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  (#51)
Saiyan
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Videocard: ASUS GTX 970 Strix 4GB
Processor: Intel i7 4790K
Mainboard: Asus Z97 Pro Gamer
Memory: 16GB G-Skill RipjawsZ
Soundcard: Realtek Onboard Audio
PSU: Corsair RM650
Default 01-11-2005, 20:46 | posts: 169 | Location: Belluno, Italy

Quote:
Originally posted by maarek99
Maybe, maybe not. You won't break anything. I got reduced stuttering from my emu soundcard. This is actually a pretty known trick especially for soundcard stuttering.
Okay, all non-zero-latency stuff now at 32, vid.card at 64. NFSU2 stuttering seems to be gone with filesharing in background.
Lookin' good!
   
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  (#52)
Cpt_Rio
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Default 01-11-2005, 20:46 | posts: 3

Do I have to run the program everytime I start my PC?
   
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  (#53)
Burnt_Ram
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Videocard: EVGA GTX 580 SLi
Processor: Core i5 @ 4.2 H20 Cooled
Mainboard: Asus P7P55D Deluxe
Memory: G.Skill RipJaw 1600 2x4GB
Soundcard: Via HD 7.1
PSU: Corsair HX1050W
Default 01-11-2005, 21:28 | posts: 5,926 | Location: British Columbia

Quote:
Originally posted by Cpt_Rio
Do I have to run the program everytime I start my PC?
no, set/apply tick run at windows startup, and your good to go
   
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  (#54)
{HLH}
 
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Default 01-11-2005, 21:34 | posts: n/a

as long as you click save when your done

it'll save the setting
   
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Old
  (#55)
Toxic Worrier
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Videocard: GTX 275
Processor: Phenom ll X4 955 BE ;)
Mainboard: DFI LP UT 790FX-M2R
Memory: 4GB-OCZ-DDR21066LV-Blade-
Soundcard: Asus Xonar D2X
PSU: PCPC 850 watt
Default 01-11-2005, 23:09 | posts: 938 | Location: Middle Georgia

Quote:
Originally posted by {HLH}
damn toxic.. you just lost us $90
Damn, dude you're expensive,,,,he he.....LoL

To the guy who asked about it running at startup, I wouldn't worry about it too much..It's already a registry setting that loads it and it uses hardly any memory to speak of. In fact, it loads at startup only to apply the setting. It isn't running in the background like a program or anything... ok ?? ok.
peace gentlemen................... good luck

Last edited by Toxic Worrier; 01-11-2005 at 23:21.
   
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Old
  (#56)
Toxic Worrier
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Videocard: GTX 275
Processor: Phenom ll X4 955 BE ;)
Mainboard: DFI LP UT 790FX-M2R
Memory: 4GB-OCZ-DDR21066LV-Blade-
Soundcard: Asus Xonar D2X
PSU: PCPC 850 watt
Default 01-11-2005, 23:18 | posts: 938 | Location: Middle Georgia

Quote:
Originally posted by Saiyan
Okay, all non-zero-latency stuff now at 32, vid.card at 64. NFSU2 stuttering seems to be gone with filesharing in background.
Lookin' good!
Hell yeah, That sounds like a weeener, I don't generally run anything in the background when Im running a game but I tried it with a Azureus, a .Torrent client running and I loaded up Vietcong, and then HL2 demo....Both games ran just fine..Maybe a tad slower....but these latency settings are much better than the default thats for sure....I ended up setting all of mine to 32 except the vid card I set to 128 like evga recommends, and I can't believe how much better hardware 3D sounds are sounding...Much cleaner.....A great tweak....Send your donations to toxicworrier@hotmail.com.


LoL.....I was joking dudes,,...."not".....hehe
later
   
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Old
  (#57)
bLaDe-HeLi[X]
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Videocard: e-VGA 7800GT CO SE
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PSU: Antec Sonata II 450w
Default 01-12-2005, 01:06 | posts: 16 | Location: B.C, Canada

Nice tool, thanks! I'm going to try 64 and 128, since I have a bfg 5900 and BFG tech support suggests that the latency be 128. I have a question though, should I change the "Pci Bridge (Normal Decode) Nvidia Corporation Nforce 2 AGP" to 128 or 64 as well? It's currently set at 225, please advise, thanks.

-b[X]
   
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  (#58)
ewitte
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Videocard: PNY 6800GT @ 400/1.1
Processor: Athlon 64 Clawhammer 2.2Ghz
Mainboard: DFI Lanparty 250gb
Memory: 1GB Mushkin PC3500
Soundcard: Audigy2 ZS / AL MX5021
PSU:
Default 01-12-2005, 03:52 | posts: 6

So far it looks like I'm allowed to turn "fast writes" back on. It was disabled because of stuttering. It helps things like WMVHD for me. I get a good 25+% drop in CPU utilization when fast writes is enabled. The T3 720p video without DRM ran at less than 10%

Eric
   
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Old
  (#59)
Toxic Worrier
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Videocard: GTX 275
Processor: Phenom ll X4 955 BE ;)
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PSU: PCPC 850 watt
Default 01-12-2005, 06:47 | posts: 938 | Location: Middle Georgia

Quote:
Originally posted by bLaDe-HeLi[X]
Nice tool, thanks! I'm going to try 64 and 128, since I have a bfg 5900 and BFG tech support suggests that the latency be 128. I have a question though, should I change the "Pci Bridge (Normal Decode) Nvidia Corporation Nforce 2 AGP" to 128 or 64 as well? It's currently set at 225, please advise, thanks.

-b[X]
Hmm, We have the same board but we have different video cards in that agp slot. Mine was set to 32...so I left it..I don't know exactly what the reason is for yours being set to 225. I would try 32 for the three settings right above the video card which is on the bottom of the list on mine..then just set... the video card to 128....so...Mine looks like this, on the list
I have 12 lines on there , and all are at 00 except these,
9.........32
10.......32
11.......32
12.......128

But hell, I don't know how many pci devices you have, .
Try 32, and I think you'lle know if it causes an adverse reaction....;D Thats cool, BFG has pretty good tech support I see. Did they say to change the video card from 249 to 128 ? cuzz thats what evga recommends... and yeah, a pretty cool tool indeed.
   
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HEY
Old
  (#60)
SwL_Swizzlerz
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Videocard: Nvidia Geforce 6800 gts
Processor: Amd2 5200+
Mainboard: Nv something.
Memory: 2 gigbyte
Soundcard: onbord nv.
PSU: the one that i got at bestbuy
Default HEY - 01-12-2005, 07:27 | posts: 84 | Location: Edmonton, ALberta

OK
I have the same bord aswell i think.
I have the Asus A7n8x nforce 2 rev 2.0 motherboard.
I have a geforce fx 5600

I do see improvment running my latenzy at 64.

What exactly does this mean. Why is it better. And does it voide the warenty of are hardwear from Nvidia, and Asus.

Will it cause damage to my computer at all. I have overclocked in the past however i do not do it anymore.

Basicly someone please explain why it improves the computer. And if it could reck or will not reck my computer"melt hardwear".

thankyou
swizzy
   
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  (#61)
Kuja
 
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Default 01-12-2005, 08:53 | posts: n/a

When you finish figuring out how to spell your name, you might like to look up the word "placebo" toxic warrior, because there's not a chance in hell your sound quality actually improved.
   
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Old
  (#62)
GhostXL
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Videocard: GTX 1080 SLI @ 2.025Ghz
Processor: i7 5775C @ 4.0ghz on H90
Mainboard: ASRock Z97 Extreme 6 SLI
Memory: Trident DDR3 2400 32GB
Soundcard: Logitech G633
PSU: EVGA Supernova 850 P2
Default 01-12-2005, 09:57 | posts: 5,974 | Location: PA, USA

First off....dont be rude...2nd off yes sound quality can be improved with this tweak. Sry if yours did not, you might not require the tweak like others do. So if your one of the lucky ones that didnt be happy and let the others who need this valuable info alone.
   
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  (#63)
Kuja
 
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Default 01-12-2005, 11:25 | posts: n/a

No it can't. I don't think you have the faintest idea what you're talking about either.

The only thing it does is, at high latencies, prevent interruption of one device by another while it is transferring across the bus, or at low latencies it prevents buffer overflows.

That is, the only impact is to prevent (in the case of soundcards) the popping/crackling associated with overflows/interruption. It doesn't improve quality a whit, because the data is still exactly the same.

'Course you can believe what you want, if it makes you feel good
   
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Old
  (#64)
tykjen
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Videocard: Gigabyte GTX 560 Ti
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Default 01-12-2005, 14:39 | posts: 42 | Location: Norway

nice prog! no more stutter in osund or video

but my accton ethernet adapter runs at 80 latency..should i temper with it or leave?
   
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  (#65)
mentalboy
 
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Default 01-12-2005, 17:15 | posts: n/a

Note: I would give link for this, but no longer on internet - expired.

PCI Latency
Prologue

It's all about PCI latency. That's not a piece of conventional wisdom, mind you, any more than it's something you hear people say. At least, I've not heard anybody say it before, but maybe that says more about the circles in which I travel than about the locution itself. I don't know. All such silly babbling aside, trust me: it's all about PCI latency. I recently solved more than a dozen issues I've had with my PC ever since its inception. What's more interesting still is that some of these issues have plagued me for years, across several different machines. I think I finally understand the cause, and I'm as pleased as I am surprised about it. Thus, I'm writing in the hope that others may benefit from my struggles.
The Problems

The list of problems I've just solved is a long one, but they bear some similarities to each other. All of them have to do, in one way or another, with "stuttering", "hitching", pauses, and so forth. For years, I've had my system evince various and infrequent glitches when playing back MP3 files, QuickTime movies, etc. This is something you've probably all seen. You know how it goes: you're playing back a movie trailer, and the video or audio (or both) either repeats or comes to a stop for a brief instant. Maybe you're just playing MP3 files in the background, and your player stutters briefly when you launch a new application-this is the sort of thing I'm talking about. Prior to my recent troubles with my SB Live! sound card under Windows XP, which eventually drove me to upgrade to an Audigy 2 card, I never gave it much thought. I mean, lots of stuff is going on in the background in Windows, right? It just isn't reasonable to expect completely smooth playback... is it?

Frankly, it is. I just didn't know it. What finally provided the incentive to investigate further was the v1.3 patch for Battlefield 1942 (BF1942), a video game with which I've had a love/hate relationship since the day I bought it. The game as it shipped originally didn't work for beans with my SB Live! sound card. Even the v1.2 patch didn't help matters much. When I finally got tired of dealing with the problems, I upgraded to an Audigy 2 sound card. I hadn't upgraded the sound in my rig for several years, so I figured I was probably due anyway. Needless to say, I was grateful when that fixed all the problems with the sound in BF1942.

Unfortunately, I wasn't counting on my luck; i.e., lots of it, all bad. The developers released the v1.3 patch very shortly thereafter, which, naturally, screws Audigy owners (sigh). Seriously, lots of users with Audigy sound cards are reporting awful problems with the sound. For some it stutters or hitches; for others, certain sounds loop continuously without end; still others "enjoy" deafening waves of "white noise". Gee, that's some patch, huh? In my particular case, I had two serious problems with the v1.3 game: (1) I couldn't hear anything when it was right in front of me, and (2) the game hitched very frequently. I fixed the former problem by fussing around with my speaker settings, as I note elsewhere in my technical support tips for BF1942. I have finally fixed in excess of 90% of the instances of the latter problem by adjusting the PCI latency values for some of my system devices. Surprisingly, that has fixed a host of other niggling issues as well, which is why I'm writing this article.

The only remaining hitching problems I'm having with the game at the time of this writing are due to the way the game handles texture, sound, and network data. I know this because, for example, the game always hitches the first time I whip out a grenade, the first time I get really close to any given vehicle, the first time I get close to a given kind of tree, etc. This also happens the first time some sounds play. But once I've seen or heard the particular thing in question, it no longer hitches during in-game encounters with those things. Such symptoms typically indicate poor data-set management on the part of the developers. The game's sometimes-jerky network code is another developer failing, as I've got a fast, high-quality connection. In short, these things don't happen with any other game, and they didn't happen prior to the v1.3 patch, so the developers of BF1942 really need to clean up their engine. Please! The game is a lot of fun when it's working.

At any rate, what fixed the hitching problem was changing my PCI latency settings for my video, network, and sound devices. The BIOS for my motherboard, a Gigabyte GA-7VAXP, does not support any kind of PCI latency tweaking. Ok, that's not quite true. It does let me enable or disable a "PCI Delayed Transaction" option, an "AGP 3.0 Calibration" option, and so forth. But it doesn't let me set the default value for PCI latency as many other motherboards do; instead, the default value is hard-coded at 32-or so I'm told. In my estimation, that's a real mistake in light of what I've learned, though it isn't really a critical one. You see, regardless of what the default value is for PCI latency, your system devices are free to ignore it completely. Yes, that's right, folks: it doesn't matter how you configure PCI latency in the BIOS. Your system devices can set their own values anyway. Isn't that cute? No doubt computer-nerds far more familiar with the PCI specification are probably laughing at me, but I don't think it's very funny.
The Solution: PowerStrip

I discovered all of this after starting to experiment with a utility by the name of PowerStrip. As tweaking utilities go, I honestly didn't think much of PowerStrip until a few days ago. Sure, it allows you to overclock your video card, adjust your monitor timings and such, adjust PCI card settings, and perform a number of other tweaks. The reason I wasn't very impressed previously was because it provides only the most minimal features in any given area compared to other utilities. For example, I can use the Rage3D utility to tweak my ATI Radeon 9700 Pro video card in far more useful ways than PowerStrip supports. Similarly, I can use Rage3D, or several other utilities I've since found, to tweak my monitor's timing parameters and other settings. And while PowerStrip costs roughly $30 (US), Rage3D is free for the taking-though the author does ask for (and deserves in my view) donations. In short, PowerStrip is very much a general tool, which often means that more specialized utilities are preferable.

PowerStrip does one thing, however, that no other utility I've found does. To wit, it allows you to examine and override a number of parameters for the PCI communications bus as applied to each device in your system. The first time I ran PowerStrip, I discovered the likely source of my hitching problems: my video card's PCI latency was at 248, my network device's value was 128, and my poor Audigy 2 sound card was set at 32. In other words, the video card and network card could easily hog the PCI bus to the point whereat my sound card might not be able to keep up with the load. PowerStrip makes it a simple matter to set those values to 80, 32, and 64 respectively. I experimented around a bit, of course, but those values seem to work best for my system.
NB: Because quite a few people have written me regarding how to use PowerStrip, I thought it was worth mentioning two things here. If you're having trouble tweaking the PCI latency values, don't worry, it's probably not your fault; the PowerStrip interface is utterly terrible in this regard. First, to be able to switch from one device to another, you need to look to the right of your video card's name. There are tiny scrollbar buttons there that allow you to select the device you want to tweak. Second, if you find that you can't actually change the latency values, you should look for a check box labelled "Read-only" and make sure it's unchecked. If you still can't find them, click here for a diagram that might help.

I was happy when I found that almost all of my hitching problems with BF1942 had disappeared. I've been growing happier with this solution ever since, because of all the other problems it has fixed as well. For example, my ISP provides a free, one-year, radio-only subscription to the Rhapsody digital music service. I like listening to their classical music "stations" because they have zero commercials. I would gladly listen to the radio were there not so many obnoxious news updates, advertisements, and "talking heads" yammering away between tracks. Heck, I might even pay for it; ever since trying Rhapsody for the first time, I've thought seriously about signing up for their full package. It's a pretty neat service if you've got a good Internet connection.

All such praise aside, Rhapsody used to stutter from time to time. I had increased the network buffer size and all that kind of stuff, but it would still stutter in its playback when I launched certain applications or did certain other things with my system. Since adjusting the PCI latency values for my system devices, it hasn't stuttered once. I've even tested it by playing back QuickTime movies, copying files over the network, and letting Microsoft Visual C++ compile some of my code in the background. It doesn't stutter anymore, period. That's an amazing difference, as it used to stutter any time I opened a session of Windows Explorer. It doesn't do that anymore. That's a wonderful change. I can now listen to defect-free audio all day, it seems, without a single hitch, stutter, or pause.

Similarly, my email program no longer brings the whole system to a halt. Every once in a while when I launched my email client (viz., Eudora Pro v5.2), my whole system would simply freeze for a period of several seconds. I'm not sure precisely what the problem was, but I've always suspected the network because it always happened when the program is trying to connect to my ISP's email server. After making the adjustments with PowerStrip, my email program no longer freezes the whole system. Sure, the email client still sits there waiting to connect, but every other application continues to run smoothly. That's another minor but obvious change, and I find it as welcome as it is obvious.

To avoid redundancy, suffice it to say that I've seen all of my other hitching, stuttering, and pausing problems solved with QuickTime movies, Windows Media Player, MusicMatch JukeBox, all the web browsers that I use, and other applications as well. I've seen the occasional keyboard delays go away as well; i.e., I used to be able to type so fast that Windows sometimes lost my characters, but this doesn't seem to be an issue anymore. I've also seen improvement in a long-running keyboard problem. On occasion, the control keys on my keyboard seem to get stuck in the depressed position, though only logically not physically; i.e., the actual keys are not stuck, but the operating system thinks they're held down. I haven't had that problem occur since I made the changes with PowerStrip, and that's very unusual, as it happened previously quite often with Microsoft Word and Macromedia Dreamweaver.

I've seen almost a dozen other such problems go away as well since making the changes. The result of my changing the PCI latency values has been to give me a much smoother system to use. Though all the issues were individually quite small, solving them all in one fell swoop has suddenly made my daily usage of the computer night-and-day different. Nothing hitches anymore-well, save for some poorly implemented portions of the BF1942 game engine. Almost everything on the system runs as smoothly as it should. And all of this is definitely related to the changes I've made with PowerStrip. If I simply change the values back to their original settings, all of my problems come back to plague me.
Epilogue

Do you find all of this as amazing as I do, dear reader? To be clear: I'm not surprised that the PCI latency settings have such effects on the system as a whole. I have a background in engineering, so I have some knowledge of such things. There are two things, however, that I find very surprising: (1) that BIOS settings can be so freely ignored by individual devices, and (2) that manufacturers are providing such awful defaults with their hardware. I'm sure ATI has their card configure itself to a latency value of 248 so that they can avoid all kinds of technical support calls from persons whose machines can't keep up with the card at a more reasonable setting. But that utterly screws other users, and it does so in a way that isn't simple to diagnose or fix. How many users, after all, are intimately familiar with the PCI specification? How many users are computer-literate enough to go poking around in their BIOS or use PowerStrip properly? From my dealings with the larger community, I think the answer is "not many".

In retrospect, it angers me that when I've tried to work through such stuttering, hitching, and pausing problems in the past with various technical support persons, they've blamed interrupt sharing, my operating system, my drivers, the way the device is configured, my other software, and pretty much everything except their own device (and certainly not its PCI latency settings). Sure, I've had technicians tell me to try adjusting the PCI latency in the system BIOS, but that's utterly bloody useless; it doesn't matter what that's set to if the devices in your system configure themselves otherwise. The system BIOS on my wife's machine lets me tweak the PCI latency setting, but I've found exactly the same thing with her machine; i.e., it doesn't matter to what I set PCI latency in the BIOS, some of the cards in her machine configure themselves far differently anyway.

So, I've just slaughtered a host of annoying system bugs with the application of one simple utility. As you might well expect, I've already purchased my copy of PowerStrip, and that was $30 well spent. If only I had known about it sooner. If you've got any such problems with your system, I suggest you try it. It just might save you hours of time. Be sure to read all the tips and help stuff, however, for using bad PCI latency values can hang your machine pretty easily.

02/20/2003

And for those that haven't seen how to change devices in PS, at the top there are arrows in the right of the row where the video card is listed.
P.S.: Not sure, but I think the bought and paid for "full" version of P.S. is the only one that "keeps" the settings. (Caution)
   
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  (#66)
Capfan
 
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Default 01-12-2005, 18:16 | posts: n/a

Kuja, before flaming someone's spelling, you might want to improve your reading comprehension: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionar...ary&va=worrier



anyway... Great tool mentioned here. After changing the settings to 32, my WoW performance is noticeably improved.
   
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  (#67)
Toxic Worrier
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Videocard: GTX 275
Processor: Phenom ll X4 955 BE ;)
Mainboard: DFI LP UT 790FX-M2R
Memory: 4GB-OCZ-DDR21066LV-Blade-
Soundcard: Asus Xonar D2X
PSU: PCPC 850 watt
Default 01-12-2005, 19:02 | posts: 938 | Location: Middle Georgia

Quote:
Originally posted by Kuja
When you finish figuring out how to spell your name, you might like to look up the word "placebo" toxic warrior, because there's not a chance in hell your sound quality actually improved.

OK then,

Let me sea, eye em tring to impruve mye speling an stuph, but you donte hafe to mace funn of me now du yoo ?
You could have dazzeled us with your brilliance without sounding like phuckhead,,,,oh, there I go missplelling again. .

If I had wanted it to be warrier, it most certainly would have been warrier. It's Worrier NumbNuts....You know, like, Im not at all worried about what you think, or maybe like,,,,Don't worry, you'lle get banned soon enough with a $hit attitude like that. Now, go away KuJo,,,,,,,or whatever you call yourself. I'm going to go listen to how much better my computer sounds.
good luck
   
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  (#68)
GhostXL
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Videocard: GTX 1080 SLI @ 2.025Ghz
Processor: i7 5775C @ 4.0ghz on H90
Mainboard: ASRock Z97 Extreme 6 SLI
Memory: Trident DDR3 2400 32GB
Soundcard: Logitech G633
PSU: EVGA Supernova 850 P2
Default 01-12-2005, 20:16 | posts: 5,974 | Location: PA, USA

XD I dunno what his prob was but i appreciate the info given here its helped me out a bunch...was wondering why my audigy sounded weaker in some games.
   
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  (#69)
mr orange
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Videocard: eVGA gtx 280
Processor: q9550
Mainboard: asus rampage formula
Memory: corsair 2*2048 1066
Soundcard: X-Fi
PSU: corsair hx650w
Default 01-12-2005, 20:22 | posts: 186

ok, let me see, i have here two agp`s.

-host bridge nVidia Corporation nForc2 AGP (different version?) @00
-pci bridge (normal decode) nVidia Corporation nForc2 AGP @32

what are the differences and what is a good value for both.
both 00 because they are onbord?
what is a good value for soundblaster audigy zs2 (default is 32) ?

thanks
   
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  (#70)
wilks
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Videocard: MSI nx-6600 gt AGP
Processor: AMD 2500@3200
Mainboard: MSI KT600 Delta LSR
Memory: 512 PC2700
Soundcard: SB Live hooked up to surround sound
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Default 01-12-2005, 21:14 | posts: 71

In my bios i have a setting called "PCI latency timing" so i went and set it to 64 and fired up the tool everybody has and it showed just about everything is set to 64..so i guess msi has done a good job with this bios setting cause if i set it to 96 or whatever it will show the same with the tool
   
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Stutering worse?
Old
  (#71)
Pylor
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Videocard: Diamond 7970
Processor: I7 920
Mainboard: Asus P6T deluxe v2
Memory: 1600ddr3 3x2 (6gb)
Soundcard: X-fi titanium
PSU: TX-750
Default Stutering worse? - 01-13-2005, 01:08 | posts: 331

I used this program like it said to and i started playing cs source, only the stutering was worse. The only thing i can contribute this to is that my framerate is going over my refresh rate, noticing this i decided to run stress test and i got 66.02 fps (on dx9, presi tweak), this is more than 20 fps more than i got before, did valve release a patch or is this because i lowered the latency to 64? also would the fps going over the refresh rate cause a stutering effect? i did notice a tad bit of tearing.
   
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  (#72)
Toxic Worrier
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Videocard: GTX 275
Processor: Phenom ll X4 955 BE ;)
Mainboard: DFI LP UT 790FX-M2R
Memory: 4GB-OCZ-DDR21066LV-Blade-
Soundcard: Asus Xonar D2X
PSU: PCPC 850 watt
Default 01-13-2005, 02:28 | posts: 938 | Location: Middle Georgia

Whatever you do, don't start experimenting with your motherboard bios. Just use this tool to kind of even out the latency between pci devices and agp devices. Leave the pci latency in your bios at 32 or wherever it's already set.
I only lowered the pci latency to 128 because of evga recomending it. But don't go screwing with all of the latency settings. You might create a problem.
Wilks, I don't think anyone here mentioned changing the pci latency timings in your bios,,,Read the link I posted back near the start of this thread, and try to understand that before you go changing everything that has the letters pci on it. Thats all
   
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eviakhan
 
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Default 01-13-2005, 04:35 | posts: n/a

I downloaded the tool but when I run the exe file, I get an error: "Error Starting the Driver".

I tryied downloading again with the same error. I am doing something wrong? Must it be run from a certain location?

Thanks.
   
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ericdrum
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Videocard: eVGA 670 FTW SLI
Processor: Intel Core i7-2600K
Mainboard: MSI P67A-GD55
Memory: CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB
Soundcard: Soundblaster Recon3D
PSU: Cooler Master S Pro 1000W
Default 01-13-2005, 04:45 | posts: 148 | Location: SLC, Utah

Quote:
Originally posted by eviakhan
I downloaded the tool but when I run the exe file, I get an error: "Error Starting the Driver".

I tryied downloading again with the same error. I am doing something wrong? Must it be run from a certain location?

Thanks.
You need to extract all the files into the same folder(it doesn't matter where) and it should work. You can't just open the archive and run it.
   
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latency discussed at RojakPot
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croc 2
 
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Post latency discussed at RojakPot - 01-13-2005, 05:36 | posts: n/a

For those curious about the interplay between PCI latency settings and AGP settings [whether via BIOS or through other software], you might want to take a look at one of my favorite resource sites, Adrian Wong's Bios Optimization Guide ["BOG"] located at his www.rojakpot.com and specifically read over some of the BIOS discussions including settings for "AGP Secondary Lat(ency) Timer" under the graphics section of the BOG.

I've been perusing this forum in hopes of catching a few clues before installing an MSI 6600GT on a new rig for my nephew and happened across this interesting and informative thread. I used to have a Creative soundcard, so I spent a lot of time chasing PCI latency snarks and snipes in the past. I hope I don't need to actually apply what I have read here, but MMMV.

Nice forum -- haven't visited here ina couple of years.

croc 2 (elderly person of limited knowledge)

Last edited by croc 2; 01-13-2005 at 05:40.
   
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