhere inside the case or even outside the case, whereas a heatsink must be physically attached to the CPU on the motherboard and cannot be too large for that reason.

A larger cooling surfact will result in better and/or quieter cooling. For this reason you really don't want to bother with a system that doesn't have at least a 120 mm radiator, because otherwise you may end up with a watercooling system that is not much better (or even slightly worse) then a high-end heatsink that will likely still be significantly cheaper.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#29)
diehrd
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 6800 BFG O/C
Processor: Xeon 2.4 MO @ 3676
Mainboard: Asus
Memory: 1 gig OCZ 3200
Soundcard:
PSU: Water cooled
Default 02-13-2005, 13:40 | posts: 50

Just an adjustment to the origional post.

QUOTE: Component Notes:
Despite popular myth, the order of your blocks will make little to no difference on your temperatures, so it is best to just put them in the order that is most convenient for you. The best system order is as follows: Pump-->Blocks-->Radiator-->Resevior-->Pump. Having the radiator or res right after the pump, will kill your flow rate and pressure, so always put them at the end.

This is incorrect,The max flow is a closed loop is determined by the most restrictive item in the loop.It does not matter where this item is located because the loop is closed.

Additionally people often think running in Series ( Block to block) Makes the water warmer in the second block compaired to the first.Not so because the water is in contionos motion the temp from CPU block to GPU block if measured would be almost identicle.

Flow is the single biggest factor in removing heat from the heat sources,As is Air flow across the core,It is in these 2 areas that the biggest resulat are achieved,Usually the easiest way to get lower temps is with a larger rad and or more air flow across the rad..And typically the best blocks offer a better flow rate compaired to a cheaper block...
   
Reply With Quote
 
Old
  (#30)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 02-14-2005, 17:44 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

I'll agree on point one, but not so sure about point two--it seems like the water would have to be a bit warmer if the first waterblock is removing heat effectively. I do know that adding a GPU block seems to raise CPU temperatures by only a degree or two, though, so the difference is certainly minor, if that's all you mean.

I'm actually curious if there is an advantage to using two T-fitting to connect two waterblocks instead of a large, single loop. Then water would flow from the pump, then branch out to the two waterblocks, then join back together and hit the radiator.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#31)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 02-14-2005, 17:46 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Just noticed this review of a swiftech watercooling kit with 120 mm radiator. This is a good example of a basic mid-range kit for enthusiasts who want to overclock. It also illustrates all the components of a watercooling system for anyone still unclear on the concept.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/oth...h-cooling.html

You can contrast it with the other two kits here, which are still quite decent but I'd venture closer to entry-level kits.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/oth...cooling_8.html

Edit: Looks like Corsair is now reselling this same kit, looks to be a bit cheaper even.

http://www.corsairmicro.com/corsair/COOL_water.html
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#32)
diehrd
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 6800 BFG O/C
Processor: Xeon 2.4 MO @ 3676
Mainboard: Asus
Memory: 1 gig OCZ 3200
Soundcard:
PSU: Water cooled
Default 02-14-2005, 18:37 | posts: 50

You are asking good questions and I dont want to post a scientific reply but I all most have to so before i do lets try to explain..

First the water is in Motion constantly and going from cpu to gpu if you had a temp moniter between these blocks the water temp difference would amount to approx .3c a very very small temp difference ,in fact so small it is not even worth worrying about.

You re asking me if setting a syaten up in a parallel circut will result in lower temps. And the answer is 99% of the time no UNLESS you specifically get products engenered to proivde better cooling in that type of set up.

The most important factor in a closed loop is maintaing a High flow rate and when you introduce Y connections T connections or many loops you are creating drag and a reduction of flow.

This is the easiest way for me to put this,But the more water you push through the blocks and rad the cooler the temps of the procesor and Gpu.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#33)
Pon
Master Guru
 
Pon's Avatar
 
Videocard: Pixelview 6600GT
Processor: Athlon64 3500+ Clawhammer @ 2650 MHz
Mainboard: MSI Neo2 Platinum
Memory: 1024 MB's El Cheapo RAM @ 2.5-4-4-7
Soundcard: Audigy 2 ZS with Logitech Z-3i Speakers
PSU:
Default 05-29-2005, 09:23 | posts: 182 | Location: Brisbane, Australia

I'm sorry, but the part about having two water blocks not raising temperatures much just seems illogical. If the GPU is running at the exact same temperature as the CPU, then twice the amount of heat would be absorbed by the water, thus doubling the temperature change.

If someone can prove me wrong (scientifically) then I would gladly like to see it.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#34)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 05-29-2005, 09:31 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Well I don't have a review handy, but I've seen some where they added a second block for the GPU and the CPU only seemed to get a couple degrees warmer, though this wasn't necessarily with some monster like the 6800 Ultra. I'll keep any eye out for something more compelling to link to, though...

-----

Oh well, here's something:

http://www.moddershq.net/reviews.asp...4&pagenumber=1

"I would like to think I have a decent cooling setup(dual 6 x 12 heater cores), however, my CPU temperature rose 10C during my benching session with the NV68 installed compared to when I only had the CPU block in the system. I have yet to fully determine if this affects my maximum CPU overclock, however, I would assume a 10C difference in core temperature is enough to warrant a warning: make sure you have adequate means to remove the heat this block takes off the 6800."

This is the description of his watercooler:

"Cooling wise, I have the JPI v5(external box to house 2 heatercores), the DangerDen D4 pump, DangerDen TDX water block, and stock cooling for my graphics card."

Which sounds pretty decent. So in his case, an overclocked 6800 Ultra heated up his CPU overclock by 10 degrees. Though an overclocked 6800 Ultra is surely a worst-case scenario.... I think its nearly like adding a second CPU.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#35)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 05-29-2005, 10:59 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Though just a thought... this does not necessarily mean the order of the blocks is important. It probably is a slow buildup to +10 degrees and reflects how much heat is being put into the loop and how much heat your radiator is capable of getting rid of, not how much heat the first block picks up on each pass to the second block. Presumbably the GPU block would drop 10 degrees if the CPU waterblock was disconnected as well.

For instance, scenario A would be to have the pump, the GPU block, then the CPU block, then a dual-120 mm radiator, then back to the pump. Scenario B would it be have a "T"-connector that split the tube from the pump to seperate tubes that go to each waterblock, then to each their own single 120 mm radiator, then join back together with another "T"-connector and then to the pump. The question is, would "B" result in lower CPU temperature then "A"... I suspect it wouldn't, or at least not to any significant degree, presuming the cooling capacity of the two individual radiators would not be better then the single dual radiator.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#36)
Pon
Master Guru
 
Pon's Avatar
 
Videocard: Pixelview 6600GT
Processor: Athlon64 3500+ Clawhammer @ 2650 MHz
Mainboard: MSI Neo2 Platinum
Memory: 1024 MB's El Cheapo RAM @ 2.5-4-4-7
Soundcard: Audigy 2 ZS with Logitech Z-3i Speakers
PSU:
Default 05-29-2005, 11:09 | posts: 182 | Location: Brisbane, Australia

Assuming that the two radiators removed as much heat as the dual-120mm radiator, then I suspect that B might perform slightly better, due to the fact that water loses heat not equally at different temperatures, but it is in fact a slight curve... If you know what I mean.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#37)
sonny
Newbie
 
Videocard: BFG 8800 GTX OC edition
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo E6600
Mainboard: ASUS P5N32-E SLI
Memory: 2gig Corsair 800mhz DDR2 4-4-4-12
Soundcard: Audigy 4 + Yamaha reciever + 7.1
PSU: Emory University Student
Default 05-31-2005, 08:35 | posts: 23 | Location: Atlanta

I'm going to expand on a few things. I have had thermodynamics at Georgia Tech. I'm an Emory University student but i took that as a summer class for my personal knowledge.

Some things to remember about liquid cooling.

First.

most important think other than the actually cooling unit ie CPU cooler etc. is the Radiator most specifically that the radiator is cooled. This is virtually the ONLY way to increase deltaQ aka heat transfer. Some noobs often talk about getting bigger tubing or faster pumps. DO NOT BE FOOLED this is a mistake. bigger tubing or faster pumps ONLY increases efficiency when the deltaQ of the radiotor is not being pushed to the limits. You may ask why this is. I mean at first glance you woud think i'm moving more water faster of the cpu shouldn't this decrease the temperature of the CPU? The answer again is only if the radiator is not being pushed to its deltaQ limit or heat limit.

Let me further explain.

Imagion that you are on the daytona 500 and lets just say its 1 miles to complete a lap. now lets say on a specific .3 miles your car runs cooler. now stay with me now...

If you travel 100mph on the track for one hour you will spend the same ammount of time on that particular .3miles of the track as you would if you went 50mph for 1 hour.

Therefore if the heat displacement of the CPU is higher than your radiator deltaQ the only way to increase performance is to upgrade your radiotor. now you can do this 2 ways. you can either get more airflow on the radiator to increase its deltaQ or you can get a bigger radiator with the same airflow as before only you will have to make sure the airflow is sufficiently spread over the radiator.

Liquid cooling is a great tool if carefully monitored and in the hands of a knowledgable user.

Anyway happy cooling

If anyone wants more information on this or needs better explaination just post and I will further explain myself.

For those of you who are familiar with DeltaQ DeltaQknot and Q* and would like for me to really get more into the thermodynamics again just post and I will be more than happy to do so.

~ Sonny
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#38)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 05-31-2005, 09:21 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Well, that's all fine and well, but its tough to say exactly when your pressure is already sufficient. There are also waterblocks that are meant to do better with higher pressure rather then lower (like DD RBX/TDX). Performance improvements with stronger pumps seems sufficiently proved, at least in some cases:

http://www.gruntville.com/reviews/wc...O_TT/page4.php

This is from a 3-block system, and the somewhat dinky Swiftech MCP350 doesn't hack it as well as the other two. Now if I was going to say that any part was the most important to cooling performance then I'd definately say the radiator, but I do not think you can neglect the others either.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#39)
sonny
Newbie
 
Videocard: BFG 8800 GTX OC edition
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo E6600
Mainboard: ASUS P5N32-E SLI
Memory: 2gig Corsair 800mhz DDR2 4-4-4-12
Soundcard: Audigy 4 + Yamaha reciever + 7.1
PSU: Emory University Student
Default 05-31-2005, 09:30 | posts: 23 | Location: Atlanta

Basically if you increase pressure / change pump speed / change hose size and you see an improvement that only means that the heat being generated from your components (DeltaQ) is less than the DeltaQKnot of the radiator. Basically the radiator is effectively transfering enough head to maintain near ambient temperature.

Problem with changing the pump speed / pressure is that if your radiator isn't alowing enough heat dissipation to reach ambient temperature than all your doing is heating up the watter then cooling it slightly in the radiator then moving the water faster back to the cpu and continuely heating the water beyond ambient temperature. For this reason I would hesitate to increase pump speed because if you are not allowing enought time for the water to cool to ambient temperature in the radiator then your are only doing harm rather than good.

This is more complicated then what I have just stated in short. when increasing speed you are also alowing for less time in the CPU block. this is where it gets sticky and the equations get rather messy. you have to deal with deltaH vaporization ( i know your water isn't reaching 100c but there is still an equilibrium that must be accounted for) oh i'm just going to stop here because I really don't want to complicate it any further...

Most of the basic water cooling systems supply a radiator far superior to that of the other components therefore you could change some of the other things mentioned and increase DeltaQknot.

Last edited by sonny; 05-31-2005 at 09:36.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#40)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 05-31-2005, 09:43 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Well, you said yourself that in an hours time the water will spend the same time in the radiator no matter how much faster the pump goes, so I would not agree with this.

You may be right about strong pumps not always or even usually being needed, but the problem once again determining when that is the case. Unfortunately, all the "science" in watercooling stays in the abstract, and there isn't some handy metric printed on all the components that tells you how strong a pump you'll need to not have low flow rate be an impediment. Its tough to draw strong conclusions even when there is a review, because a water-cooling system is made of up so many different components, you don't know how your mix along with the particular component being reviewed would change the results.

I think as long as the ideal flow rate is an unknown people might as well just spring for 1/2" ID tubes and $50-$75 pumps, since as watercooling is not a cheap business to begin with its probably better not to try to save $10 or $20 bucks when you'll shell out at least $200 anyway.

Though I would caution people who never expect to do more then a single block not to be too concerned with 3/8" ID tubing or a cheaper pump, especially if they have blocks known to do fine with low pressure (like Swiftech's new line). This kit's pump is fairly small yet the kit handles 250 watts fine in this review:

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/oth...h-cooling.html
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#41)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 06-02-2005, 01:48 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

These look like great kits for people in europe, looks like they sell direct:

http://www.1a-cooling.de/
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#42)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 06-16-2005, 21:40 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

On radiators. Besides the custom radiators from the likes of HWlabs, there is the alternative of automobile heatercores. The advantage is that they're cheap, and seem to be at least as good. I've been playing around with the general motors 2-199 shown here:

http://www.overclockers.com/tips1031/

And performance seems roughly the same as my HWlabs black ice extreme 2 pictured here:

http://www.hwlabs.com/products/blackicextreme2.html

The price advantage can be seen here:

http://www.dangerdenstore.com/produc...&cat=13&page=1
http://www.dangerdenstore.com/produc...&cat=14&page=1

Apparently you can buy the heatercore at an autoparts store for even less, though the DD offering does have the advantage of premodded fittings for 1/2" or 3/8".

The disadvantage is size, actually a bit larger than 2x 120 mm fans in the case of the GM 2-199, and mounting, as it was not made to mount 120 mm fans and thus has no holes drilled to accomodate them.

However, if you plan to put the radiator outside the case anyway, and don't mind a duct-tape shroud to affix the fans, then this is an excellent way to get a high-performance radiator on a budget.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#43)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 07-07-2005, 07:11 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Here's a good review of a TEC (peltier) waterblock, shows both installation and performance:

http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=Nzg5

Results here:

http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=Nzg5LDQ=

Looks like the 3.2 EE at 3.69 GHz was 8 degrees celcius with the TEC and closer to 58 degrees without, so that makes for a rather hefty 50 degree reduction. Also shows the benefit of adding a second radiator, went from one dual 120 mm thermochill to that plus a single 120 mm model--that reduced temperatures about 3 degrees celsius at the highest 3.96 GHz OC.

Of course, condensation results at these sort of temps, hence the insulation:

http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=Nzg5LDM=

Apparently another trick is to paint the area around the socket with silicon sealant, both for a bit more insulation and that if condensation does result there, it won't just immediately fry. Of course, you can't paint the whole board, so the benefit of this is presumbably limited. Though the condensation risk will only be around the bottom of the TEC and the immediate vicinity, everything else including the water will end up hotter.

Here's an example of the various TEC products:

http://www.crazypc.com/products/cool...ng.htm#peltier

It should be possible to use a TEC with any waterblock, as long as it uses springs to hold it down, as the TEC/etc. will increase the height of the waterblock. I believe the idea is waterblock->TEC>copper plate>processor. Foam is used around the assembly and socket on top, another block on bottom, and silicon sealant on the motherboard around the socket if you like as well.

TECs move heat, but they also add heat as well, and I believe you can expect the added heat to be equal to the wattage of the TEC. So if you use a 200 watt TEC, the hot side will have the heat from the processor/etc. (lets say 150 watts) plus the wattage of the TEC, so in this case 350 watts. This is an enormous amount of heat and requires a good watercooling setup, I'd say at least a dual-120 mm fan radiator or heatercore. This also put quite a bit of strain on the power supply, hence the supplementary power supply. Another option is to simply use a secondary PC power supply, but do a bit wiring so it is either always on or turns on with the primary power supply.

A TEC setup will not cool as well as a proper phase-change kit (prometia, vapochill), and will end up costing nearly the same amount (WC:$250,PSU:$100+,TEC/etc:$50+ = $400+). However, the advantage of a TEC setup over phase-change is that multiple blocks is no problem, whereas you would need a seperate phase-change unit per block. However, if you do use multiple TEC waterblocks you may want to limit the wattage of the TECs unless you're willing to buy multiple radiators, as each TEC can end up adding hundreds of watts of heat.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#44)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 07-25-2005, 01:43 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Well, I've discovered the magic of imageshack.us since this thread was started, so here are some much-belated pictures of my water-cooling rig:





What we have here is a Danger Den TDX waterblock, Hydor (AC) L30 pump, Hardware Labs Black Ice extreme 2, and 1/2" ID Tygon tubing.

The hole was cut with a dremal which can be had for about $40-$60 or so for a basic kit complete with some blades. The radiator is retained with rivots, for which you can buy a hand-tool which is quite cheap. I had to bore the holes for the rivots first, so a power drill is required as well. Long bolts would have worked as too and could retain the fans on the other side as well, as the metal fins of the radiator can be dislodged slightly where the bolts would go through without really affecting it.

I lost 2 drive bays in the process, though I recouped one by using it for a fan controller, which is only two inches in depth. I probably would have lost one but I mounted the radiator the wrong way, with the nozzles facing the front of the case. They extend the furthest, thus blocking the most drive bays.

The verticle tube going up the middle is called a T-line, its used for filling up the loop and bleeding the air out. I found out the hard way they're difficult to bleed unless located at the highest point on the case, but by physically manipulating the case I was able to fill it completely and get all the air out. The other alternative is a resevoir.

As I said an automotive heatercore is a great and much cheaper alternative to a PC radiator, but not with this mounting configuration. Mounting the radiator where I did means it must fit within the 5.25" drive cage, and the most popular GM heatercore it too wide by .5".

The other problem I had occured when I upgraded my 350 watt Antec PS for the PC Power and Cooling 510 watt. The latter was longer by an inch or so, and now collides with the radiator. This could have been avoided if I had had the forsight to mount the radiator further forward.

As you can see the pump blocks PCI slots. I can still fit my PCI pump relay card and ATI TV tuner cards in the bottom slots there, but anything more substantial would be a problem. Getting a full-tower case would be the surist solution to that little problem.

I have a single-block loop, as you can imagine multiple blocks in this space with this thickness of tubing could be a serious issue. The solution would be once again to get a larger case, or less ideally use thinner more pliable tubing.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#45)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 08-01-2005, 21:48 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Here's a good review that shows performance of several low-end kits:

http://www.a1-electronics.net/Heatsi...Wave_pg2.shtml

You'll notice that they all lose to the Thermalright SLK-948U, except an Aquarius 3 (over $200) which has been modded to include a second radiator.

So I think if you have $150 or less to spend, probably the best thing to do is get something massive such as one of these:

http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20050607/index.html

It will be cheaper than low-end water-cooling, and probably perform as well if not better.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#46)
thor1182
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 2x eVGA NV 6800 GT
Processor: AMD 64 4800+ X2 (FSB @ 226)
Mainboard: GA-K8NXP-SLi
Memory: 2GB Corsair XMS DDR400
Soundcard:
PSU: Koolance PC3-720 Case
Default 08-11-2005, 00:23 | posts: 51 | Location: Indy

This thread is a bit old, but who can resist a chance to show off their computer some more with some Photoshop touchup ?

Note: Key at end






Key:
Red arrows denote water flow.
1 & 2: 12mm radiator fans. (These fans draw air up out of the case and act like a chimney creating air flow through the case),
3: Water reservoir and pump assembly.
4 & 5: Push and pull water pumps
6: Radiator
7: CPU water block
8: Y-splitters, splits/joins the larger tubing line into two smaller lines to run through the GPU blocks
9: Video Card Water Blocks
10: GPU cooler
11: Video RAM block
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#47)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 08-11-2005, 00:36 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

No, that's perfect, especially how you labeled it all. This also illustrates nicely the different ways to hook up multiple blocks. So it looks like the tubing to the video card blocks is a different width. Is it 1/4" for those and 3/8" for the rest? Also, post you temps, I'm curious how it handles a 4000+ and 2x 6800 GTs.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#48)
thor1182
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 2x eVGA NV 6800 GT
Processor: AMD 64 4800+ X2 (FSB @ 226)
Mainboard: GA-K8NXP-SLi
Memory: 2GB Corsair XMS DDR400
Soundcard:
PSU: Koolance PC3-720 Case
Default 08-11-2005, 00:49 | posts: 51 | Location: Indy

off the top of my head your correct about the tubbing sizes.

With how everything is clocked now
GPU: 430 / mem: 1.14GHz

CPU: 2.625GHz / FSB 218 MHz
(Cool 'n quiet enabled)

Idle:
CPU: 36 +/- 1 C
GPU: Amb: 39 +/- C Core: 55 +/-

Load (after HL2 has been running for a bit)
CPU: 40 +/- 1 C
GPU: Amb: 43 +/- 2 C Core: 60 +/- 5
I'm not so sure on GPU temps on load becuase I don't check them much, but the CPU temp from the case sensor is right there in front of the case
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#49)
G L
Don Juan
 
Videocard: Leadtek 8800 GTS 640 MB 600/1000
Processor: Core 2 E6600 @ 3.2 GHz
Mainboard: Asus P5B-E
Memory: 2x 1 GB OCZ PC8500 @ 355 3-3-3-8
Soundcard: SB Live
PSU: Seasonic M12 700 watt
Default 08-11-2005, 00:54 | posts: 10,261 | Location: San Ramon, California

Ah, but water temp and CPU temp are two different things... what's the monitoring program say? Try speedfan (in the downloads section) if you don't have a decent one already.
   
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#50)
thor1182
Member Guru
 
Videocard: 2x eVGA NV 6800 GT
Processor: AMD 64 4800+ X2 (FSB @ 226)
Mainboard: GA-K8NXP-SLi
Memory: 2GB Corsair XMS DDR400
Soundcard:
PSU: Koolance PC3-720 Case
Default 08-11-2005, 00:58 | posts: 51 | Location: Indy

the prob sits right next to the CPU and touching the bottom of the cooler. When I compared the temp that the prob was reading to what my motherboard utility said they were withing a 1 degree margin of each other, so its pretty close.
   
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
Copyright (c) 1995-2014, All Rights Reserved. The Guru of 3D, the Hardware Guru, and 3D Guru are trademarks owned by Hilbert Hagedoorn.